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eBook Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875 (Samuel and Althea Stroum Books) ePub

eBook Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875 (Samuel and Althea Stroum Books) ePub

by Russell Alan Potter

  • ISBN: 0295986808
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Russell Alan Potter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press; First American Edition edition (October 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1499 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1868 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf azw txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 330

Description

Download Citation On Nov 1, 2011, Jeffrey Mifflin and others published Arctic spectacles: The frozen north in visual . The Arctic grail: The quest for the North West Passage and the North Pole, 1818–1909. Atlas of exploration.

The Arctic grail: The quest for the North West Passage and the North Pole, 1818–1909.

Astrid E. J. Ogilvie. Published: 1 May 2009. Keywords: Frozen North, Arctic Spectacles, ISBN, North in Visual, visual culture, Stroum Book.

Series Statement: A Samuel & Althea Stroum book. General Note: "A Samuel & Althea Stroum book. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-254) and index. Geographic Name: Arctic regions Description and travel. Geographic Name: Arctic regions Pictorial works. Download Arctic spectacles : the frozen North in visual culture, 1818-1875 Russell A. Potter. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Astronomy Ancient.

His books include Spectacular Vernaculars: Hip-Hop and the Politics of Postmodernism (1995) and Arctic . Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875, University of Washington Press 2007.

His books include Spectacular Vernaculars: Hip-Hop and the Politics of Postmodernism (1995) and Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875 (2007), as well as a novel, Pyg: The Memoirs of a Learned Pig (2011). He also worked as a consultant on, and appears in, the Nova documentary Arctic Passage (2006). Pyg: The Memoirs of a Learned Pig, Canongate Books 2011.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875 Hardcover.

When every land seems already explored, and space travel has declined in scope and prestige, the northern exploits of our Victorian forebears offers a pleasantly distant mirror from which to regard our own time. The Arctic regions have been the subject of a long-lasting visual fascination, one which has from the outset crossed boundaries between fine art and mass entertainment, "high" and "low" cultures, and even national identity.

Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North in Visual Culture, 1818-1875 by Russell A. Potter; pp. 25. Potter makes two main claims: first, that geographical nationalism underwrote the resurgence of British political and cultural fascination with the Arctic region in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars; and, second, that this resurgence coincided with and depended upon a host of emergent visual technologies. These large claims have been asserted before. In outlining how panoramic spectacle moved Victorian culture, Potter provides a map of the many ways in which Arctic images travelled from the explorer ship to the London panorama stage and then back out again.

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When every land seems already explored, and space travel has declined in scope and prestige, the northern exploits of our Victorian forebears offers a pleasantly distant mirror from which to regard our own time. The Arctic regions have been the subject of a long-lasting visual fascination, one which has from the outset crossed boundaries between fine art and mass entertainment, "high" and "low" cultures, and even national identity. In the mid-nineteenth century, this polar passion reached a peak, dominating the visual culture of both Britain and America, and yet its history is scarcely known.

Arctic Spectacles: The Frozen North on Visual Culture, 1818-1875 illuminates the nineteenth-century fascination with visual representations of the Arctic, weaving together a narrative of the major Arctic expeditions with an account of their public reception through art and mass media. In a century that saw every corner of the globe slowly open to the examining eye of Western science, it was the Arctic - remote, mysterious, untamable - that most captured the imagination of artists and the public alike. Its impact could be seen in a range of visual media from fine art to panoramas, engravings, magic lantern slides, and photographs, as well as hybrid forms of entertainment in which Inuit were "exhibited" alongside a cabinet of assorted Arctic curiosities while Western gentlemen looked on.

In a lively and accessible style, Russell Potter traces the story of the long, drawn-out exploration of the Northwest Passage and the beginnings of the push toward the North Pole, each new expedition producing its own artistic response. While early visual representations focused on the natural wonders of a world of magical beauty and purity, later responses would darken, as the public struggled to come to terms with the human toll of Arctic exploration: lives lost, reports of cannibalism, and a sense of purpose gone asunder. Drawing from letters, diaries, cartoons, and sketches, as well as oft-overlooked ephemera such as newspaper advertisements, playbills, and program booklets, Potter shows how representations of the Arctic in visual culture expressed the fascination, dread, and wonder that the region inspired, and continues to inspire today.