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eBook Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams ePub

eBook Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams ePub

by Bradley Collins

  • ISBN: 0813335957
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Bradley Collins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Westview Press; 1st edition (August 31, 2001)
  • Pages: 280
  • ePub book: 1217 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1499 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf txt lit
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 187

Description

Home Browse Books Book details, Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and. I have tried to introduce nuance and complexity into this polarized conception of van Gogh and Gauguin-without entirely dismantling the mythical oppositions.

Home Browse Books Book details, Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and. Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

In his second book, Van Gogh and Gauguin, Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams, Collins certainly makes good on his promise. Virtually every sentence in this book is a bullet. Exceptionally readable and zestful, Bradley Collins never fails to move the reader along merrily during this delightful tour de force

Van Gogh and Gauguin explores the artists' intertwined lives from a psychoana. BRADLEY COLLINS is an art historian and an instructor at the Parsons School of Design at The New School University.

Van Gogh and Gauguin explores the artists' intertwined lives from a psychoana. He has written on Renaissance as well as 19th- and 20th-century art for Art Journal, Art in America, The Village Voice, and other publications. He is also the author of Leonardo, Psychoanalysis, and Art History.

Van Gogh: Zundert to Paris - Gauguin: Lima to Pont-Aven - Van Gogh in Paris and first encounters with Gauguin - Jean . Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-256) and index. The Original book is as like this. The original books is too bright.

Van Gogh: Zundert to Paris - Gauguin: Lima to Pont-Aven - Van Gogh in Paris and first encounters with Gauguin - Jean Valjean and the Buddhist Monk: Van Gogh.

Van Gogh And Gauguin book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Van Gogh And Gauguin: Electric Arguments And Utopian Dreams as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Van Gogh And Gauguin: Electric Arguments And Utopian Dreams as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Van Gogh and Gauguin: Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams. The Yellow House: Van Gogh, Gauguin, and Nine Turbulent Weeks in Provence. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2001. New York: Mariner Books, 2008. Margolis Maurer, Naomi. The Pursuit of Spiritual Wisdom: Thought and Art of Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1998.

BRADLEY COLLINS is an art historian and an instructor at the Parsons School of Design at The New School University. He has written on Renaissance as well as 19th- and 20th-century art for Art Journal, Art in America, The Village Voice, and other publications

BRADLEY COLLINS is an art historian and an instructor at the Parsons School of Design at The New School University.

Van Gogh And Gauguin

Van Gogh And Gauguin. Although Vincent van Gogh's and Paul Gauguin's artistic collaboration in the south of France lasted no more than two months, their stormy relationship has continued to fascinate art historians, biographers, and psychoanalysts as well as film-makers and the general public. Van Gogh and Gauguin explores the artists' intertwined lives from a psychoana.

Although Vincent van Gogh's and Paul Gauguin's artistic collaboration in the South of France lasted no more than two months, their stormy relationship has continued to fascinate art historians, biographers and psychoanalysts as well.

Although Vincent van Gogh's and Paul Gauguin's artistic collaboration in the South of France lasted no more than two months, their stormy relationship has continued to fascinate art historians, biographers and psychoanalysts as well as fil.

Bradley Collins's Van Gogh and Gauguin is a psychoanalyst's interpretation of the relationship between the two artists, especially during the months in 1888 they spent living in the same house in Arles, southern France. The intensity of their time together is indicated by the way it ended, with van Gogh cutting off his ear after a violent argument with Gauguin, presenting it to a prostitute, and returning home to sleep in his own blood. Gauguin fled to Paris, and they never met again, though they exchanged several letters before van Gogh's suicide 18 months later.

Although Vincent van Gogh's and Paul Gauguin's artistic collaboration in the South of France lasted no more than two months, their stormy relationship has continued to fascinate art historians, biographers and psychoanalysts as well as film makers and the general public. Two great 19th century figures with powerful and often clashing sensibilities, they shared a house, worked side by side, drank, caroused and argued passionately about art. Their brief venture together, richly documented in the artists' letters and paintings, would be compelling enough even if it had not culminated in the catastrophe of van Gogh's life - his ear cutting. This traumatic climax to van Gogh's and Gauguin's weeks spent in the "Yellow House" in Arles has raised profound questions about the nature of their relationship and about their behavior before and after van Gogh's self-mutilation. Van Gogh and Gauguin will explore the artists' intertwined lives from a psychoanalytic perspective in order to draw a nuanced and sophisticated picture of the artists' dealings with each other. The book will also examine crucial art historical issues such as the aesthetic convictions that both united and divided the two men, and the extent to which they influenced each other's art.

Comments

Coiron Coiron
I couldnt’t make it through the entire book - the psychoanalysis takes too many liberties. The writing was dry. I also think the author makes too many assumptions and “diagnoses” without adequate evidence.
Akirg Akirg
Bradley Collins first suggested in his book on Leonardo da Vinci that psychoanalysis had great untapped potential in its application to the art history and the analysis of individual artworks. In his second book, Van Gogh and Gauguin, Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams, Collins certainly makes good on his promise. Virtually every sentence in this book is a bullet. Exceptionally readable and zestful, Bradley Collins never fails to move the reader along merrily during this delightful tour de force. The section on Van Gogh leads off and with a wealth of primary material, letters, early sketches, notes and even recollections by contemporaries and other artists, Collins nails his powerful points with clarity and conviction. Van Gogh's conflicts are clearly linked to earlier infantile repressed syndromes which are then in turn brought into connection with his artworks. Collins is never dogmatic. He gives the reader freedom to doubt and hold back. The Gauguin section has less of an overwhelming primary material avalanche because we lack the enormous correspondence. Collins disarmingly admits this problem and comfortably proceeds within the limitations of the evidence. At all times, Collins wide ranging erudition in art history shines. His polished prose never has the feel of jargon yet he sent me to the dictionary a number of times and he will stretch the reader frequently. The choice of illustrations is superb and extremely helpful in supporting not only Collins' closely reasoned Freudian position but in enveloping the reader in this wonderful aesthetic journey. Collins use of footnotes is judicious and illuminating. One example: In one footnote Collins notes that at the time of Van Gogh's ear mutilation there was a concurrent rage among Japanese prostitutes for amputation and gift of a fingertip to keep the wandering hearts of a wavering client, and since Van Gogh like many of the avant garde artists of his day was a fanatic admirer of Japanese culture it is quite possible that he knew of this bizarre masochist practice when he cut his ear. Collins has mastered the art of putting more in his footnotes than many of his contemporary authors manage to put in their entire books.
This is a must read for anyone interested in art history, psychoanalysis or general cultural debate. One can only hope that Collins will continue to write on the topic of psychoanalysis and art history, which although it is not an especially popular topic, it is a field in which Bradley Collins may now be justly considered perhaps America's leading specialist. In my opinion, there were signs of genius on every page of Van Gogh and Gauguin, Electric Arguments and Utopian Dreams. Bravo to Collins. A book of such quality is only encountered perhaps once a decade. It is a real gem.