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eBook Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China ePub

eBook Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China ePub

by Patricia Ann Berger

  • ISBN: 0824825632
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Patricia Ann Berger
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ of Hawaii Pr (February 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 266
  • ePub book: 1298 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1619 kb
  • Other: rtf doc azw docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 568

Description

Empire of Emptiness questions this generalization by taking a fresh look at the huge outpouring of Buddhist painting

Empire of Emptiness questions this generalization by taking a fresh look at the huge outpouring of Buddhist painting. Patricia Berger, former curator of Chinese art at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, is associate professor in the Department of the History of Art, University of California, Berkeley.

Empire of Emptiness questions this generalization by taking a fresh look at the huge outpouring of Buddhist painting, sculpture, and decorative arts Qing court artists produced for distribution throughout the empire. It examines some of the Buddhist underpinnings of the Qing view of rulership and shows just how central images were in the carefully reasoned rhetoric the court directed toward its Buddhist allies in inner Asia.

Lately, however, some scholars, such as Patricia Berger, have offered evidence which renders this argument questionable.

This is a contribution to be applauded. Lately, however, some scholars, such as Patricia Berger, have offered evidence which renders this argument questionable. 1 At the same time, a new trend in Qing studies stresses the Inner Asian heritage of the Qing rulers.

Book DescriptionImperial Manchu support and patronage of Buddhism, particularly in Mongolia and Tibet, has often been dismissed as cynical political manipulation. Empire of Emptiness questions this generalization by taking a fresh look at the hugeoutpouring of Buddhist painting, sculpture, and decorative arts Qing court artists produced for distribution throughout the empire

See Marco Musillo, Reassessing Castiglione’s Mission: Translating Italian Training into Qing Commissions . 16. See Wu Hung, Beyond Stereotypes: The Twelve Beauties in Qing Court Art and the Dream of the Red Chamber, in Writing Women in Late Imperial China, ed.

See Marco Musillo, Reassessing Castiglione’s Mission: Translating Italian Training into Qing Commissions, in Xifangren yu Qingdai gongting, 437–60; and idem, Reconciling Two Careers: The Jesuit Memoir of Giu- seppe Castiglione, Lay Brother and Qing Imperial Painter, Eighteenth- Century Studies 42, no. 1 (Fall 2008): 45–59.

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Published by: University of Hawai'i Press. Book Description: "The first complete translation of one of Candrakirti's major works into precise and readable English is a masterful achievement that might well encourage further collaboration between Western and Tibetan scholars. This is a contribution to be applauded. -Journal of Religion. In 1753, Hongli, the Qianlong emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty, had himself painted into the role of Buddhism’s greatest layman, the Licchavi merchant Vimalakīrti (Plate 1). The artist, a court painter named Ding Guanpeng, took no chances with this important commission.

Imperial Manchu support and patronage of Buddhism, particularly in Mongolia and Tibet, has often been dismissed as cynical political manipulation. Empire of Emptiness questions this generalization by taking a fresh look at the huge outpouring of Buddhist painting, sculpture, and decorative arts Qing court artists produced for distribution throughout the empire. It examines some of the Buddhist underpinnings of the Qing view of rulership and shows just how central images were in the carefully reasoned rhetoric the court directed toward its Buddhist allies in inner Asia. The multilingual, culturally fluid Qing emperors put an extraordinary range of visual styles into practice--Chinese, Tibetan, Nepalese, and even the European Baroque brought to the court by Jesuit artists. Their pictorial, sculptural, and architectural projects escape easy analysis and raise questions about the difference between verbal and pictorial description, the ways in which overt and covert meaning could be embedded in images through juxtaposition and collage, and the collection and criticism of paintings and calligraphy that were intended as supports for practice and not initially as works of art.

"All scholars of the Qianlong era, of early modern Mongol studies, of Tibetan Buddhism, and of pre-modern China studies will find the book indispensable." --- Pamela Crossley, Dartmouth College

"More than any other art historical study to appear recently, this book expands our view of the visual culture of late imperial China by highlighting its ethnic complexity." --- Marsha Haufler, University of Kansas