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eBook CTRL [SPACE]: Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother ePub

eBook CTRL [SPACE]: Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother ePub

by Thomas Y. Levin,Ursula Frohne,Peter Weibel

  • ISBN: 0262621657
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Thomas Y. Levin,Ursula Frohne,Peter Weibel
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1st Edition edition (May 15, 2002)
  • Pages: 665
  • ePub book: 1935 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1750 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 162

Description

Although, it features almost no contemporary work from the field of surveillance studies (David Lyon, Gary Marx, Clive Norris et a. it is a combination of sourcebook and idiosyncratic lucky-dip of contemporary surveillance discourses.

A heavy guidance for surveillance art from perspectives of history, art analysis and how surveillance is showed and operated in these works.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Ctrl : Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother. A heavy guidance for surveillance art from perspectives of history, art analysis and how surveillance is showed and operated in these works.

The dramatic increase of surveillance in the twentieth-century has also been matched by an increase of voyeuristic entertainment, exemplified by the Orwellian titled television game show Big Brother. The entertainment value of voyeuristic surveillance has arguably rendered individuals mor. ccepting of regulatory surveillance in their personal lives.

Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, Peter Weibel. This book investigates the state of panoptic art at a time when issues of security and civil liberties are on many people's minds. Traditional imaging and tracking systems have given way to infinitely more powerful "dataveillance" technologies, as an evolving arsenal of surrogate eyes and ears in our society shifts its focus from military to domestic space.

210 East Pyne Building, Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey 08544 Contact Co-Author: Ursula Frohne. Co-Author: Peter Weibel. Last updated on 10/30/2017.

210 East Pyne Building, Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey 08544 Contact. Levin, Thomas Y. Co-Author: Ursula Frohne.

The unknown history of surveillance in relation to changing systems of representation and visual arts practice. Thomas Y. Levin is Associate Professor of German at Princeton University where he teaches media and cultural theory. His most recent book CTRL : Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother (MIT Press, 2002) is the catalogue of a major exhibition which he curated at the ZKM in Karlsruhe (Germany). Ursula Frohne is Professor of Art and Art History at International University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.

This book, along with the exhibition it accompanies, is a state-of-the-art survey of panopticism-in .

oceedings{Levin2002CTRL, title {CTRL : rhetorics of surveillance from bentham to big brother}, author {Thomas Y. Levin and Ursula Frohne and Peter Weibel}, year {2002} }. This text investigates the state of panoptic art at a time when issues of security and civil liberties are on many people's minds.

Location: In: Thomas Y. Levin, et. al. Ed. CTRL : Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother (Cambridge, Mass. MIT Press, 2002): 578-593. Location: In Marie Nerland, E. Twenty-Five: An Anthology for the 25th Anniversary of BIT Teatergarasjen (Bergen, Norway: BIT Teatergarasjen, 2010): 189-193.

The ambition of CTRL is to trace the history and politics of surveillance from Bentham to the . Observations regarding the film The Truman Show and the television program Big Brother are equally pervasive.

The ambition of CTRL is to trace the history and politics of surveillance from Bentham to the present day, but also to show artistic responses to, and complications of, these conditions. Divided into eight chapters, the catalogue reproduces approximately thirty essays and seventy art projects. The genealogical goal is met excellently, but the criteria employed for selecting artworks appear to have been quite literal, making the selection of artists’ projects somewhat less satisfactory.

Publicity and Indifference: Media, Surveillance, ‘Humanitarian Intervention’. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

This book investigates the state of panoptic art at a time when issues of security and civil liberties are on many people's minds. Traditional imaging and tracking systems have given way to infinitely more powerful "dataveillance" technologies, as an evolving arsenal of surrogate eyes and ears in our society shifts its focus from military to domestic space. Taking as its point of departure an architectural drawing by Jeremy Bentham that became the model for an entire social regime, CTRL [SPACE] looks at the shifting relationships between design and power, imaging and oppression, from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries. From the photographs taken with hidden cameras by Walker Evans and Paul Strand in the early twentieth century to the appropriation of military satellite technology by Marko Peljhan a hundred years later, the works of a wide range of artists have explored the dynamics of watching and being watched. The artists whose panoptical preoccupations are featured include, among others, Sophie Calle, Diller + Scofidio, Dan Graham, Pierre Huyghe, Michael Klier, Rem Koolhaas, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Thomas Ruff, Julia Scher, Andy Warhol, and Peter Weibel. This book, along with the exhibition it accompanies, is the first state-of-the-art survey of panopticism—in digital culture, architecture, television, video, cinema, painting, photography, conceptual art, installation work, robotics, and satellite imaging.

