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eBook The Influentials: One American in Ten Tells the Other Nine How to Vote, Where to Eat, and What to Buy ePub

eBook The Influentials: One American in Ten Tells the Other Nine How to Vote, Where to Eat, and What to Buy ePub

by Edward Keller,Jonathan Berry

  • ISBN: 0743227298
  • Category: Marketing and Sales
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Edward Keller,Jonathan Berry
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press; First Edition edition (January 13, 2003)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1929 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1411 kb
  • Other: azw mobi lit txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 696

Description

As has been mentioned by others, this business book rises above others with the standard advice to do X or Y, with no empirical data.

A good point, but Keller and Berry do not reject the influence of the celebrity and celebrity brand culture. They answer that that Roper Influentials are not only leaders in the sense that others look to them for political or community leadership, but that non-Influentials also look to them for guidance on most consumer goods and entertainment because Influentials also tend to be early adopters of new goods, services and culture. As has been mentioned by others, this business book rises above others with the standard advice to do X or Y, with no empirical data.

The Influentials tells who they are, and how they can be influenced . but then delves in to lots of statistics based on surveys of Americans done by Roper Reports.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Further reproduction prohibited without permission.

They're not the "early adopters,­" always the first to try everything from Franco-­Polynesian fusion cooking to digital cameras. and they wield a huge amount of influence within those communities. They're the campaigners for open-­space initiatives.

How we measure 'reads'. 118+ million publications.

They're not America's most affluent 10 percent or best-educated 10 percent. They're not the "early adopters," always the first to try everything from Franco-Polynesian fusion cooking to digital cameras. They're the campaigners.

They're not America's most affluent ten percent or best-educated ten percent. They're the campaigners for.

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Influentials: One American in Ten Tells. Publisher: Free Press Publication Date: 2006 Binding: Hardcover Book Condition: Good.

One American in ten tells the other nine how to vote, where to eat, and what to buy. They are The Influentials Who are they? The most influential Americans -- the ones who tell their neighbors what to buy, which politicians to support, and where to vacation -- are not necessarily the people you'd expect. They're not America's most affluent 10 percent or best-educated 10 percent. They're not the "early adopters," always the first to try everything from Franco-Polynesian fusion cooking to digital cameras. They are, however, the 10 percent of Americans most engaged in their local communities...and they wield a huge amount of influence within those communities. They're the campaigners for open-space initiatives. They're church vestrymen and friends of the local public library. They're the Influentials...and whether or not they are familiar to you, they're very well known to the researchers at RoperASW. For decades, these researchers have been on a quest for marketing's holy grail: that elusive but supremely powerful channel known as word of mouth. What they've learned is that even more important than the "word" -- what is said -- is the "mouth" -- who says it. They've identified, studied, and analyzed influence in America since the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey (now Exxon) hired Elmo Roper himself to develop a model for identifying opinion leaders, and in The Influentials, they are finally ready to share their results. A few samples: • Influentials have been the "early majority" -- leading indicators of what Americans will be buying -- for more than five decades, from choosing energy-efficient cars in the 1970s to owning computers in the 1980s to adopting 401(k)s and IRAs in the 1990s to using the Internet and cell phones today. • Influentials have led the way in social development as well, from the revival of self-reliance (in managing their own health care, investments, and consumption) to mass skepticism about the marketing claims of everything from breakfast food to politicians. Although America's Influentials have always been powerful, they've never been more important than now. Today, a fragmented market has made it possible for Influentials to opt out of mass-message advertising, which means that a different route must be taken to capture their hearts and minds. The Influentials is a map for that route, a map that explains who these people are, how they exercise influence, and how they can be targeted. The Influentials features a series of rules and guidelines for marketing to Influentials; case studies of products that have prospered because of Influential marketing (and products that have failed because they lacked it); a history of the phenomenon...and why Influentials are more influential today than ever; and profiles of twelve real-life Influentials. Both an intellectual adventure and a hands-on marketing manual, The Influentials is an extraordinary gold mine of information and analysis that no business can afford to ignore.

Comments

Foginn Foginn
Having read this book, I know that I am one of the Influentials. I love reading, travelling, gadgets, history and politics. I was nodding in agreement throughout the book. I was very impressed by the fact that Influentials wanted a device that was a mobile telephone, a music player, a camera and an internet browser all in one. This book was written in 2004. The iPhone was released in 2007 which was the year that I read it. I was amazed that the iPhone was exactly what the Influentials wanted.

