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eBook Lead Like Ike: Ten Business Strategies from the CEO of D-Day ePub

eBook Lead Like Ike: Ten Business Strategies from the CEO of D-Day ePub

by Mort Crim,Geoff Loftus

  • ISBN: 1598597345
  • Category: Management and Leadership
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Mort Crim,Geoff Loftus
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oasis Audio; Unabridged edition (June 1, 2010)
  • ePub book: 1403 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1352 kb
  • Other: doc txt lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 800

Description

In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff Loftus explores ten essential business strat Who was the greatest CEO of the twentieth century? A persuasive case can be made for General Dwight D. Ike Eisenhower, who undertook history’s most harrowing executive assignment: Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe on June 6, 1944.

In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff Loftus weaves .

In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff Loftus weaves a fly on-the-wall narrative from Ike’s perspective as supreme allied commander overseeing the Normandy invasion. As Loftus rightly observes, no CEO ever faced a more daunting, pressure-filled, obstacle-laden mission than did Ike. Perfect reading for these turbulent times. Who was the greatest CEO of the 20th century? A persuasive case can be made for General Dwight D.

Business leaders like Steve Schwarzman and Larry Fink are in attendance at Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 conference to see and be seen.

But it is just as important to understand the effects of the "dark side". Lead Like Ike: Ten Business Strategies from the CEO of D-Day. Business leaders like Steve Schwarzman and Larry Fink are in attendance at Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 conference to see and be seen.

In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff Loftus explores ten essential business strategies leaders can glean from Ike's role as a commander overseeing the Normandy invasion. Weaving a fly on-the-wall narrative from Ike's perspective, Loftus sweeps readers into a gripping story that honors the sacrifice of all who fought and died on D-Day while exploring the prevailing significance of fundamental leadership principles often forgotten by managers-things like listen to your people, set your vision, be consistent about your message, and let your.

In Lead Like Ike, business writer Geoff Loftus looks at the experiences of Dwight D. "Ike" Eisenhower in his role as Allied commander during World War II, and applies the leadership lessons of D-Day to modern business operations. Also, be sure to check out IMT's interview with author Geoff Loftus. From the book jacket. Lead Like Ike takes readers on a riveting adventure through the eyes of the "CEO" who endured one of history's most pressure-packed tests of leadership.

In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff . Geoff Loftus has written an intriguing and highly useful book on Dwight Eisenhower’s extraordinary ability as a leader.

In "Lead Like Ike," Geoff Loftus provides keen insights on management . Much more than just a business leadership guide, it offers a fresh angle on the events leading up to the Normandy invasion.

In "Lead Like Ike," Geoff Loftus provides keen insights on management lessons drawn from one of the greatest battlefields in military history. The lessons may appear simple, but it's the simplest management principles that we often forget: Listen to your people. Part history book, part business management guide, Lead Like Ike uses business terminology to describe the events leading up to D-Day and draws parallels between those events and common business situations. This is an interesting book.

Geoff Loftus is the author of Murderous Spirit .

Geoff Loftus is the author of Murderous Spirit, The Dark Saint, Engaged to Kill, Double Blind and Lead Like Ike: Ten Business Strategies from the CEO of D-Day He was the 2010 Keynote Speaker at the Eisenhower Legacy Dinner at the Eisenhower Presidential Museum and Library. He has been gainfully employed in business journalism and corporate communications for more than a quarter-century.

Lead Like Ike begins with Eisenhower reporting for work as the CEO of D-Day In. facing a ridiculously tight . In Lead Like Ike, Geoff Loftus provides keen insights on management lessons that can be drawn from one of the greatest battlefields in military history. facing a ridiculously tight timeline, having to create an executive staff and company, and then managing D-Day In. s early projects, the invasions of North Africa and Sicily. By analyzing military operations as business operations, and the commanding general as CEO, Lead Like Ike finds management lessons for modern corporate executives, such as: Determining the mission.

Thomas Nelson Publisher, c. 2010. I have just finished Lead Like Ike, by Geoff Loftus. Ten Business Strategies From The CEO of D-Day, reads like a history book while analyzing the WW2 D-Day invasion as a business operation. I was initially intrigued by the authors title; the concept of this book was brilliant; the execution, however, was innocuous with writing that is very casual and unfortunately a bit redundant, particularly when it comes to the business notions that the author is putting forth.

Who was the greatest CEO of the 20th century? A persuasive case can be made for General Dwight D. “Ike” Eisenhower, who undertook history’s most harrowing executive assignment: Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe on June 6, 1944. In Lead Like Ike, business journalist and communications guru Geoff Loftus weaves a fly-on-the-wall narrative from Ike’s perspective as supreme allied commander overseeing the Normandy invasion. While swept into a gripping story that honors the sacrifice of all who fought and died on D-Day, you’ll also be drawn to a cache of battle-tested strategies and tactics with direct applications to modern-day business leadership.

Comments

Dandr Dandr
Used the book for a class. Great insights into business strategy and Ike.
Faebei Faebei
Until I heard this audio book LEAD LIKE IKE, I had never thought of the military leadership functioning like the CEO of a corporation. This book takes an innovative approach comparing General Dwight Eisenhower’s role as the supreme commander organizing the military operations of World War 2 with the CEO of a corporation. Ten key characteristics form the backbone or outline of this book. The information was engaging and interesting. I heard the book cover to cover and enjoyed this audio. I recommend it.

