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eBook The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery ePub

eBook The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery ePub

by Kenneth Frampton,Tod Williams

  • ISBN: 0847838056
  • Category: Architecture
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Kenneth Frampton,Tod Williams
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Skira Rizzoli (November 27, 2012)
  • Pages: 176
  • ePub book: 1525 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1771 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 351

Description

Written by the architects, it provides many insights into the site plan of the new campus, space layout of the buildings and detailed aesthetic considerations both inside and out.

Written by the architects, it provides many insights into the site plan of the new campus, space layout of the buildings and detailed aesthetic considerations both inside and out. Specifically, it details how nature is embraced in the visit experience, how the stone building materials were selected, and the use of and management of light and space

Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery by Tod Williams, Billie Tsien, and Kenneth Frampton

The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery by Tod Williams, Billie Tsien, and Kenneth Frampton. The book presents photographs and drawings highlighting the building's sensitivity to the Foundation's original building at Merion, commissioned by Dr. Albert C. Barnes and designed by Paul Cret in the 1920s. 176 pages, 9 ¾ 11 ¾ inches (2. 30 c. Hardcover. Color illustrations throughout.

In 2007, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects received the commission to. .The photography in this book almost captures its essence.

emily Ying rated it really liked it Aug 07, 2016.

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In 2007, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects received the commission to design the new Barnes Foundation .

The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery by Tod Williams, Billie Tsien, and Kenneth Frampton. The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission by David B. Brownlee. American Male Novelists: The New Deal. The Violent Visions of Slavoj Žižek. Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism by Slavoj Žižek. Living in the End Times by Slavoj Žižek. Ghosts in the Twilight. Home by Toni Morrison.

Close to five years in the making, the Gallery in a Garden Barnes Foundation Building officially opened on May 19, 2012

Close to five years in the making, the Gallery in a Garden Barnes Foundation Building officially opened on May 19, 2012. The design was predicated on the arrangement of the galleries within the original building and a desire to invite new programs into the scheme, such as a garden and classrooms. In keeping with the solar orientation of the galleries, the rooms will face south along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, offering a view of the London plane trees along the road. The Collection Gallery has been designed with simplified detail to provide better luminosity for the artwork.

In 2007, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects received the commission to design .

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Originally housed in a Paul Cret gallery in an arboretum in Merion, Pennsylvania, the Barnes Foundation collection is.In 2012, we published The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in A Gallery with Skira Rizzoli

Originally housed in a Paul Cret gallery in an arboretum in Merion, Pennsylvania, the Barnes Foundation collection is re-located to a 93,000 SF, LEED Platinu. In 2012, we published The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in A Gallery with Skira Rizzoli. This book provides a comprehensive description and behind-the-scenes look into the architectural evolution of the Barnes Foundation’s new building.

A comprehensive description and behind-the-scenes look into the architectural evolution of the Barnes Foundation’s new building in downtown Philadelphia. In 2007, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects received the commission to design the new Barnes Foundation building, an enviable project that was surrounded both by controversy and the excitement of increasing access to one of America’s premier collections of post-impressionist art, amassed by Dr. Albert C. Barnes in the early twentieth century. The book presents photographs and drawings highlighting the new building’s sensitivity to the ideology of Dr. Barnes and the creativity of Paul Cret, who designed the foundation’s gallery in Merion. In the new facility, the Merion galleries are faithfully reproduced at the same scale with similar materials and are seamlessly integrated into the larger new building—a refined modernist masterpiece surrounded by grounds designed by landscape architect Laurie Olin.

