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eBook James Bama: American Realist ePub

eBook James Bama: American Realist ePub

by James Bama,Brian M. Kane

  • ISBN: 0972375880
  • Category: Individual Artists
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: James Bama,Brian M. Kane
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Flesk Publications; Second Printing edition (October 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1457 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1907 kb
  • Other: azw docx lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 788

Description

James Bama: American Realist is therefore a timely, and handsomely produced, overview of Bama's art. Over the course of 7 sections, it covers his work in commercial art in the 60s and early 70s, and his subsequent career in studio art since that time

James Bama: American Realist is therefore a timely, and handsomely produced, overview of Bama's art. Over the course of 7 sections, it covers his work in commercial art in the 60s and early 70s, and his subsequent career in studio art since that time. I'm sure many Baby Boomers will be nostalgic at seeing the illustrations Bama did for pop culture artifacts from their childhood reproduced here.

James Elliott Bama (born April 28, 1926) is an American artist known for his realistic paintings and etchings of Western subjects

James Elliott Bama (born April 28, 1926) is an American artist known for his realistic paintings and etchings of Western subjects. And you can stand surrounded by nature's wonders.

James Bama: American Realist is the first book to span his entire career. Written and designed by Brian M. Kane in cooperation with Mr. Bama. Introduction by Harlan Ellison®

James Bama: American Realist is the first book to span his entire career. Examples explore his diverse brush from magazine illustrations, paperback book covers, and advertising. James Bama: American Realist is the first book to span his entire career. Introduction by Harlan Ellison®. Foreword by Len Leone.

Explores Bama's diverse brushwork from magazine illustrations, paperback book covers, and advertising. Brian M. Kane is the author of Hal Foster: Prince of Illustrators and James Bama: American Realist. He teaches in the Illustration Department at the Columbus College of Art & Design, Columbus, Ohio. He has a Masters Degree in History of Art from The Ohio State University where he is currently working on his P. in Art Education with an emphasis in Visual Culture.

James Bama: American Realist by Bama, JamesKane, Brian M.

Shipping to Russian Federation. Customs services and international tracking provided. James Bama American Realist Signed Limited Deluxe Slipcase HC - Factory Sealed.

James Bama, Brian M. Kane. James Bama: American Realist is the first book to span his entire career

James Bama, Brian M. Chapters examine his work in pop culture, horror, science fiction, adventure and western genres, concluding with his most recent fine art endeavors. This volume features a detailed biography exploring his noteworthy and singular career.

James Bama: American Realist by Brian M. Kane with Harlan Ellison and Len Leone published by Flesk A Rare book at The Book Palace

James Bama: American Realist by Brian M. Kane with Harlan Ellison and Len Leone published by Flesk A Rare book at The Book Palace. In addition there is a DVD of a 56 minute film about Bama by Paul Jilbert in an illustrated folder.

James Bama: American Realist. James Bama, Brian M.

James Bama American Realist (2006). 1h 20min 5 October 2006 (USA).

James Bama is one of the few artists alive today who is legendary for several different types of artwork. Here’s another coincidence for you. I recently reread the AMERICAN REALIST book and it reminded me that Harlan Ellison had written the introduction

James Bama is one of the few artists alive today who is legendary for several different types of artwork. After moving to Wyoming from his home state of New York in 1968, Bama became one of America’s most famous and successful painters of Western art. His Western paintings are featured in museums and fine art galleries throughout the country and sell for tens of thousands of dollars. I recently reread the AMERICAN REALIST book and it reminded me that Harlan Ellison had written the introduction. Back in the day, Harlan wrote a few stories for men’s adventure magazines and he gave me permission to reprint a couple of them them.

The illustration art of James Bama has now been collected into this impressive 160-page full color hardbound edition. James Bama: American Realist is the first book to span his entire career. Examples explore his diverse brush from magazine illustrations, paperback book covers, and advertising. Chapters examine his work in pop culture, horror, science fiction, adventure and western genres, concluding with his most recent fine art endeavors.This volume features a detailed biography exploring his noteworthy and singular career. Insightful quotes by Bama accompany many pieces. In addition, testimonials by leading artists, writers, and historians are contained throughout.During his career, Bama’s art graced many memorable pop culture paperback book covers. Among his most notable works are the 62 cover paintings for Bantam’s Doc Savage adventure series, all of which are contained within.His uncanny ability to render a multitude of genres, and under amazingly tight deadlines, made Bama highly sought after by top publishers. Combined with his exemplary work ethic, Bama’s artwork encompassed a wide spectrum of media. This, along with his unique realist approach, helped secure his place as one of the most influential artists of his time. Having achieved remarkable success in illustration, Bama changed direction, pursuing a career in fine art. His gamble led to higher acclaim. This book delves into the man, from illustrator to artist.Written and designed by Brian M. Kane in cooperation with Mr. Bama. Introduction by Harlan Ellison®. Foreword by Len Leone. 160 pages in color. Over 260 illustrations are featured, of which more than 85 are from the original art. Over 30 personal photographs of family and modeling shoots are contained within.