Comments

Livina Livina
They're everywhere: tiny cameras, webcams, security cameras... video-capturing devices are almost as ubiquitous as the banner ads for them: "Watch anyone, anytime." We're all stuck somewhere between reality TV and a TV reality. Following the panopticon from an eighteenth century architectural drawing by Jeremy Bentham to the pervasive surveillance of the twenty-first century, CTRL [SPACE] is a comprehensive history of watching and being watched.
This massive tome includes writings by such luminaries as Steve Mann ("Reflectionism" and "Diffusionism": New Tactics for Deconstructing the Video Surveillance Superhighway), McKenzie Wark (To the Vector the Spoils), Lev Manovich (Modern Surveillance Machines: Perspective, Radar, 3-D Computer Graphics, and Computer Vision) and Timothy Druckrey (Secret Agents, Security Leaks Immune Systems, Spore Wars...), as well as philosophers like Michel Foucault (The Eye of Power: A Conversation with Jean-Pierre Barou and Michelle Perrot), Paul Virilio (The Visual Crash), Jean Baudrillard (Telemorphosis) and Gilles Deleuze (Postscript on Control Societies). CTRL [SPACE] also includes full-color photographs of the work of many artists preoccupied by the spread of the panopticon: Sophie Calle, Diller + Scofidio, Dan Graham, Pierre Huyghe, Michael Klier, Rem Koolhaas, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Thomas Ruff, Julia Scher, Andy Warhol and Peter Weibel, among others.
CTRL [SPACE] represents the first state-of-the-art survey of panopticism--in digital culture, architecture, television, video, cinema, painting, photography, conceptual art, installation work, robotics and satellite imaging. It is truly a required text for those watching and those being watched.
Malak Malak
Have you ever wanted a book that not only informs and educates you about surveillance and social control, but also offers you visual examples and responses from a varied and unusual selection of academics, journalists, artists, film-makers and more? I may be unusual, but I know I have!
CTRL [SPACE] offers not only new artwork and new articles from important researchers and theorists like Lev Manovich and Peter Weibel, including a fascinating piece on the links between the eye of God and modern surveillance by Astrid Schmidt-Burkhardt, but also: reprints of classic pieces from the likes of Foucault, Virilio, Deleuze, extracts of work on the cold war and computing by Paul Edwards and top-class investigative journalism on the NSA's Echelon system by Duncan Campbell, descriptions of efforts to resist surveillance from groups like the Surveillance Camera Players and the Institute for Applied Autonomy, and reconsiderations of both artistic, architectural and philosophical contributions to surveillance theory from Bentham to Warhol and Yoko Ono.
Although, it features almost no contemporary work from the field of surveillance studies (David Lyon, Gary Marx, Clive Norris et al.) it is a combination of sourcebook and idiosyncratic lucky-dip of contemporary surveillance discourses. This book is MIT Press at its best: it is beautifully-produced and does full justice to the work of the artists and commentators featured in the exhibition upon which it is based. The only slightly irritating feature about its otherwise admirable design is the use of intertextual footnotes in light grey, which are sometimes hard to read.
Altogether - recommended and worth it even at this price.
Uaoteowi Uaoteowi
its got it all. this book has a wide collection of wonderful text on the history, use, politics, future, and concepts of surveilence. its like a text book, but its not. the only complaint i have is the foot notes are in the middle of the pages in a ligher font and it makes it kind of hard to read the actual text on the page. and they have these red lines all over the place in the background of the text. good book, bad layout.