cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World
eBook The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World ePub

eBook The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World ePub

by David Standish

  • ISBN: 0811828050
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: David Standish
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (November 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 132
  • ePub book: 1383 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1716 kb
  • Other: lit azw rtf docx
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 218

Description

In The Art of Money, David Standish expands our world by exposing money's role in politics, industry . No nature lover will be disappointed in these pages. Standish takes off full speed from there, guiding us around the world as only a knowledgeable and friendly tour guide could.

In The Art of Money, David Standish expands our world by exposing money's role in politics, industry, commerce, nature, art, and sex - yes, even sexy money - . .This beautiful book is a masterpiece of what it means to truly work outside the bo. The exquisite color pictures and stories behind the pictures are as captivating as their countries of origin.

The Art of Money book. Author David Standish begins with a brief, fascinating history of currency, and then presents a striking gallery of international bills from more than 80 countries that corner the market on visual flair.

In The Art of Money, David Standish expands our world by exposing money's role in politics, industry, commerce .This beautiful book is a masterpiece of what it means to truly work outside the box. Of all the people I know, I am the least interested in (or good at) understanding the mechanics of money.

The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World. For years, as an American traveling abroad, I only thought about the local paper money in terms of how many-or how few-pounds, francs, kroner, yen, or pesos equalled one . Published November 1, 2000 by Chronicle Books.

The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from around the World was named one of the ten notable art books of.

The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from around the World was named one of the ten notable art books of the year by the New York Times. Called "entertaining and so informative," by Booklist contributor Mike Tribby, the book focuses on the artistic qualities of currencies around the world. In the process, Standish recounts the history of various countries' currency, including the evolution from coins to paper money.

A beautifully illustrated history of paper currency from around the world offers a close-up look at a variety of international bills, detailing the various people, places, animals, historical events, and other subjects appearing on the currency from some eighty countries.

The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World, by David Standish. The Art of Making Money: The Story of a Master Counterfeiter, by Jason Kersten. Discover the beauty and artistry of currency with this conversational discussion on the history and design of paper money from around the world as well as the United States. Filled with colorful, vibrant illustrations and detailed close-up images. Learn how countries project a desired image on currency. Softcover, 132 pages. Absorbing true story of a brilliant counterfeiter who "made" millions and outwitted the Secret Service until brought down by a betrayal.

THE ART OF MONEY: - The History and Design of Paper Currency From Around the World. Photographs by Tony Armour Photography, Joshua Dunn. Or is it just that we like it so much? This aesthetic question is pondered here by Mr. Standish, who surveys the world's paper currency, noting that James Joyce appears on the Irish $:10 note (smiling, for a change), that an oil refinery is depicted on the Kuwaiti quarter-dinar note and that a ''haphazard poll'' of people working at the Thomas Cook Currency Services established. that the 50-guilder bill from the Netherlands, with its sunflower and bee, is the prettiest of them all.

Understanding the History of Money. A World Without Money. Sometime around 1100 . The first paper currency issued by European governments was actually issued by colonial governments in North America. Money, in some form, has been part of human history for at least the last 3,000 years. the Chinese moved from using actual tools and weapons as a medium of exchange to using miniature replicas of the same tools cast in bronze. Nobody wants to reach into their pocket and impale their hand on a sharp arrow so, over time, these tiny daggers, spades, and hoes were abandoned for the less prickly shape of a circle, which became some of the first coins.

To better appreciate the changing face of cash and to get a crash course on the history of money as an art object, I spoke to David Standish, author of The Art of Money: The History and Design of Paper Currency from Around the World. What’s Wrong With American Money. Worldwide, some of currency is quite wonderful and beautiful and far out and actually quite exotic. United States currency is awful and has been for 100 years, or pretty close. My own take on it is that the design of American money is institutional narcissism.

L'argent. Dinero. Geld. Dough. Whatever you call it, money makes the world go round. The United States is dispensing its first redesigned bills in decades, and the Euro is on the brink of unifying European notes. It's the perfect time for this visual tour of the world's currencies. The various people, places, animals, and historical events depicted on money reflect how countries see themselves—and how they want the rest of world to see them. Author David Standish begins with a brief, fascinating history of currency, and then presents a striking gallery of international bills from more than 80 countries that corner the market on visual flair. The cast of characters on these small canvases is vast—from the Little Prince on French currency to the furry denizens of the rainforest of Madagascar to the obscure Salmon P. Chase, Abraham Lincoln's Secretary of State, on the $10,000 US note (did you know that the US Secret Service originated with Lincoln's efforts to curb counterfeiting during the Civil War?). The Art of Money is an entertaining and lustrous tour of cash for design aficionados, history buffs, travelers, and everybody who handles money (or dreams of handling more).