Comments

GAZANIK GAZANIK
Anyone who glanced at a rack of paperback books in the mid 60's to early 70's was bound to see at least one or two covers painted by the gifted artist James Bama. The most memorable of these covers were those for the "Doc Savage" series published by Bantam Books. These illustrations were always striking and dramatic and served to make the book stand out from the other titles next to them. When I saw a second-hand copy of "The Living Fire Menace" at a thrift store in 1973, it was the dramatic cover painting of Doc, in all his ripped-shirt glory against a background of orange flames and some kind of electric-blue sphere, that made me shell out my hard-earned 50 cents. From that day on I was hooked, and collecting the adventures of Doc became one of my hobbies. It became second nature to scan the shelves for those distinctive Bama covers, and when he stopped painting them in the mid-70's the series lost some of its appeal.

At the time, it was hard to learn much about James Bama, much less the significant role he played in making these repackaged 30's pulp stories bestsellers for a contemporary audience. Indeed, any artist who worked for the paperback market in those days had to confront the reality that the publishing world considered them hired guns at best, and getting a credit line of tiny-font text on the back of the title page was about all the acknowledgement they could expect to receive.

James Bama: American Realist is therefore a timely, and handsomely produced, overview of Bama's art. Over the course of 7 sections, it covers his work in commercial art in the 60s and early 70s, and his subsequent career in studio art since that time. I'm sure many Baby Boomers will be nostalgic at seeing the illustrations Bama did for pop culture artifacts from their childhood reproduced here. Such as the boxes for the Aurora plastic model kits for the Universal monsters (Frankenstein, the Mummy, etc.), and the covers for bestsellers, such as "The Harrad Experiment" and the first of the "Star Trek" paperbacks by James Blish, as well as a seemingly unending series of potboilers churned out by William Goldman and Howard Fast. All 62 of the covers Bama did for the Doc Savage books are presented here as well, six to a page, with some getting full-page treatment.

The reproductions are of good quality and the layout pleasing to the eye, with the text placed to minimize encroaching on the illustrations. The introductory chapters offer an interesting account of the commercial art scene back in the era when magazines were starting to lose ground to the burgeoning paperback book as the principal format for print media. Once paperbacks became the dominant media and on-shelf competition tightened, having the right cover became increasingly important in boosting sales. Indeed, during his busiest period, Bama was producing a paperback cover painting a week, but he and his fellow freelance artists were stuck in a 'work for hire' system that rarely provided any royalties or other compensation for illustrating top-selling books. This fact of life as a commercial artist, and burn-out, may have been what led Bama to go into semi-retirement in Wyoming in the early 70's. Since then he has focused on Western art, and his paintings of cowboys and Indians are featured in the book's last section.

If the book has a weakness, it is the lack of any exposition on Bama's technique. Whether the author felt it would be out place in this particular book format, or if the artist himself was reluctant to reveal too many of his 'secrets', is unclear. Unfortunately, this means that those hoping to learn how to paint Bama-style, will have to look elsewhere.
Kale Kale
There was Frazetta, and there was Bama. James friggin' Bama, who back in the 1960s did for Doc Savage what Frank Frazetta did for Conan, which is make them relevant again and popular again. Being a sci-fi/fantasy/pulp enthusiast, I was blown away by James Bama's covers of Lester Dent's Doc Savage novels. But, of course, Bama did so much more than paint Doc Savage. Even Frazetta is an admirer of Bama's work (but of course it wouldn't be a surprise if Bama reciprocated this sense of admiration).

