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eBook Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market ePub

eBook Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market ePub

by Susan Strasser

  • ISBN: 1588341461
  • Category: Marketing and Sales
  • Subcategory: Perfomance and Work
  • Author: Susan Strasser
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Smithsonian Books; Edition Unstated edition (May 2004)
  • Pages: 348
  • ePub book: 1391 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1855 kb
  • Other: lit azw lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 259

Description

Satisfaction Guaranteed brings the subject of mass-market society out of the clouds of theory and down to earth. Village Voice Literary Supplement

Satisfaction Guaranteed brings the subject of mass-market society out of the clouds of theory and down to earth. Village Voice Literary Supplement. Strasser shows how we have evolved into a consumer culture in which the creation of demand is central. Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World. Susan Strasser teaches history at the University of Delaware. Her books include Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash. Gives complete insight to our pathetic consumer society today.

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Book jacket Susan Strasser is the author of the award winning "Never Done" & "Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market.

With colorful prose and provocative stories, Satisfaction Guaranteed uncovers the roots of America's consumer society, obsession with shopping, and devotion to brands. Susan Strasser is the author of the award winning "Never Done" & "Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market. Her articles have appeared in "The New York Times," "The Washington Post," & "The Nation. A professor of history at the University of Delaware, she lives near Washington, .

Strasser, Susan, 1948-. Advertising, Consumers, Sales promotion, Brand name products. New York : Pantheon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 10, 2012.

Her use of advertising documents the shift from product-based to consumer-based ads that was necessary to establish a national market. Recently Viewed and Featured. A New General Theory Of The Teeth Of Wheels (1852).

Satisfaction Guaranteed : The Making of the American Mass Market. By (author) Susan Strasser.

Items related to Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American. Strasser, Susan Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market. ISBN 13: 9781588341464. Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market.

The Making of the American Mass Market. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Smithsonian Institution Press. Need help ASAP? We have you covered with 24/7 instant online tutoring. Connect with one of our tutors now. ABOUT CHEGG.

This sweeping history provides the reader with a better understanding of America’s consumer society, obsession with shopping, and devotion to brands. Focusing on the advertising campaigns of Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, Wrigley’s, Gillette, and Kodak, Strasser shows how companies created both national brands and national markets. These new brands eventually displaced generic manufacturers and created a new desire for brand-name goods. The book also details the rise and development of department stores such as Macy’s, grocery store chains such as A&P and Piggly Wiggly, and mail-order companies like Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward.

Comments

BlackHaze BlackHaze
A fascinating read on the roots of advertising, branding, and how capitalism led us from farms to disconnected modern consumerism. Highly, highly recommend.
Arthunter Arthunter
Strasser's eye for research coupled with easy to follow writing style makes reading the past as simple getting on the Internet. Gives complete insight to our pathetic consumer society today.
Nilabor Nilabor
This is a very detailed economic history of wholesaling and retailing from about 1880 to 1930. The first chapter describes how Proctor and Gamble set out about creating consumer demand for a completely new product, Crisco, in 1912. In this chapter, Strasser eloquently points out "Human needs...are cultural constructs....Some people need yams and breadfruit, others Post Toasties and Kellogg's corn flakes." Now there's a thought worth pondering, as we consider "Do we need a second car in the family? Do we need a new TV? Do we need dental floss?"
After reading some of Strasser's other books, I expected this book to focus more on this topic of need creation in the world of American manufacturing. However, much of the rest of the book is devoted to documenting business practices during the period. Subsequent chapters cover labeling and branding as a means of establishing consumer confidence and brand loyalty, the shift away from middlemen in the chain of distribution from producers to retailers, advertising as a way to introduce new products and habits to consumers, early marketing and promotion practices, the development of the self-service grocery store and the rise of retail chains and government regulations of the period affecting retailing and food. The book is amply illustrated with black and white reproductions of period ads, photographs, and cartoons. Source material is referenced with unnumbered endnotes; there is no separate bibliography or list of suggested readings. The book includes an index.
I found reading this book through to be a tough slog. The style is highly academic, and the details tend to obscure the big picture. I found myself lost in the details, waiting for her to address the main points. I wanted to learn more about how manufacturers had changed American culture. Looking back and reflecting on what Strasser wrote, I can see that she did indeed tackle these topics, but there was so much information about the history of manufacturing and retailing and marketing that I missed what I was looking for in the first place. That said, the book still represents a fine piece of academic research. Her overview of the development of marketing and retailing practices in America from 1900-1930 is particularly well-researched and her illustrations are varied and well-chosen. All in all, the book wasn't exactly what I was looking for, but it was still well worth reading.