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eBook Charles Sheeler in Doylestown: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition ePub

eBook Charles Sheeler in Doylestown: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition ePub

by Charles Sheeler,Karen Lucic

  • ISBN: 0295976438
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Charles Sheeler,Karen Lucic
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Allentown Art Museum; 1st edition (June 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 120
  • ePub book: 1842 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1366 kb
  • Other: doc mbr lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 332

Description

CHARLES SHEELER IN DOYLESTOWN is recommended to those interested in modernism in twentieth-century American art and, of course, to those interested in Charles Sheeler in particular.

CHARLES SHEELER IN DOYLESTOWN is recommended to those interested in modernism in twentieth-century American art and, of course, to those interested in Charles Sheeler in particular. By the way, an even better book on Sheeler is "Charles Sheeler: Across Media", by Charles Brock. 4 people found this helpful.

Charles Sheeler book . Start by marking Charles Sheeler: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Sheeler's first commercial assignments involved photographing recently completed buildings designed by Philadelphia architects. In New York, he also photographed works of art owned by galleries and private collectors. In about 1917, he began his first extended effort at uncommissioned, "fine art" photography in Doylestown. A mood of elevated appreciation for the Worthington house - so evident in his letters - inspired Sheeler to produce a series of photographs depicting the dwelling.

Charles Sheeler in Doylestown investigates one artist's lifelong engagement with the rich, distinctive traditions of rural Bucks County . Charles Sheeler in Doyleston : American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition. by Charles Sheeler and Karen Lucic.

Charles Sheeler in Doylestown investigates one artist's lifelong engagement with the rich, distinctive traditions of rural Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Charles Rettrew Sheeler Jr. was born in Philadelphia in 1883. At the Academy, he studied with William Merritt Chase, a prominent American Impressionist (6. 87. He visited Europe with his fellow students in 1904–5, and traveled abroad again in 1908–9 with his parents and his friend Morton Schamberg, another young artist.

The American modernist Charles Sheeler (1883–1965) explored the relationships between photography, film, and more . In the Rouge commission and the related works in various media, Sheeler successfully navigated the boundaries between applied, commercial, and fine art.

The American modernist Charles Sheeler (1883–1965) explored the relationships between photography, film, and more traditional media such as painting and drawing with more rigor and intellectual discipline than perhaps any other artist of his generation. As in a well-conceived scientific experiment, Sheeler used his own photographs and film stills as the basis for paintings and drawings, thus crystallizing the differences and similarities between them.

Charles Sheeler (July 16, 1883 – May 7, 1965) was an American painter and commercial photographer. He is recognized as one of the founders of American modernism, developing a style of painting known as Precisionism and becoming one of the master photographers of the 20th century. Charles Rettew Sheeler Jr. was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Charles Sheeler - the beauty of the machine/factory Charles Sheeler in Doylestown : American modernism and the Pennsylvania tradition by Karen Lucic. Cultural Heritage Books.

Charles Sheeler - the beauty of the machine/factory. No trace of human presence, success of big businesses of America rested on cold and calculated view of the individual worker. He painted images of Ford factories. Charles Sheeler in Doylestown : American modernism and the Pennsylvania tradition by Karen Lucic.

Karen Lucic, Charles Sheeler in Doylestown: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition (Allentown .

Karen Lucic, Charles Sheeler in Doylestown: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition (Allentown Art Museum, 1997), 97–8, 110–11, ill. p. 110. Karen E. Haas, ‘Opening the Other Eye’: Charles Sheeler and the Uses of Photography, in The Photography of Charles Sheeler: American Modernist (Bulfinch Press, 2002), 133–34, ill. 133. Charles Brock, Charles Sheeler: Across Media, exh. cat. (National Gallery of Art in association with University of California Press, 2006), 108–117, ill. 121.

Charles Sheeler in Doylestown investigates one artist's lifelong engagement with the rich, distinctive traditions of rural Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It charts Sheeler's discovery of the region's architecture and artifacts beginning about 1910, when he and fellow artist Morton Livingston Schamberg rented an 18th-century farmhouse in Doylestown. It assesses the impact this seminal event had on Sheeler's early career, and how his cyclical return to Bucks County themes in later life reveals poignant attachments and emotional depths not usually ascribed to this 20th-century painter and photographer -- known primarily as an iconographer of the machine.

