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eBook Next Now: Trends for the Future ePub

eBook Next Now: Trends for the Future ePub

by Marian Salzman,Ira Matathia

  • ISBN: 1403975647
  • Category: Marketing and Sales
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Marian Salzman,Ira Matathia
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; First Edition edition (December 26, 2006)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1423 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1123 kb
  • Other: docx mbr lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 750

Description

Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia smartly avoid that trap. NEXT NOW is a great book for the uninitiated, but not so much for the professional working in a field that requires glimpses of the coming years. 6 people found this helpful.

Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia smartly avoid that trap. Their 'future' ends in four or five years, which allows them to go close and look hard. This is an eye-opening, scary, thrilling book. Praise for the original Next: "Salzman and Matathia offer a dizzying snapshot of what our world might look like in the next five to ten years.

Marian Salzman is one of the world's leading trendspotters. Marian and Ira have co-authored the books Next: Trends for the Near Future, Buzz: Harness the Power of Influence and Create Demand, and The Future of Men. She is executive vice-president of advertising giant JW. ra Matathia has spent 25 years managing and creating change in some of the world's top marketing communication enterprises. He is a partner in NoFormula, a strategic brand consultancy based in New York and London.

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Next Now: Trends for the Future. by Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia. trendspotting duo who has predicted everything from metrosexuality to the growth of global brands comes a new, enlightening look at the future. From the world-renowned trendspotting duo who has predicted everything from metrosexuality to the growth of global brands comes a new, enlightening look at the future

The Future of Men. 5. Buzz. 8. Customers who read this summary also read.

Looking for the book? We have the summary! Get the key insights in just 10 minutes. The Future of Men.

Ira Matathia has spent 25 years managing and creating change in some of the world's top marketing communication enterprises.

From the world-renowned trendspotting duo who has predicted everything from metrosexuality to the growth of global brands comes a new, enlightening look at the future.

Marian Salzman, Ira Matathia. Place of Publication. MARIAN SALZMAN is one of the world's leading trendspotters

Marian Salzman, Ira Matathia. NY. Author Biography. MARIAN SALZMAN is one of the world's leading trendspotters. He is a partner in NoFormula, a New York and London-based strategic brand consultancy. Marian and Ira have co-authored the books Next: Trends for the Near Future, Buzz: Harness the Power of Influence and Create Demand and The Future of Men. Country of Publication

Are you sure you want to remove NEXT NOW: TRENDS FOR THE FUTURE. from your list? Next now: trends for the future. by MARIAN L. SALZMAN, Marian Salzman, Ira Matathia. Published by PALGRAVE MACMILLAN in NEW YORK. Written in Undetermined.

Trends for the Future. Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia Marian and Ira have co-authored the books Next: Trends for the Near Future, Buzz: Harness the Power of Influence and Create Demand, and Th. . Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia. St. Martin's Griffin. The trouble with most futurologists is that they tell you the future will consist of incessant, unimaginable change-and then go on to describe it, in detail, with unjustified confidence. Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia smartly avoid that trap. Their 'future' ends in four or five years, which allows them to go close and l. ore. Well-organized and readable. Marian Salzman.

From the world-renowned trendspotting duo who has predicted everything from metrosexuality to the growth of global brands comes a new, enlightening look at the future. Based on intensive research and interviews as well as the authors' real-world and business experience in locations across the globe, this book yields surprising conclusions about everything from work (the end of permanent full-time employment) to sex (disappearing gender boundaries) to business (the emergence of true one-to-one marketing and the birth of "Chindia"). Essential reading for managers, marketers, and just about everyone else.

Comments

Katishi Katishi
Much of what is discussed I have seen coming to be. I cannot wait for the next edition.
Dyni Dyni
When I saw the title of Marian Salzman and Ira Matathia's book on trends, NEXT NOW, I was totally lured in. The world is moving at such a frantic pace these days that if you're not careful, you'll only be able to keep up with your small part of it. As a father, I like to consider what's coming down the pipe. I need to be able to advise my kids regarding education, possible job futures, impending medical breakthroughs, health risks, and general states-of-affairs regarding political and economic trends.

I spend a lot of time considering the future and what may or may not happen. And it's not just about my family. I'm also working writer. The fiction novels I do these days tend to have a lot of research in them. You can't just write a spy novel with an evil, nefarious villain behind all the bad things that happen to the hero without going into why he's that way. Readers want to know how that villain is motivated. They want to know what political, religious, or economic sanctions triggered that villain's point of view.

