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eBook Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City ePub

eBook Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City ePub

by Tristram Hunt

  • ISBN: 0805080260
  • Category: Architecture
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Tristram Hunt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books; 1st ed edition (December 27, 2005)
  • Pages: 592
  • ePub book: 1110 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1656 kb
  • Other: lit lrf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 461

Description

With learning, energy, and sophistication, Tristram Hunt draws together a wonderful history of the buildings .

With learning, energy, and sophistication, Tristram Hunt draws together a wonderful history of the buildings of that era. I strongly recommend this book. This is an exciting book for people interested in urban planning and urban history.

Originally published: London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (pages 529-551) and index. From Manchester's deadly cotton works to London's literary salons, an exploration of how the Victorians created the modern city. Yet, as historian Hunt argues, the Coketowns of the 1800s were far more than a monstrous landscape of factories and tenements.

from the civic to the municipal, and greater powers over health, education and housing; and finally at the end of the century, the retreat from the urban to the rural ideal, led by William Morris and.

Yet, as historian Tristram Hunt argues in this powerful new history, the Coketowns of the 1800s were far more than a monstrous landscape of factories and tenements. By 1851, more than half of Britain's population lived in cities, and even as these pioneers confronted a frightening new way of life, they produced an urban flowering that would influence the shape of cities for generations to come

Building Jerusalem book.

Building Jerusalem book.

Tristram Hunt does justice to the great cities built by the Victorians in Building Jerusalem, says Stephen . The Victorian city, with its blustering buildings and confident institutions, is one of our great achievements, yet we retain a queasy ambiguity about its value

Tristram Hunt does justice to the great cities built by the Victorians in Building Jerusalem, says Stephen Bayley. The Victorian city, with its blustering buildings and confident institutions, is one of our great achievements, yet we retain a queasy ambiguity about its value. Maybe this is because the same culture that produced a monumental civic architecture to humble Athens and Rome, art galleries, libraries, museums, railways and flushing lavatories also gave us child sexual slavery and foetid slums.

Andrew Saint writes: Building Jerusalem is a passionate, kaleidoscopic and wilful defence of the Victorian city. It is a book of broad scope and vivid detail. The ferocious phase of the Victorian city, best represented by Manchester, comes first in Hunt’s affections. After 1850 there follows the reform of local politics, welfare, infrastructure and architecture, exemplified above all by Birmingham and Joseph Chamberlain.

The Fall of Public Man Alain Corbin, Time Desire and Horror: Towards a History of the Senses Google Scholar. Negotiating Boundaries of the City: Migration, Ethnicity, and Gender in Britain. Studies in Migration and Diaspora. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2008. Democratic Subjects: The Self and the Social in Nineteenth-Century England.

com User, February 1, 2006.

Электронная книга "Marx's General: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels", Tristram Hunt

Электронная книга "Marx's General: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels", Tristram Hunt. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Marx's General: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

From Manchester's deadly cotton works to London's literary salons, a brilliant exploration of how the Victorians created the modern city Since Charles Dickens first described Coketown in Hard Times, the nineteenth-century city, born of the industrial revolution, has been a byword for deprivation, pollution, and criminality. Yet, as historian Tristram Hunt argues in this powerful new history, the Coketowns of the 1800s were far more than a monstrous landscape of factories and tenements. By 1851, more than half of Britain's population lived in cities, and even as these pioneers confronted a frightening new way of life, they produced an urban flowering that would influence the shape of cities for generations to come. Drawing on diaries, newspapers, and classic works of fiction, Hunt shows how the Victorians translated their energy and ambition into realizing an astonishingly grand vision of the utopian city on a hill--the new Jerusalem. He surveys the great civic creations, from town halls to city squares, sidewalks, and even sewers, to reveal a story of middle-class power and prosperity and the liberating mission of city life. Vowing to emulate the city-states of Renaissance Italy, the Victorians worked to turn even the smokestacks of Manchester and Birmingham into sites of freedom and art. And they succeeded--until twentieth-century decline transformed wealthy metropolises into dangerous inner cities. An original history of proud cities and confident citizens, Building Jerusalem depicts an unrivaled era that produced one of the great urban civilizations of Western history.