Comments

Brakora Brakora
Make no mistake -- this is a very attractive book. Frankly, its Jeremy Stout's design and Joshua Dunn's photography that make this book worth buying. Full color images of hundreds of U.S. and foreign paper currencies delight the eye. The layout itself takes its inspiration from money, with security stripes and microprinting, and even page numbers look like currency serial numbers.
The commentary, however, is another issue. While often containing valuable tidbits of the history of paper currency, especially in the section on the United States, "The Art of Money" suffers from failed attempts at humor and an often joyless condescending tone. In an entry on Queen Elizabeth II she's described as looking a little too much like "Prince Charles in drag." The portraits on the redesigned U.S. currencies are described as looking like characters on "South Park".
For most readers, this is not helpful information. In addition, there are too many explanations of images that include the modifiers "must be", "could be", "it would seem so" and modern interpretations of allegorical scenes. Absent an expert's analysis or first-hand knowledge of the reasons behind the placement of images on currency, the author's speculations do not help the novice currency collector and are likely to annoy the professional.
In the final analysis, its the photos of the currencies, and not the captions, that make this book an enjoyable "read." And, as a former articles editor for "Playboy", Mr. Standish might forgive readers if we pick up his book only to look at the pictures.
jorik jorik
The book was according to my expectations. It is my opinion that this book it is a must for any numismatist collecting paper money.
HeonIc HeonIc
the title says it all . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .
Obong Obong
"The Art of Money" is a great book, very informative and beautifully designed. I give it 5 stars even if some critics criticise it, but I think as an introductory publication to the world of paper money it's a great book. The book has two sections: International and United States. There are lots of beautiful illustrations of banknotes world-wide and in categories such as banknotes with trains, ships, heroes, wild animals or even nudes (nude women) on them. It's a great book to start your knowledge in a world of money and I strongly recommend it to a reader. Imagine if you had to buy all these banknotes and payper money yourself to enjoy them you would spend thousands of dollars and now you can have the book for less than twenty bucks......
Gio Gio
Money money money. We all want it. We all need it. We all have it. But how much do we know about the heart and soul of this powerful paper?
In The Art of Money, David Standish expands our world by exposing money's role in politics, industry, commerce, nature, art, and sex - yes, even sexy money - "...an appreciation and celebration of the human form, an admission that we are flesh, after all..."
This beautiful book is a masterpiece of what it means to truly work outside the box. Of all the people I know, I am the least interested in (or good at) understanding the mechanics of money. All I know about money is that when I have some of it in my pocket, I can eat. When I don't have any, I go hungry. I never looked at its colors, pictures, history, and certainly never considered it art. Art? Human nature? Intrigue? Those were the things I was interested in....and The Art of Money contains all these subjects and more. Much more.
The Art of Money captured my interest from the very first page with an amazing reproduction in full color of a 50-Gulden bill, displaying a detailed sunflower and bee: "In indirect but bright homage to van Gogh, the image says, simply being placed on the bill, that they value art and beauty in the Netherlands." This was especially relevant to me because of my Dutch ancestry and my fondness for the Dutch impressionists. But my main interest is animals - what could possibly be written about animals and money? Standish includes an international zoo with four exotic sections on nature, includingwild birds and an African safari. No nature lover will be disappointed in these pages.
Standish takes off full speed from there, guiding us around the world as only a knowledgeable and friendly tour guide could. The exquisite color pictures and stories behind the pictures are as captivating as their countries of origin. The graphics alone make this book worth its weight in gold. But the bonus is in the words which transported me effortlessly into an exciting realm of which I had been totally unaware. My 20 dollars spent on this book bought me a larger, brighter, more interesting world. A bargain any way you look at it.
Cathie Katz, Melbourne Beach, Florida
Kajishakar Kajishakar
I was disappointed by this book. I am genuinely interested in the subject of currency design and was anxiously awaiting the appearance of this book. I was hoping to find detailed descriptions of currency design including the vocabulary of engraving and ornamentation. Instead, the author stuck to flippant opinions regarding portraits or images. A lot of useless words wasted on irrelevant historical anecdotes. And a poorly considered and highly biased dismissal of the appearance of American currency. It is, in fact, in this last respect that the book, from the outset, is most disappointing and perplexing. Because, after all, it's only money we're talking about here and it will always and under all circumstances be highly limited in its artistic merits. Does the image of the American dollar have no power at all? The implication is that if you saw a dollar bill on the ground, you would be reluctant to pick it up solely on the grounds that the pictures on it aren't pretty enough. If, rather, the image of the dollar can impart to the otherwise insignificant piece of paper it is printed on the ability to alter human actions, you've got to wonder how it does it. In sum, this is a very pretty coffee-table book.