So I tend to read a lot of online material, periodical magazines, book reviews, books, and watch a lot of television regarding emerging technologies. As it turns out, I'm either more educated in these fields that I thought I was, or the authors of this book didn't quite go far enough with their explorations of what's coming next.

Most of material they cover, I was already familiar with to a degree. Moreover, I was disappointed because they usually only superficially skim the surface of material they introduce in the book. In fact, some of the things they write about I've already been covering in my fiction for a couple of years. Such as the emerging economic growth of China and the direct challenge to the United States for oil as a consumer. A lot of people blame the oil companies for making vast amounts of profits, and surely they are, but the only reason they're able to do that is because the market has expanded and the quantity of the product has not. In fact, being more environmentally aware as well as politically conscious of emerging Third World countries has hindered oil production as well.

That increased market has been in the news if you know where to look for it for years. Unfortunately most people, corporate executives are guilty as well, tend not to look at these things. They're all about the here and now, and don't focus on the next at all.

Those people will probably be intimidated, shocked, and in awe of what Salzman and Matathia write about in their book. As a primer for the uneducated, NEXT NOW is a great little book that should jumpstart questions and interest. However, those who are fairly fluent in these emerging technologies and trends are going to be disappointed because they don't get anything really new.

In fact, the book has more focus on the recent past that it does on the next few years it claims it will cover. It's valuable to a degree in interpreting what is happened and offers some insight into what may be right around the corner.

The writing is workmanlike, though it gets a little clunky of times. Also, there's a habit of switching topics too quickly. Some of the material begs to be discussed more in-depth and doesn't receive the attention it deserves.

Furthermore, I would have liked to have more source material available beyond the book. I want to know where the authors got their information, what books or magazines they referenced, who they talked to in order to get the knowledge, so that I might have been able to follow up on some of the information myself.

I'm self-educated in these areas. You almost have to be. By the time a professor puts together a curriculum that will serve to teach you these things, it will be too late to act upon them. I like thinkers. They encourage me to think for myself and to wonder what if.

NEXT NOW is a great book for the uninitiated, but not so much for the professional working in a field that requires glimpses of the coming years.
Qag Qag
Marian Salzman (EVP and Director of Strategic Content for J. WalterThompson) and Ira Matathia (joint managing partner of Intelligence Partners LLC) set out to predict what our lives might be like in the years 2007 to 2010. Unfortunately, I think they have done a better job of telling us what has already happened than they have of telling us what may be.

The authors break their trend-spotting into three sections. The first covers geopolitical trends, the second looks at cultural trends and the third reviews more personal trends.

Some of the trends they identify include:

* The importance of personal branding.

* Potential reunions of the offspring of sperm donors.

* The impact of energy cost on lifestyles.

* The need for IT-free spaces - havens from connectivity.

* The potentially huge number of cars in China.

* The rise of Chindia (China and India).

* The growing need to fend for ourselves, and the accompanying rise in anxiety levels.

* The importance of networking to all of us.

The publisher claims this book is "based on intensive research and interviews" and is "essential reading for managers, marketers, and just about everyone else." Unfortunately, neither seems to be true.

I like my non-fiction books to be based on hard evidence as much as possible. And that usually means primary sources - research, peer-reviewed scientific works, interviews and observations. Based on the Notes, however, this book is based mainly on the popular press. I surveyed the Notes for five chapters and found that 85 percent were references to the popular press.

That's a problem for a couple of reasons. First of all, like many business leaders, I keep abreast of the popular press. In addition I subscribe to a number of blogs. I was already aware of most of these trends, and you will be, too. By reporting on trends already extensively publicized, the authors have deprived us of any real surprise.

The second problem with using secondary sources like the popular press is the inevitable distortion that comes in translating re from science to press. It would have been much better to start with primary sources and translate them once - for the book. By summarizing summaries the authors have introduced a needless second step of distortion.

If I am going to spend my valuable time with a non-fiction book, I expect to come away with action ideas and insights in return. This book, however, left me empty handed. It's rare that I am unable to take away at least a few helpful insights when I read a business book, but that's the case with Next Now.

My recommendation: rather than buy this book, buy John Naisbitt's "Mindset!: Reset Your Thinking and See the Future" and learn how to sort out what's next yourself.