Comments

Quendant Quendant
Historians must take an ideological stance or they become but poor reporters of facts. Hunt's research and approach is brilliant. Whether you agree with him on his interpretation of the facts is your business. Great history is written with great passion. This book is a very fine example of the rare art of the historian.
Still In Mind Still In Mind
I came to "Building Jerusalem" through a book review by Jonathan Schwarz in "The Atlantic Monthly", Jan-Feb 2006, and Mr. Schwartz did not lead me astray. This is an exciting book for people interested in urban planning and urban history. It is especially exhilarating for people who know these Midlands cities, and it is a must-read for people old enough to remember them before urban renewal destroyed the visual integrity of city centers.

Mr. Hunt takes as his starting point and his title from the religious notion that man yearns toward perfection and that removing easy access to vice will curb bestial nature. How we live will make us better people (or more commonly, how they live will make them better people). Betterment as social ideal, coupled with rich men wanting monuments, public health departments wanting sewage systems, and factory owners wanting ready access to labourers and markets, led to massive reconfiguration of English cities in the nineteenth century.

Mr. Hunt's attention to telling the story to non-specialists makes this a fat book, and if you are interested in the themes he presents, you will be fascinated.
WUNDERKIND WUNDERKIND
Britain was the first country on Earth to witness the Industrial Revolution -- and my, oh, my was it ugly! Millions of economically displaced families moved from the countryside and Ireland to work in the burgeoning cotton, metal and coal industries during the early 19th century. Cities like Manchester, Birmingham and Leeds were completely overwhelmed by the human influx, becoming breeding places for mass poverty and the disease that followed. The living conditions were nothing less than murderous -- as bad as anything in the Third World today.

In this college-level book, Tristram Hunt chronicles how British society responded to the crisis. "Building Jerusalem" is an intellectual history of the ideas that transformed squalor-bound urban areas into a new organizational model based on civic pride and public works. We learn how the Romantic vision of medieval chivalry (as retold in popular novels like "Ivanhoe") influenced the ground-level urban activists -- along with powerful forms of Christian compassion and nationalism.

The Victorian urban reform movement succeeded in many areas, but fell short in others. Ultimately, the coming of the 20th century undermined many of the core ideas that sustained the movement and led to a new focus on suburban development instead.

Hunt's writing is lively, particularly in the first 200 pages, and his research is impeccable. Unfortunately, the second half of the book drags a bit as he delves too deeply into the biographies of certain key characters, like John Ruskin. I would have split this book into two different volumes, the first from 1770 to about 1880, the second volume from 1880 to 2000. The photos are valuable, but we need more maps, illustrations and graphics to understand the true nature of this earth-shaking transformation. Bottom line: Worth reading, but could be better organized.
Dusar Dusar
Hunt, a university lecturer and government adviser, has written a considerable work, based on years of research, but flawed by its pro-Labour, anti-working class perspective. He quotes John Prescott, "We are all middle class" - true enough of Labour Ministers and their cronies.

But the world's first industries and the world's first industrial cities were built by the world's first working class. In this book, trade unions are almost invisible - a walk-on part when Manchester Town Hall opened in 1878, a demand for better conditions for Glasgow's tramworkers, but Hunt cannot see the working class's role in creating industry, only `restrictive labour practices'.

He approves the Victorian economist James Mill's arrogant and idealist claim that the capitalist class contains `the heads that invent, and the hands that execute' and `the men who in fact think for the rest of the world'. The reactionary diatribes of Carlyle, Pugin and Ruskin, and the bourgeois triumphalism of a Macaulay, were equally idealist.

Too often, Victorian capitalists had prestige projects built, at the cost of urban development, putting palaces before people. Self-styled merchant princes, seeing themselves as the new Medici, romanced `Saxon self-government' and smugly rejected planning for public health.

The Victorian ruling class saw London as the imperial city, with its irredeemable natives. Hunt sees people's moves to the suburbs and to garden cities as wilful failures to solve London's problems, and joins Betjeman, Orwell, Williams-Ellis and Priestley in snobbish hatred of the suburbs, despite acknowledging that many people do want to live there.

Hunt calls for a restoration of local democracy, noting that in the 1890s, Londoners elected 12,000 of their fellow-citizens to run hospitals, schools and transport; now 36,000 quangocrats decide for us. Successive governments' rate capping, surcharging and cash limits have weakened the `innovative local government and civic pride' that Hunt celebrates, yet he ignores completely the biggest current threat to local (and national) democracy - Labour's EU-driven regionalisation policy.

He applauds the knowledge economy - though isn't all productive work knowledge-based? But we also need steel, ships, vehicles and clothes, which we should be producing ourselves, instead of relying on imported goods.