cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Cezanne (Big)
eBook Cezanne (Big) ePub

eBook Cezanne (Big) ePub

by Hajo Duchting,H Duchting

  • ISBN: 3822802751
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Hajo Duchting,H Duchting
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Taschen (June 26, 2000)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1403 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1502 kb
  • Other: rtf txt lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 552

Description

Hajo Duchting, H Duchting. Welcome to Our AbeBooks Store for books.

Hajo Duchting, H Duchting. ISBN 10: 3822802751, ISBN 13: 9783822802755. I always strive to achieve best customer satisfaction and have always described book accurately.

Hajo Duchting was born in Dusseldorf and trained as a translator. Then he studied art history, archaeology and philosophy. This book is beautifully photograped with large full page color works. He has worked in museums and has lectured on art history and museum education at the universities of Munich and Leipzig. Toward the end of his work you can really see why he has been called. The Father of Cubism'.

by Hajo Duchting (Author). Hajo Düchting (b. 1949 in Düsseldorf) studied art history, philosophy and archaeology in Munich, where he gained his doctorate in 1981 with a thesis on Robert Delaunay’s Windows series. After working in museum and adult education, he moved on to teaching posts and guest professorships at the universities of Munich, Kassel, Leipzig, Saarbrücken and Mainz.

Paul Cezanne: 1839-1906 : Nature into Art (Big Series : Art). WASSILY KANDINSKY (1866-1944) A Revolução da Pintura -(EURO . 9).

Cezanne (Big) By Hajo Duchting, H Duchting. Cezanne (Mega Squares),Grange Books. Cezanne (Big Art),Hajo Duchting.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station47. cebu on December 23, 2019.

Beautifully illustrated. Arts, Music & Photography Books Individual Artist Books. ISBN13: 9783822829288.

Book by Duchting, Hajo

Comments

DrayLOVE DrayLOVE
A decent overview of Cezanne's life and theories on painting and composition, complete with a generous sampling of his work. The pictures seem to be of very good quality.

Duchting's analysis can be a tad repetitive; in more than one place he makes the same exact point about color or structure or the deeper meaning behind a series of paintings twice in a row. He also likes to use the same descriptors for the work; for example, he describes just about every structural aspect of a Cezanne canvas as being "crystalline" in nature. A few pictures that Duchting describes as very important in Cezanne's development are, unfortunately, absent from this volume, though they are described in detail. Thankfully all of the missing pieces can be viewed online, so this does not take away from the experience.

All in all, a very good art book that falls just short of being worthy of five stars.
Rainbearer Rainbearer
I like this book a lot. To me it's the right proportion of information about the authors life and his paintings, well mixed in a timely manner.
Mbon Mbon
The book is nearly new to me, and there is some sign of using and storing on the cover, but it looks like new inside. Great paintings and articles with no doubt.
Gashakar Gashakar
When an arts historian decides to focus on plumbing the depths of his subject's psyche (a la Maynard Solomon) we are all in deep trouble. Not only is it really a fool's task but it is more the bully pulpit for the writer's personal theories than the subject him (her)self. Couple that with the unusually poor Taschen reproductions (dull, washed out color) and we have a less than desirable art book from a normally outstanding publisher. For a much better work (text and FAR better reproductions) try “Cezanne” by Henri Lallemand – same format and available at a similar price.
Marilbine Marilbine
This heart felt statement belongs to Henri Matisse.

If a painter wishes to see the beauty that enraptures him, he counts with the power to create it. If he wishes to see the grotesque, the laughable, or the pathetic, he will be about those issues schoolmistress and master. All what it exists in the universe, in essence or in imagination, is before all matter of his mind and then of his hand.

The skillfulness of this genius was merciless. He painted as a mathematician trying to demonstrate a theorem. He created and reduced to the purest essence and very often he neglected the complexity in search of the singleness. But we know what it meant this term: the sum of the sheerness, the overlapping of colors to give the shape and rhythm of the forms.

His revolutionary conception of the picture , the space and the form, he installed the basement for the new generations of the future painters, specially for the cubists, so with all the appropriate right he can be considered as the Modernism's father. Cezanne's ideal was to express the monumental in a modern language of clear tones and vibrating.

There' s a beauty anecdote told by Tarkovsky in which Cezanne who was beloved by the great public , was however deeply worried and even sad because his neighbor didn't understand at all the meaning of his work. That detail talks by itself of the he human quality of this notable artist.

Hajo Duchting describes the different stages of Cezanne work, focused according thematic and stylistic issues. Consider this book as the most complete, ambitious and prodigal in illustrations.
Blackbrand Blackbrand
When an arts historian decides to focus on plumbing the depths of his subject's psyche (a la Maynard Solomon) we are all in deep trouble. Not only is it really a fool's task but it is more the bully pulpit for the writer's personal theories than the subject him (her)self. Couple that with the unusually poor Taschen reproductions (dull, washed out color) and we have a less than desirable art book from a normally outstanding publisher. For a much better work (text and FAR better reproductions) try “Cezanne” by Henri Lallemand – same format and available at a similar price.
you secret you secret
When an arts historian decides to focus on plumbing the depths of his subject's psyche (a la Maynard Solomon) we are all in deep trouble. Not only is it really a fool's task but it is more the bully pulpit for the writer's personal theories than the subject him (her)self. Couple that with the unusually poor Taschen reproductions (dull, washed out color) and we have a less than desirable art book from a normally outstanding publisher. For a much better work (text and FAR better reproductions) try “Cezanne” by Henri Lallemand – same format and available at a similar price.