W. Terry Whalin is an editor and the author of more than 60 books including his latest Billy Graham: A Biography of America's Greatest Evangelist
Fearlessrunner Fearlessrunner
Geoff Loftus has written an interesting book on the leadership of General Dwight D. Eisenhower as the CEO of D-Day Inc. The author makes apt parallels between the scope of managing a huge operational effort such as D-Day - known as Operation Overlord - and the skills required to run a global, multinational corporation.

Candidly, the stakes associated with the Allied invasion of Europe were far higher than the risks associated with a company's attempt to compete by taking market share from an established competitor. Nevertheless, there are aspects germane to both that remain analogous.

There is an over-riding historical narrative that depicts Ike as he matures in command. His strengths and weaknesses as a commander are portrayed honestly. Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin are cast as the Board of Directors while colorful personalities such as Gen. George Patton, Field Marshall Montgomery and Omar Bradley are among the key managers reporting to Ike.

For those of us who have logged professional time within the structure of the military and / or corporate America the interpersonal dynamics of the organization here will strike a familiar chord; one that I am glad to have experienced, but equally grateful from which to be currently removed.

There are quite a few literally battle-tested leadership strategies presented in the course of the story line. The author takes the time to `debrief' at the conclusion of each chapter to reinforce those principles that made all the difference between failure and success.

Today's crop of upcoming managers who aspire to leadership positions or to be a CEO will be well-served to read this book. I'm particularly interested in how this book will be interpreted by those managers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, who rise to the level of CEO.
Vudojar Vudojar
Did you ever wonder what management principles go into the prosecution of a war, what business lessons can be earned from its study? "Lead Like Ike" provides a good case study of the management lessons to be learned from the greatest martial enterprise of all time, D-Day, Inc.'s assault on its German competition. This book is part history, part management case study and always attention grasping.

Author Geoff Loftus follows Dwight Eisenhower's leadership from his assignment as Commander of Overlord through to Victory in Europe, periodically interrupting the narrative with sidebars to emphasize the management principles employed by Ike and drawing comparisons to similar steps taken by business leaders.

Loftus takes the reader through ten strategies for success and shows how Ike succeeded and, in some instances, failed, in each of them.

Strategy No. 1: Determine Your Mission- D-Day, Inc.'s mission, "unconditional surrender," was determined by its chairman of the board- Franklin D. Roosevelt. Ike achieved that out without an eloquent mission statement, but with incessant concern for his workers who would carry the mission to a successful conclusion.

Strategy No. 2: Plan for Success-Ike asked the question of whether D-Day, Inc. could have survived without Overlord and correctly concluded that it could, but could not afford continued operations if it did not take a chance on Overlord. He then made his plans accordingly. Loftus compares that to the Japanese companies who, when they needed to set up plants in the U.S., assured that those plants would maintain their companies' reputations for quality. He contrasts then to GM and Chrysler who failed to plan for success by not designing and building fuel-efficient cars.

Strategy No. 3: Stay Focused-Recognizing the need for a port to support the build-up, Ike stayed focused when he placed the western-most beach of Overlord, Utah, within reach of Cherbourg. He lost his focus when he let Montgomery pursue Market-Garden while ignoring the need for the port of Antwerp. Loftus then brings up the examples of two profitable companies, Enron and Arthur Anderson, that let the pursuit of more profits distract their focus to the companies' destruction.
Strategy No. 4: Prioritize- Ike knew that he needed the strategic air forces for the Transportation Plan preparatory to D-Day and risked his job to get it. He got what he needed, and it worked.

Strategy No. 5: Plan to Implement-Ike laid out the plans; Who-Hundreds of thousands of men who would be trained for their missions; What- five divisions that would assault the beaches; Where- Normandy, close enough to England bur far enough from Calais to create surprise; When- When light, tides weather and moonlight were right; How-A million details.

Strategy No. 6: Communicate- Ike communicated with his board, primarily Roosevelt and Churchill, to keep them on board with the program and to maintain support for what D-Day, Inc. needed. He also communicated with his generals by letting them know what was expected and with his men by visiting them, sometime with the result that they cheered him up. His one failure to communicate was evidenced by the incessant bickering with Montgomery.

Strategy No. 7: Motivate your People-Make sure that the enlisted men have the same access to jeeps for recreation as the officers and that captured wine would be shared equally. Compare that to Henry Ford who made sure that his early workers could afford the cars that they built.

Strategy No. 8: Manage Your People-Ike put his personal feelings aside and employed his people to the greatest advantage, whether that meant putting up with Patton's antics, Montgomery's insubordination or promoting a quiet performer like Bradley.
Strategy No. 9: Avoid Project Creep-An early failure when Overlord became Torch (North Africa), which became Husky (Sicily) which became Avalanche (Italy). A wiser Ike avoided Project Creep when he rebuffed attempts to capture Berlin at the expense of the mission of destruction of the German Army.

Strategy No. 10: Be Honest- Ike recognized his mistakes in North Africa, leveled with the press about Patton's slapping a soldier and was ready to accept responsibility had Overlord failed. What businessman could do more?

There you have it, ten steps to success in business or war. Whether you are a business person, a history buff or a combination of the two, "Lead Like Ike" is a book that you will enjoy and from which you will profit.