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eBook Math into LATEX: An Introduction to LATEX and AMS-LATEX ePub

eBook Math into LATEX: An Introduction to LATEX and AMS-LATEX ePub

by George Grätzer

  • ISBN: 0817638059
  • Category: Graphic Design
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: George Grätzer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Birkhäuser Boston (November 29, 1995)
  • Pages: 451
  • ePub book: 1497 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1541 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf rtf doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 501

Description

Gra¨tzer, George A. Math into LaTeX : an introduction to LaTeX and .

Gra¨tzer, George A. Math into LaTeX : an introduction to LaTeX and AMS-LaTeX /. George Gra¨tzer. LATEX and AMS-LATEX improved dramatically with the release of the new stan-dard LATEX (called LATEX 2ε) in June of 1994 and the revision of AMS-LATEX (ver-sion . ) in February of 1995. The change in AMS-LATEX is profound. LATEX 2ε made it possible for AMS-LATEX to join the LATEX world. This book introduces LATEX as a tool for mathematical typesetting, and treats AMS-LATEX as a set of enhancements to the standard LATEX, to be used in conjunction with hundreds of other LATEX 2ε enhancements. I am not a TEX expert.

AMS-LATEX was another variant of LATEX

AMS-LATEX was another variant of LATEX. Luckily, George’s frustration working through this nightmare was eased by a lengthy e-mail correspondence with Frank and lots of telephone calls to Michael. The second book, Math into LATEX: An Introduction to LATEX and AMS-LATEX, written in 1995, describes the new LATEX introduced by the LATEX3 team and the AMS typesetting features implemented as extensions of LATEX, called packages.

Math into LaTeX" is for the mathematician, physicist, engineer, scientist, or technical typist who needs to quickly learn how to write and typeset articles and books containing mathematical formulas, and requires a thorough reference book on all aspects of LaTeX and the AMS packages, the enhancements to LaTeX by the American Mathematical Society. Features a section devoted to book publishing and typesetting as well as an introduction to web development from LaTeX

LaTeX is a high-quality typesetting software and is very popular, especially among scientists. as an introduction to web development from LaTeX. Presents a detailed discussion of all aspects of LaT.

LaTeX is a high-quality typesetting software and is very popular, especially among scientists. Math into LATEX: An Introduction to LATEX and AMS-LATEX. 37 MB·181 Downloads·New! as an introduction to web development from LaTeX. Introduction to Insurance Mathematics: Technical and Financial Features of Risk Transfers. 19 MB·9,707 Downloads·New!. Pitacco, Introduction to Insurance Mathematics, Math into LaTeX: an introduction to LaTeX and AM. .

Math Into LaTeX is a book with diffuse purpose - a little bit of introduction for those trying to get into using LaTeX for their mathematical type-setting needs, a little bit of wide coverage on commands needed for many math articles, and plenty of pointing to other references on the Internet and in books. In many ways, it's too diffuse to be useful on a day-to-day basis; even though there's a Quick Finder, a mini-index at the front of the book, the choices don't seem appropriate for what comes up most often in my hair-pulling sessions with a recalcitrant LaTeX (such as fixing.

Gratzer’s book is a solution.

Grätzer's book provides the beginner with a simple, direct approach. Using numerous examples, a formula gallery, sample files, and templates, a short course, Part I, guides the reader through typing text, math formulas, equations, and an article template making it possible to start typing an article with only a few hours time. The rest of this book provides systematic discussion of all aspects of LaTeX and the AMS packages, customization, and introduces two major tools to help compile long bibliographies and indexes.

Math into LaTeX : an introduction to LaTeX and AMS-LaTeX .

Math into LaTeX : an introduction to LaTeX and AMS-LaTeX /. George Gr¨atzer. p. cm. Includes index. AMS-LATEX distills the decades-long experience of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) in publishing mathematical journals and books; it adds to LATEX a host of features related to mathematical typesetting, especially the typesetting of multiline formulas and the production of nely-tuned printed output. Articles written in LATEX (and AMS-LATEX) are accepted for publication by an increasing number of journals, including all the journals of the AMS. Look at the typeset sample articles: sampart. tex (in Appendix C) and intrart. tex (on pages 37–38).

Grätzer G. Math into TeX (Birkhäuser, 1993)(ISBN 0817636374). Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Categories: Computers\Programs: TeX, LaTeX. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Universal algebra. Springer-Verlag New York. George Grätzer (auth.

Math Into LaTeX is for the mathematician, physicist, engineer, scientist, or technical typist who needs to quickly learn how to.

Math Into LaTeX is for the mathematician, physicist, engineer, scientist, or technical typist who needs to quickly learn how to write and typeset articles an.We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone.