Comments

Dagdatus Dagdatus
Beautiful and thorough
Ishnllador Ishnllador
This book is an excellent resource to review / read before a visit to the new Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia. Written by the architects, it provides many insights into the site plan of the new campus, space layout of the buildings and detailed aesthetic considerations both inside and out. Specifically, it details how nature is embraced in the visit experience, how the stone building materials were selected, and the use of and management of light and space. It also points out numerous design nuances that the first-time visitor would never notice at the Barnes, or would not initially know why they are important. And, from personal experience, I can say this extreme attention to detail in all aspects of design and construction is one of the things a visitor will note and enjoy. The campus and buildings are themselves a work of art. Finally, this book also provides a look at the dynamic interplay between architect and client in the completion of such an important, high visibility project. I recommend it!
Steep Steep
As an architect I love pretty pictures, but I love process more. This book has both, and it's wonderful.
Fordrelis Fordrelis
This book is a fascinating exploration of the architects' vision and process. I just ordered my second copy to give as a gift, following a visit to the Barnes. I responded at length (in the form of a comment) to the review of "Alex" above (the 3-star review) . . . sorry it doesn't show unless you click on "1 Comment" which appears below his review. I felt it would be truly unfortunate if his review discouraged people from going to see the new building which houses the astonishing Barnes Collection (one of my favorite collections of art in the US--or, indeed, anywhere) or from buying this wonderful book. I have no connection with the Barnes Collection--other than that I have loved it since my mother first brought me to see it when I was a child. I have returned many times since. Seeing the new building and reading about the architects' process was a revelation.
Kazimi Kazimi
Absolute fan of Tod Williams and Billie Tsein's work! I have been to the foundation and it is a fantastic book - glad I bought it!
Porgisk Porgisk
Excelent, read after visiting the museum,and then visit the museum again
funike funike
Bought for a gift. We already have a copy.
Architecture is one of my main hobbies: I read books, visit buildings in the US and Europe, and had the pleasure to get two of my projects built.

In my view this is an outstanding book: lucid prose, clear presentation of the architectural problems and solutions, straightforward illustrations. The authors (and architects) describe the planning of a relocated museum, reconstruction of the old gallery rooms in a new building, in a completely different environment, new visitor and museum functions, improved lighting, and new landscaping in plain language, easily understandable, without fuss.

What is even better is that Williams and Tsien did not wreck the Barnes Collection.

The Barnes Collection in Merion was on top of my list of museum favorites: A superb collection of paintings, shown in Barnes' idiosyncratic presentation, interspersed with hardware beyond imagination, and backed by a private park. After every museum visit, we relaxed in the park, strolling and recovering from the effort of experiencing the many masterworks.

Why this jewel of a museum had to be moved to Philadelphia is still incomprehensible to me.

William and Tsien state at the outset that they were not familiar with the Barnes Collection. Swallowing the requirement to recreate the same rooms, with the same arrangements for artworks, in a new location, must have been one of the oddest tasks an architect could face. Understanding the function of the arboretum (a place to come down to earth, after viewing all the masterpieces), and recreating it in an urban setting, is to me a sign of sheer genius. In the new building, the empty great hall with an abstract light source in the ceiling (light court) and the interspersed sections with trees (gallery gardens) manage to meet the visitor's need to relax between phases of intense excitement.

The key to a successful museum project is to allow visitors to view the artwork under the best possible conditions - not getting bumped by other visitors, or having the view of paintings blocked. Lighting is absolutely the most important consideration, and the planning and solutions are presented in a matter-of-fact way. A large central window in the main room was constructed of low-transmission glass. Natural light is brought into the upstairs rooms by clerestories with controllable light flow. Overall Williams and Tsien improved the lighting substantially as compared to the building in Merion.

Interior details are shown in many photographs. Stone facings were imported from Israel, hand-chiseled, and mixed with textiles - I loved the interiors. The same stone, with smooth surfaces, was used on the outside, and seemed so much less attractive to me.

The only objection one might have is that there is no information whatever on the financial aspects of this project. I imagine that the foundation board may have excluded any discussion.

Two caveats:

This is not a coffee table book that makes you shiver with amazement (e.g. Rykvert and Schezen's book on Louis Kahn, Abrams 2001); it is an extremely interesting and useful working document. Highly recommended if you want to deal with architecture in a concrete manner.

The new Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia is not a temple to the architectural deities Williams and Tsien (I was not floored by the looks of the buildings, but liked the water features and the plantings on the Parkway). It is a most successful new museum for the art which Dr. Barnes collected and exhibited in Marion.