This book is well worth reading.
Kulwes Kulwes
For one simple, powerful reason THE INFLUENTIALS stands head and shoulders above the field in the marketing trends book sweepstakes. Its insights are based on data, long-term empirical data, judiciously considered. Facts. Numbers. A real departure from most books about the American consumer which base their hypotheses, and thus their recommendations, on anecdotes, renovated B-school doctrine, all plumped up with a few chunks of data culled willy nilly from any variety of sources. (Has anybody else noticed that the same warmed-over statistics show up again and again in the most marketing books? Shall we blame the Internet and Lexis/Nexis searches for this sudden homogeneity?). THE INFLUENTIALS, on the other hand, shares primary research data on the American consumer going back 30 years or more. Berry's and Keller's insights and recommendations are shaped by the evolving opinions of Americans. The horse is before the cart where the horse belongs.
Interspersed with the data and trend analysis, Berry and Keller introduce in mini-bios to actual Influentials. These particularly well-written sections serve to embody the data, (the data sections can get a little overwhelming at times) and show us how an Influential lives, thinks and leads. Most are local community leaders, or have real involvement in their communities, and and as such are the nodes of wide personal networks. They are the people who get things done, the people to whom others look to for advice or counsel. By the way, over the years, about 10% of Americans have ?qualified? by their behavior to be counted as Influentials. The definition of an Influential is based on a question about people's political and other civic behavior that Roper has been asking since the 1920s, and has been updating ever since to reflect changing times.
Now it could be argued that the Roper definition of what constitutes an influential American is antiquated, no longer applicable in the post-modern era. For instance it could be said that the influence of super-empowered individuals (to use Thomas Friedman's term) has been magnified in our hypermediated age to such an extent that "celebrities" now have exponentially more sway over how we choose to think, to live, to dream than any local influential. A good point, but Keller and Berry do not reject the influence of the celebrity and celebrity brand culture. They answer that that Roper Influentials are not only leaders in the sense that others look to them for political or community leadership, but that non-Influentials also look to them for guidance on most consumer goods and entertainment because Influentials also tend to be early adopters of new goods, services and culture. In other words, Influentials serve as an early warning system for those trends that other Americans will get to a six months to a year or so later.
What's really impressive about THE INFLUENTIALS is that Berry and Keller share so much data. That runs counter to another kind of marketing book that readers in this field will recognize -- the marketing books as "teaser." In this type of marketing trends book, the reader is told that the insights offered in the books are based on years of trend data, presumably similar to that found in THE INFLUENTIALS. This type of marketing trends book then indicates that the real information is only available to the clients of the writers. They go on to cite case studies where organizations have used the data to effect stellar marketing programs and boost profit. In other words, now you?ve got to buy their consulting services to get the real information and the real help you need. In THE INFLUENTIALS, it's all there - sometimes actually too much is there - but that's certainly better than books that are empty shells, "door openers" for standard consulting services.
All in all a solid, well-conceived, time-tested and amply proven marketing paradigm. A rare treat.
Inerrace Inerrace
A bit of flattery for those who fill out online surveys. If that is you....
Dusho Dusho
This is a good foundational book on the concept of Influencials. It reads moderately quick and has a great deal of information. I recommend it to anyone who is ramping up on this topic. Caveat: the book was published in 2003. This area has changed a lot given the rise of social and online marketing. Like I said, it's a foundational book.
Debeme Debeme
As has been mentioned by others, this business book rises above others with the standard advice to do X or Y, with no empirical data. Hands down it is better than the self-aggrandizing autobiographies of CEOs who tell "how I did it." Yet, The Influentials falls short of what was possible. At no time are any models provided that explicitly lay out what influentials are, how their influence functions in society, or how their attitudes directly affect purchasing trends. In the place of any causation theory, the book piles on the descriptive statistics, with an occasional "We told you so" reference to previous Roper publications. A lingering question I had was the longitudinal nature of the research. Since the influentials were identified as early as thirty years ago, I wondered how their influence changed over time, but in fact the data was not longitudinal at all. A definition of influentials was made and then the researchers simply looked out for such people and interviewed them. Here the research starts to look a bit circular in logic, and we may ask if the samples interviewed were really "influentials" or simply people who answered questions in a way that fit into what Roper is looking for.
The book is a good read though, and the marketing trend to place the customer at the center of all the firm's efforts is right on target.
Dynen Dynen
Significantly out of date to make this book completely irrelevant. "Word of mouth" has been replaced by Yelp. You don't need 350 pages to point that out.
Zinnthi Zinnthi
The Roper organization has long been known for the quality and reliability of its data. Now it has given us a remarkable distillation of information in order to show how a select group of people carry more weight in the decision-making processes of the rest of us.
In "The Influentials: One American in Ten Tells the Other Nine How to Vote, Where to Eat and What to Buy," Jon Berry and Ed Keller of Roper ASW tell us how certain people stay ahead of the curve and, essentially, create and maintain that most precious of marketing commodities: "word of mouth."
Of course, the real trick is discover how channels of influence weave their way through the popular culture and subtly induce us to buy. The "Influentials" among us have mastered this because, according to Berry and Keller, they are more likely to accept new ideas, to ask questions, and to listen carefully. With its fact-based approach, "The Influentials" brings us into the lives of people whose habits, desires and innate characteristics enable them to create the "buzz" that will lead to product success.
The book is extremely well documented, with lots of charts and graphs that go back through 30 years or Roper research. As a marketing professional, I was impressed with their arguments and their proven methods. Great book. I say, go for it !.