A new chapter"A Visual Introduction to MikTeX," an open source implementation of TeX and LaTeX for Windows operating systems

Another new chapter describing amsrefs, a simpler method for formatting references that incorporates and replaces BibTeX data

Integrates a major revision to the amsart document class, along with updated examples

Comments

Malann Malann
This "Math Into LaTeX" book is a good reference book for those persons that need to reference LaTeX document construction and have good examples.
Daiktilar Daiktilar
Math Into LaTeX is a book with diffuse purpose -- a little bit of introduction for those trying to get into using LaTeX for their mathematical type-setting needs, a little bit of wide coverage on commands needed for many math articles, and plenty of pointing to other references on the Internet and in books. In many ways, it's too diffuse to be useful on a day-to-day basis; even though there's a Quick Finder, a mini-index at the front of the book, the choices don't seem appropriate for what comes up most often in my hair-pulling sessions with a recalcitrant LaTeX (such as fixing the margin at the top of the page).
The first section, titled A Short Course, is a simple 63-page guide, walking one through the creation of a LaTeX file, from a 22-line simple note, to adding individual math terms, to producing large formulas, to dealing with the inevitable error messages, even through running the LaTeX program. However, it's not really explained how to deal with the dvi file that comes out of the program -- a vague description that a video driver is used to view a dvi file is given in this short course, but the real information is to be found scattered throughout the book. This is a failing shared with =many= TeX and LaTeX books; one gets in lots of trouble for all that is =not= written down.
A quick overview of the remaining sections: in Text and Math one finds the meat of the book -- how to organize text regions, whether in paragraphs or lists; dealing with fonts; how to organize formulas and symbols; how to align equations and their different parts. I use this section as a reference almost constantly in typing up math articles. Section III, Document Structure, does a quick look at the overall skeleton of a LaTeX document, and in particular looks at AMS articles. Customization covers some of the more used customizing options, like changing spacing and counters of list items. The Long Documents section looks at three things: making bibliographies, making indexes, and pulling separate files together for one large document (like books). The last section, Math and the Web, talks about various conversions one can use to put up a version of LaTeX documents on the Internet, and how to deal with some PDF issues, but it's rather a spare section. The appendices, of course, have the standard charts for math symbols and European Accents, lists of fonts, and dealing with conversions. Check out the Bibliography - if you get a hold of some of the other LaTeX tomes, you will see that it's hard to find a better one than this one (though that doesn't mean a better one can't be written).
That said, this has turned out to be one of the most useful LaTeX books I have ever used (the absolutely most useful was a very short book printed by SIAM, and is for people who don't need help with the bare bones). I own three LaTeX books right now (this one, The Latex Companion, and The Latex Graphics Companion). Of the three, this one is the most useful in my day-to-day writing of mathematics in LaTeX. The problem with the Companion books is that they are useful for the esoteric topics they cover, which would be hard to figure out on one's own, but they really don't address nuts & bolts issues like Math Into LaTeX does. If you can only have one LaTeX book, you should get this one; if you have three LaTex books, you should still get it, for there are few other LaTeX books which make things so understandable and covers so many useful topics.
DarK-LiGht DarK-LiGht
I have 2004, 3rd printing of this book. I knew nothing about LaTeX before, but, using this book, I have learned how to write mathematical articles with LaTeX. This is not an absolutely perfect book, but a very good one, and I definitely recommend it to a person who needs to learn how to write mathematical articles in LaTeX. Pacific.
Gholbirdred Gholbirdred
I assume that you would not be looking at this book's entry in the catalogue if you did not know already that TeX is the best available tool for typesetting manuscripts involving a lot of mathematical formulae. This book presents LaTeX2e, the current "industry standard", which combines LaTeX with AMS-TeX.
The first objective of the book is to get a complete novice started in the shortest amount of time. This is done in Part 1, which contains all one needs to typeset a simple mathematical text. Part 2 gives a very detailed description of typesetting text and mathematics, pointing out the differences between LaTeX-derived commands and AMS-TeX codes. This is done very carefully and clearly. The structure of all sections is basically the same: overview of the contents, definitions of the commands covered, their scope, examples, typical errors (together with error commands generated by LaTeX when something goes wrong), more advanced topics. This part covers pretty much any scenario you are likely to encounter typesetting a mathematical document.
Part 3 goes into details of LaTeX document structure, including a synopsis of various document classes and how best to use them. Part 4 explains how to customize LaTeX, Part 5 treats long documents and BiBTeX, the bibliographic database. Final part, Part 6, treats LaTeX and the Web, mainly by poiting out various Web sites that can help you if you are serious about posting your work on the Web.
The book is very good at what it sets out to explain. There are, however, certain topics the author decided to leave out. There is no description of the picture environment, which although not exactly user friedly, is useful from time to time. The slide environment for producing transparencies is not described either, and I think this could have been included without too much trouble. To me this is a slightly more serious drawback than the first omission.
I give the book five stars for the following reason. This is a book that teaches you how to produce beautiful scientific manuscripts rather than how to rewrite LaTeX. The book itself is a very nice looking document, and so serves as a very good example of what is possible to achieve with LaTeX, if you follow the author's advice.
Naa Naa
To write a mathematics formula intensive article or thesis, one has two possibilities: either using a MS-Word-like software, or using LaTeX. There is no doubt: even if LaTeX made documents have a much more professional aspect, the use of this typesetting package is not so trivial! Hence, unlike traditional word processing software, a companion textbook is essential. Among the documentation available (for free) on the web, or other textbooks I went thru at the library, I found "Math into LaTeX" the most valuable introduction and reference book to LaTeX. I have to say that I bought it because once at the bookstore, among the books available on the shelf, it appears to me to be the one with the best price-quality ratio (it is extremely nicely crafted... and made with LaTeX). Once at home, the beginner I was finely understood the philosophy associated with this typesetting package, and at last, I was able to write the 3-page document I wanted. Now I consider I have become an *intermediate* user of LaTeX, and this book is still the one I put on the back burner; it realy constitute the concise and ergonomic reference I wanted. To conclude, perhaps the most valuable outcomes of this book are the rules and tips given all along the pages by Gratzer. If you follow them, I ensure you will proceed efficiently.