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eBook J. C. Nichols and the Shaping of Kansas City: Innovation in Planned Residential Communities ePub

eBook J. C. Nichols and the Shaping of Kansas City: Innovation in Planned Residential Communities ePub

by William S. Worley

  • ISBN: 0826209262
  • Category: Architecture
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: William S. Worley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Missouri (August 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1836 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1858 kb
  • Other: rtf doc docx azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 725

Description

Nichols was prominent in Kansas City civic life, being involved in the creation of the Liberty Memorial . Worley, William S. (1993). Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press.

Nichols was prominent in Kansas City civic life, being involved in the creation of the Liberty Memorial, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, MRIGlobal, as well as the development of Kansas City University, now the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Nichols served in leadership positions of local and national real estate and planning organizations.

In telling how Nichols shaped Kansas City, Worley has . This book gives a few pointers: 1. By using deed restrictions to freeze his neighborhoods in place, Nichols ensured that his neighborhoods continued to be wealthy over time.

In telling how Nichols shaped Kansas City, Worley has made an important contribution to the history of American real estate. -Journal of the West. By contrast, before him, Kansas City's proto-sprawl ensured that the center of the city's upper-class population moved a little further south every decade. In 1900, that "social center" was in an area that is now very much part of the central business district. By 1915, it had moved 20 blocks south to the Hyde Park neighborhood.

3. Nichols is of course most famous for Country Club Plaza, a shopping center that has become Kansas City's satellite intown downtown.

Born and reared on the outskirts of Kansas City in Olathe, Kansas, Jesse Clyde Nichols (1880-1950) was a creative genius in land development. He grew up witnessing the cycles of development and decline characteristics of Kansas City and other American cities during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

American Architecture. Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 51 No. 1, Ma. 1992 (pp. 106-107) DOI: 1. 307/990655. Find this author on Google Scholar. This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears above.

Often synonymous with Kansas City is the beautiful and enchanting Country Club Plaza.

Published by: University of Missouri Press. Often synonymous with Kansas City is the beautiful and enchanting Country Club Plaza. This upscale midtown shopping center and surrounding suburban community-which remain the places to shop and live nearly sixty years after their construction-are a testament to the creative genius of .

The city started as a planned upscale community for the elite by . Nichols laid out plans in 1914 ^ William S. Worley (October 1993). Nichols to be built around the Mission Hills Country Club (Kansas) on the hills above Brush Creek just south of the Shawnee Methodist Mission. Most of the country club's property is in Kansas but its original clubhouse was in Kansas City, Missouri, allowing it to serve liquor, which was prohibited on the Kansas side. Nichols laid out plans in 1914  . William S.

ByWilliam S. Worley · Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1990. xxv + 324 pp. Maps, illustrations, tables, chronology, bibliography, notes, and index. Recommend this journal.

The Nichols Prize, endowed by the family of . . Nichols, honors the legacy of the legendary Kansas City, Missouri, developer. Nichols pioneered the development of sustainable, mass-market residential neighborhoods built for permanence, and automobile-oriented shopping centers. The Country Club District, a model residential community; Country Club Plaza, a 77-year-old shopping center and multiuse development; and numerous well-preserved suburban communities south of downtown Kansas City attest to his enduring legacy in that city.

Born and reared on the outskirts of Kansas City in Olathe, Kansas, Jesse Clyde Nichols (1880-1950) was a creative genius in land development. He grew up witnessing the cycles of development and decline characteristics of Kansas City and other American cities during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These early memories contributed to his interest in real estate and led him to pursue his goal of neighborhoods in Kansas City, an idea unfamiliar to that city and a rarity across the United States.J.C. Nichols was one of the first developers in the country to lure buyers with a combination of such attractions as paved streets, sidewalks, landscaped areas, and access to water and sewers. He also initiated restrictive covenants and to control the use of structures built in and around his neighborhoods.In addition, Nichols was involved in the placement of services such as schools, churches, and recreation and shopping areas, all of which were essential to the success of his developments. In 1923, Nichols and his company developed the Country Club Plaza, the first of many regional shopping centers built in anticipation of the increased use of automobiles. Known throughout the United States, the Plaza is a lasting tribute to the creativity of J.C. Nichols and his legacy to the United States. With single-mindedness of purpose and unwavering devotion to achievement, J.C. Nichols left an indelible imprint on the Kansas City metropolitan area, and thereby influenced the design and development of major residential and commercial areas throughout the United States as well. Based on extensive research, J.C. Nichols and the Shaping of Kansas City is a valuable study of one of the most influential entrepreneurs in American land development.

Comments

Dominator Dominator
Well-researched and detailed, really illustrates the economics, legal framework, and racial politics of the suburbs.
misery misery
On the positive side, this book is certainly informative: a blow-by-blow guide to the career of J.C. Nichols, a developer who built not only Country Club Plaza (a shopping center built in 1922 and still going strong) but also most of Kansas City's affluent southwestern neighborhoods. Why is Nichols important? What can we learn from him? This book gives a few pointers:

1. By using deed restrictions to freeze his neighborhoods in place, Nichols ensured that his neighborhoods continued to be wealthy over time. By contrast, before him, Kansas City's proto-sprawl ensured that the center of the city's upper-class population moved a little further south every decade. In 1900, that "social center" was in an area that is now very much part of the central business district. By 1915, it had moved 20 blocks south to the Hyde Park neighborhood. By 1930, it had moved to areas developed by Nichols- and it remained there in 1975. Today, the areas developed by Nichols are still the wealthiest in the metro area, though much of the middle and upper middle class has leapfrogged into suburbia. On the other hand, Nichols was lucky as well as good: even before he began building in the first decade of the 20th century, wealthy Kansas Citians were moving south towards land he owned.

2. Nichols was innovative in a lot of smaller ways: he used parks and shopping centers as boundaries to buffer different types of neighborhoods from each other, rather than allowing long strips of commercial development- thus preventing the kind of jumbled, strip mall sprawl that makes Levittown look less attractive than his developments. Nichols also and made neighborhoods more attractive by giving sweetheart deals to private schools and churches catering to the upper classes.

3. Nichols is of course most famous for Country Club Plaza, a shopping center that has become Kansas City's satellite intown downtown. What went right here? First, Nichols managed to accommodate both the automobile and pedestrians, installing parking garages but not putting yards of parking in front of every store. Also, Nichols favored surrounding the Plaza with apartments, thus creating a built-in customer base for his shops.

Having praised this book, I would add somewhat negative note: because it piles detail upon detail, it can be a pretty slow read for a 300-page book. So reading it cover to cover may not be for everyone.