Comments

MisTereO MisTereO
Karen Lucic, guest curator for the Allentown Art Museum’s 1997 exhibition “Charles Sheeler in Doylestown: American Modernism and the Pennsylvania Tradition” has done a superb job in describing and analyzing how Charles Sheeler used uniquely American in historic architecture and functional implements and put it in service of modernist movement in Art following the 1913 Armory Show. One could say that Sheeler helped make modern art palatable, even comprehensible to Americans during and following World War I . Contrary to the popular notion that Sheeler was an uncritical admirer of industry and the new technology, Sheeler’s primary objective was to meet the challenges of modern art in ways that respect his emphasis on rigor of design and craftsmanship and that were consonant with his own American heritage and cultural standards.

In Kucic’s second chapter, The Doylestown House, we come to understand how the stone house he and Morton Schamberg shared during summers and weekends outside of Philadelphia provided him with direct, daily access to abstract elements he was able to find in nature. These elements –arrangement of stone, wood and shadow - Sheeler prized highly. They permitted him to start to bridge the gap between pure representation and pure abstraction. Somewhere near the middle of that bridge we find Sheeler’s best work. Doylestown is where it began, with the 1768 house and with Pennsylvainia Dutch barns in the surrounding countryside.

Sheeler moved to New York after Schamberg’s untimely death in 1918, and became famous as the premier Precisionist painter of the New York skyscrapers and of industrial shapes and scenes. This is when his Upper Deck and his response to Ford’s River Rouge automobile plant – American Landscape and American Classic were completed. But as the Depression set in and advertising work dried up, he returned to the Doylestown photographs to produce drawings made with a finely sharpened Conte' crayon. The time and effort he took to do these works are rewarded by a viewer’s appreciation of their craftsmanship Kucic’s (and the reader’s) appreciation the fulfillment he found in revisiting the material that was so fundamental in helping him resolve the challenges posed by mopdernism in a way that was right for him and accessible to Americans. Kucic’s last chapter ,“Doylestown Revisited” covers this period in greater detail and with greater empathy than I have found in any other book on this pivotal pioneer in 20th Century American Art history. I heartily recommend it, especially after one has read a more general overview of Sheeler’s entire ouvre and his place in the Precisionist movement.
Gom Gom
Charles Sheeler is one of my favorite American artists, and this book features the works of his that speak the most to me -- farmhouses and barns in Bucks County, Pennsylvania (not far from where I grew up). CHARLES SHEELER IN DOYLESTOWN was assembled and published in connection with an exhibition of Sheeler's paintings and photographs organized by the Allentown Art Museum in 1997. At the time, Sheeler was known primarily as an American modernist who had produced compelling images of the Machine Age -- New York skyscrapers, locomotive engines, power plants, and factory complexes. The Allentown exhibit, and this book, reminded people that Sheeler had also produced equally compelling modernist images of preindustrial America, as exemplified by structures in rural Bucks County.

The book is divided into three sections. The first centers on an eighteenth-century stone farmhouse near Doylestown. Known as the Worthington house, Sheeler rented it and used it as a studio and a residence or retreat off and on between 1917 and 1926. In 1917 Sheeler produced a series of striking black-and-white photographs (gelatin silver prints) of the interior of the farmhouse, of which the pictures of a spiral wood staircase, the broad-planked door to the stairwell, and an iron stove are the most noteworthy. On various occasions later in his career, Sheeler re-worked these farmhouse interiors in oil paintings or in conté crayon works.

The second section of the book deals with photographs, paintings, and drawings of large barns in Bucks County that Sheeler executed while he lived and worked in the Doylestown area. The barns usually were constructed of fieldstone and clapboard or board-and-batten siding, and typically they centered a complex of ells and other side buildings. The contrasting textures and juxtaposed shapes made these barn complexes natural subjects for cubist-inspired and other modernistic artwork.

The final section of the book covers some of the drawings and paintings from the 1930s and 1940s in which Sheeler returned to the Bucks County subjects.

There are fifty-six works from the 1997 exhibition reproduced in this book, which also served as a catalogue to the exhibition. The reproductions, which for the most part are printed one per page, are quite satisfactory. The book also contains a text for each of its three sections, written by Karen Lucic. It is better than the norm for such art catalogues, but I must say that sometimes Lucic tries too hard and as a result she reads far too much into some of the photographs.

CHARLES SHEELER IN DOYLESTOWN is recommended to those interested in modernism in twentieth-century American art and, of course, to those interested in Charles Sheeler in particular. By the way, an even better book on Sheeler is "Charles Sheeler: Across Media", by Charles Brock.