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eBook The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa ePub

eBook The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa ePub

by Michael Kimmelman

  • ISBN: 0143037331
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Michael Kimmelman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics); Reprint edition (July 25, 2006)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1112 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1248 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 456

Description

Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic for the New York Times, takes a very down-to-earth tour of the nature of visual art and its contemporary issues in THE ACCIDENTAL MASTERPIECE

Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic for the New York Times, takes a very down-to-earth tour of the nature of visual art and its contemporary issues in THE ACCIDENTAL MASTERPIECE. This is a book that reaches out to the general reader, beguiling with anecdotes and a willingness to define terms and issues plainly without oversimplification. Kimmelman welcomes everyone to the table of art, not just the cognoscenti. His enthusiasm for artists and the place of art in our lives is infectious. The first essay inspired the title of the collection

Kimmelman regards art, like all serious human endeavors, as a passage through which a larger view of life may come more clearly into focus. His book is a kind of adventure or journey. It carries the message that many of us may not yet have learned how to recognize the art in our own lives.

Kimmelman regards art, like all serious human endeavors, as a passage through which a larger view of life may come more clearly into focus. To do so is something of an art itself. A few of the characters Kimmelman describes, like Bonnard and Chardin, are great artists. But others are explorers and obscure obsessives, paint-by-numbers enthusiasts, amateur shutterbugs, and collectors of strange odds and ends.

The Accidental Masterpiece book. But what makes this book more unusual than other contemporary art books is the way Kimmelman interweaves art and life

The Accidental Masterpiece book. But what makes this book more unusual than other contemporary art books is the way Kimmelman interweaves art and life. No longer does one feel that art exists only in a sterile white box environment or in the rarefied sanctuaries of museums. No longer is the artist another contemporary celebrity. Art and Kimmelman's style of writing make this one of the more readable books on artists. The reader is able to experience both the personalities and the artistic passions of a wide range of artists.

The Art of Life and Vice Versa', the subtitle said - something I have long aspired to understand is the interplay of art and life in its many facets and influences. According to author Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic for the New York Times and frequent author on art and cultural topics, studying art and those who devote themselves to art 'provides us with clues about how to live our own lives more fully

Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic, The New York Times, in conversation with Deborah Ziska, chief of press and . The Accidental Masterpiece serves as a kind of adventure or journey, leading to a larger view of life through art.

Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic, The New York Times, in conversation with Deborah Ziska, chief of press and public information, National Gallery of Art. To honor the publication of The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa, Michael Kimmelman joined Deborah Ziska to discuss the inspiration for and purpose of his latest book. In this conversation recorded on September 24, 2005 at the National Gallery of Art, Kimmelman explains the desire to write about art that had changed his life. 08/05/14. His book carries the message that many of us may not yet have learned how to recognize the art in our own lives. From publisher description. Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

Kimmelman reminds us of the Wunderkammer, the cabinet of wonders - the rage in seventeenth-century Europe and a metaphor for the art of life. The Accidental Masterpiece is a kind of literary Wunderkammer, filled with lively surprises and philosophical musings. It will inspire readers to imagine their own personal cabinet of wonders.

Author: Michael Kimmelman. Genre: Art. Publisher: Penguin Books. Compensation paid to us in the form of referral fees DOES NOT imply that companies wishing to appear on our pages are receiving any form of endorsement from us. Got it. Do you wish to advertise with us?

The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa (Penguin Press, 2005). City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, introduction by Michael Kimmelman (Harper Collins, 2016).

The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa (Penguin Press, 2005). Portraits: Talking with Artists at the Met, the Modern, the Louvre, and Elsewhere (Random House, 1998). Oscar Niemeyer (Assouline, 2009). Studies in Modern Art: The Museum of Modern Art at Mid-Century (Harry N. Abrams, 1994). More Things Like This (e Books, 2009). Playing Piano for Pleasure by Charles Cooke, foreword by Michael Kimmelman (Skyhorse, 2011).

Yet Kimmelman's subtitle, "On the Art of Life and Vice Versa," will probably attract readers who believe that art is, in some nebulous way, good for . The book comes alive when Kimmelman's own experiences take center stage.

Yet Kimmelman's subtitle, "On the Art of Life and Vice Versa," will probably attract readers who believe that art is, in some nebulous way, good for you. Kimmelman himself appears to believe this, telling us that "this book is, in part, about how creating, collecting and even just appreciating art can make living a daily masterpiece. He walks up Cézanne's beloved Montagne St. Victoire and fails to find the Sublime, leaving him to wonder at his own disappointment and its historical as well as personal causes.

A New York Times bestseller—a dazzling and inspirational survey of how art can be found and appreciated in everyday lifeMichael Kimmelman, the prominent New York Times writer and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, is known as a deep and graceful writer across the disciplines of art and music and also as a pianist who understands something about the artist's sensibility from the inside. Readers have come to expect him not only to fill in their knowledge about art but also to inspire them to think about connections between art and the larger world - which is to say, to think more like an artist. Kimmelman's many years of contemplating and writing about art have brought him to this wise, wide-ranging, and long-awaited book.

It explores art as life's great passion, revealing what we can learn of life through pictures and sculptures and the people who make them. It assures us that art - points of contact with the exceptional that are linked straight to the heart - can be found almost anywhere and everywhere if only our eyes are opened enough to recognize it. Kimmelman regards art, like all serious human endeavors, as a passage through which a larger view of life may come more clearly into focus. His book is a kind of adventure or journey.

