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eBook North European Textiles until AD. 1000 ePub

eBook North European Textiles until AD. 1000 ePub

by Lise Bender Jorgensen

  • ISBN: 8772884169
  • Category: Decorative Arts and Design
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Lise Bender Jorgensen
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Aarhus University Press; 1st edition (December 31, 1992)
  • Pages: 285
  • ePub book: 1398 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1414 kb
  • Other: doc mobi docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 216

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North European Textile. by Lise Bender Jørgensen. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

North European Textile.

North European Textiles until AD 1000. By JørgensenLise Bender. Patent application 2 010 441A. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 1992. Volume 73 - John Peter Wild.

Author: Jorgensen, Lise Bender Title of Source: North European textiles until AD 1000 r. Joanna Sofaer, Lise Bender Jørgensen and Alice Choyke, 2013: Craft Production: Ceramics, Textiles and Bone

Author: Jorgensen, Lise Bender Title of Source: North European textiles until AD 1000 r. More Info: This monograph is now out of print. Joanna Sofaer, Lise Bender Jørgensen and Alice Choyke, 2013: Craft Production: Ceramics, Textiles and Bone. In: A. Harding and H. Fokkens (e., Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age. Oxford: Oxford University, 469-492.

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By Lise Bender Jørgensen. North European Textiles until AD 1000.

by Lise Bender Jorgensen. More by Lise Bender Jorgensen. Creativity in the Bronze Age: Understanding Innovation in Pottery, Textile, and Metalwork Production. Lise Bender Jorgensen.

Textiles in European Archaeology. Papers of the 6th meeting North European symposium arch. Textile production in pre-Roman Italy. textiles 7th-11th May 1995, Borås. GOTARC Series A, Vol. 1, Göteborgs Universitet. INST ARCH KJ Qto BEN and the other NESAT volumes Bender Jørgensen, . Munksgaard, E. (ed. 1992. A rchaeological Textiles in Northern Europe: Report from the 4th NESAT Symposium, 1–5 May 1990 in Copenhagen. INST ARCH KJ GLE also useful on artefacts related to textile production Grömer, K. 2006: Vom Spinnen und Weben, Flechten und Zwirnen. Hinweise zur neolithischen 38.

This book is firstly an enormous catalogue of all textile finds from prehistoric, Roman and medieval contexts in Great Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland and Scandinavia. This data is used to show that the first steps towards organized textile production in northern Europe were taken more than 2,500 years ago, and that the industry that was to centre itself around the English Channel and North Sea coastal areas played an important part in the rise of the Carolingian Empire and Anglo-Saxon England.

Lise Bender Jørgensen Textile, 2013 (Volume 11)). This book offers a wide range of information of prehistoric textiles in a well organized fashion. Textiles and Textile Production in Europe succeeds in giving a comprehensive overview of ancient textile studies in Europe and in the methodology for study of such fragile remains of the past. Information about prehistoric textiles can be extremely difficult to uncover, it is ever so convenient to find an abundance of evidence in one location.

Felt is a textile material that is produced by matting, condensing and . New organizations to support felters sprang up, as well as conferences, and books devoted to guiding new comers. Aarchus: Aarchus University Press, 1992.

Felt is a textile material that is produced by matting, condensing and pressing fibers together. Felt can be made of natural fibers such as wool or animal fur, or from synthetic fibers such as petroleum-based acrylic or acrylonitrile or wood pulp-based rayon  . There is now an International Feltmakers Association with headquarters in the UK, which publishes its own journal, Felt Matters.

This book is firstly an enormous catalogue of all textile finds from prehistoric, Roman and medieval contexts in Great Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland and Scandinavia. This data is used to show that the first steps towards organized textile production in northern Europe were taken more than 2,500 years ago, and that the industry that was to centre itself around the English Channel and North Sea coastal areas played an important part in the rise of the Carolingian Empire and Anglo-Saxon England.