It carries the message that many of us may not yet have learned how to recognize the art in our own lives. To do so is something of an art itself. A few of the characters Kimmelman describes, like Bonnard and Chardin, are great artists. But others are explorers and obscure obsessives, paint-by-numbers enthusiasts, amateur shutterbugs, and collectors of strange odds and ends. Yet others, like Charlotte Solomon, a girl whom no one considered much of an artist but who secretly created a masterpiece about the world before her death in Auschwitz, have reserved spots for themselves in history, or not, with a single work that encapsulates a whole life.

Kimmelman reminds us of the Wunderkammer, the cabinet of wonders - the rage in seventeenth-century Europe and a metaphor for the art of life. Each drawer of the cabinet promises something curious and exotic, instructive and beautiful, the cabinet being a kind of ideal, self-contained universe that makes order out of the chaos of the world. The Accidental Masterpiece is a kind of literary Wunderkammer, filled with lively surprises and philosophical musings. It will inspire readers to imagine their own personal cabinet of wonders.

Comments

Biaemi Biaemi
Michael Kimmelman, chief art critic for the New York Times, takes a very down-to-earth tour of the nature of visual art and its contemporary issues in THE ACCIDENTAL MASTERPIECE. This is a book that reaches out to the general reader, beguiling with anecdotes and a willingness to define terms and issues plainly without oversimplification. Kimmelman welcomes everyone to the table of art, not just the cognoscenti. His enthusiasm for artists and the place of art in our lives is infectious.

The first essay inspired the title of the collection. Kimmelman sorts through the work and circumstances of Pierre Bonnard (1867 - 1947), whose career and life took a permanent turn the day he glimpsed a pretty young woman on the street. She became his muse and often his tormenter, his model and wife. From Bonnard he moves onto the rise of photographic technology and, with its proliferation, the rise of the amateur on the art scene. Then onto how we define and are moved by beauty, which he reflects upon while panting up mountains that have stirred great painters but belatedly release an epiphany for him. He addresses conceptual art next ("The Art of Making Art Without Lifting A Finger"), and then collecting, then finding oneself (and art) when lost, and then the changing attitudes toward figurative rendering, especially nudes, while profiling Philip Pearlstein in particular. "The Art of the Pilgrimage" heads to the land art out west and the last chapter concludes with art that depicts ordinary objects--not Warhol's soup cans as one might imagine, but Wayne Thiebaud's depiction of gumball machines and Chardin's painting of a young man blowing a bubble.

This is not a comprehensive introduction to art history and some academics may argue it is not particularly critical, but it generously imparts a lot of knowledge and awe via its conversational tone. It is a pleasure joining an insider for a special tour of his world.
Shak Shak
This book is quite an enjoyable read. Throughout it are bits of travel writing, memoir, and biography, where Kimmelman relates artistic notions to daily life. His prose is witty and clear, so that one focuses more on the meaning than on complicated language. The chapters are divided into separate anecdotal topics, with such fascinating titles as, "The Art of Collecting Lightbulbs" and "The Art of Finding Yourself When You're Lost". Like most books, however, there are slower moments, such as "The Art of the Pilgrimage" chapter. I just skimmed through it and moved on to other sections that held more meaning for me. Overall, this book is one that I will reread. I look forward to discovering further insight from it, and in the meantime will work to apply some of its premise to my own life.
Agantrius Agantrius
This book has changed my life! Mr. Kimmelman's urbane discussions have enhanced my understanding of the impulse behind my own enthusiasm for objects and arrangements and for the place of art in my life. I wish I had had the book years ago.

Mr. Kimmelman has a superb, almost magical talent for transporting a reader to places and people he has visited as well as to times when his imagination -- informed by an encyclopedic knowledge of writers past and present -- fills in the gaps.

He takes us to a painter's studio darkened by black curtains where Philip Pearlstein transforms models into geometrical compositions; on an exhausting climb up Cezanne's Montagne Sainte-Victoire, where, to his chagrin, he finds a group of elderly French ladies there before him; for an early-morning walk with Pierre Bonnard at his home in southern France, where he lives with an impossible wife; to Antarctica with Frank Hurley, the fearless Australian photographer who captured the romance of the cold south when he sailed with Shackleton on the Endurance; on a near-death experience in Utah, where he had gone to visit a Matthew Barney sculpture in the salt flats in the winter and found himself in chest-high icy water in total darkness after volunteering to find help when car and cell phone failed.

Chapter titles provide clues to how he makes the art experience apparent, i.e., The Art of Making Art Without Lifting a Finger, The Art of Collecting Light Bulbs, The Art of Maximizing Your Time, The Art of Having a Lofty Perspective, The Art of Finding Yourself When You're Lost. As for the last, this book has made me feel "found". I have heard many lectures by eminent art historians--among them Erwin Panofsky at Princeton and Seymour Slive at Harvard--yet not until I read Mr. Kimmelman did I learn to pay attention, live life more alertly, and embrace the art in my daily life.

Mr. Kimmelman, an art critic whose opinions I would like to hear about everything, is a charming companion -- insightful, funny, eloquent, utterly without pretense, and a fountain of perfectly placed observations from past writers, from Nabokov and Proust to Heine, Hobbes, and Hegel. He has created a conversational genre all his own, one that is both moving and joyful.
Jode Jode
Very fun reading, and he touches on some of the big guns in art today, ones that are often difficult to describe, much less review critically. Kimmelman has a smooth, scholarly manner making his work accessible and insightful. If you're looking for rigorous analytical parsing of contemporary art, this is not your destination.
Manazar Manazar
I've read this book more than once, just for the shear pleasure of enjoying the writing style, and getting inside the heads of the people Mr. Kimmelman has profiled here.

If you like a good read, like art, or are simply interested in the variety of ways artists work, this is a great snapshot. I love this book.
Uafrmaine Uafrmaine
I didn't find much substance in this book, more or less a lengthy droll on what is basically common sense.