To quote Bama in an unpublished statement he penned in 1979: "I should like to think that what I am doing is somewhat unique and not very derivative and dread being categorized or grouped other than in very broad terms such as 'twentieth century realist.'" Bama's uniqueness is easily enough demonstrated by the immediacy with which his covers pop out on bookstore shelves. Even when one factors in all the copycats, his stuff still jumped out and grabbed you. I remember, because glimpsing one of his Doc Savage covers back in the '80s is how I started collecting Dent's Man of Bronze adventures. His stuff simply stands out from the rest, unique. Another Bama cover (it was either THE SKY-LINERS or THE BROKEN GUN) also led me to Louis L'Amour, who would quickly become my preferred author of western novels.

Bama's professional illustrating career started out in advertising, in which area he thrived because of his stunning realistic style and his ability to always meet deadlines. Later in life, he switched up and entered the field of fine arts, again unsurprisingly running into success and acclaim. The breadth of Bama's range is staggering. As a commercial illustrator, he painted soldiers at war, professional athletes, famous persons and classic movie monsters. He painted rebellious teens and sultry vixens, beggars and old women, and rendered them all so lifelike that you gaze for minutes and minutes at the attention to detail and the texture and that omnipresent yet undefinable inner glow. Some of his paintings leave me dumbfounded and wondering just how in hoolies he does what he does. Even writing luminaries such as Ray Bradbury and Pearl S. Buck have praised James Bama for his covers to their stories. Bama need never fear that his art will be thought of as "derivative."

Frazetta is a god, and he produced masterpieces etched in exagerrated, pulse-pounding swagger and bold colors. But with James Bama, the margin between reality and art blurs like a mother. Bama injects testosterone in his works by making his paintings so photorealistic that they're rendered very real and possible, no matter how outrageous the content, how implausible the stage. The convincing beads of sweat, that light playing just so on a glistening ripping muscle, the deep wrinkles and folds on his subjects' wardrobe, the natural (okay, okay, maybe just a wee bit contrived) poses... All this smacks of "real." If you want to get bedazzled, simply take a peep at the exceptional "Chester Medicine Crow" (page 149), which at first glance you'd mistake for a black and white photo, until you notice the caption indicating that Bama produced this bit of awesome via technical pen and ink! And when Bama draws the likeness of a celebrity, he doesn't leave you wondering "Hey, that kinda looks like Paul Newman." You know instinctively, like the sun in the sky, that the figure in the painting IS Paul Newman, even if drawn in profile (this was a promo for COOL HAND LUKE). Not even the god Frazetta, as much as I bow down to him, can achieve such uncanny likeness.

As this book states, James Bama's work was a barometer of the times, an artistic visual interpretation of pop culture in the '60s and '70s. Some of his seminal stuff in this era include his box cover artwork for a series of film monster model kits, which contributed to the "Monster Craze" in the '60s. His Frankenstein painting started it off. His painting for the cover of Hal Ellson's TOMBOY drew imitators out of the woodwork, as paintbrushing apers soon began regurgitating covers of rebel teens caught in like insouciant poses (but mostly of hip kids leaning against buildings). Bama's cover for William Goldman's THE TEMPLE OF GOLD was groundbreaking in the sense that he lent credibility to covers with empty white backgrounds, this originally thought not to be a selling aesthetic.

But, for fanboys (fanfogies?) like me, the bread and the butter were in those monochromatic Doc Savage covers, which I think more than anything embody Bama's marrying of exquisite technical craftsmanship and larger than life flavoring. And, terrific book that this is, all 62 Doc Savage covers are herein reproduced. To top it off, my favorite Doc Savage painting (THE PHANTOM CITY) makes it as the cover to JAMES BAMA: AMERICAN REALIST. Yes, I actually own all the Doc Savage novels with the James Bama covers. Which is why the Steve Holland segments come as such a welcome treat. Actor and model Steve Holland posed for many of Bama's works, and specifically for the Doc Savage stuff. The book does provide samples of Bama's photoshoots of his models, sometimes juxtapositioned with the resultant paintings, for the purpose of comparing and contrasting. Several of these photos showcase his lovely wife and former model, Lynne, whom he met on the job. One of the final pages features a wonderful reflective painting of Lynne by her hubbie.

It's a bit weird that one book can encapsulate a lifetime's work. But JAMES BAMA: AMERICAN REALIST, coming with an intro by writer Harlan Ellison, does much to fill us in on James Bama's life, personal and professional. It unveils the tapestry of his works down the years, from his time as a commercial illustrator to his foray into fine arts. As another reviewer has mentioned, what's starkly missing is Bama's thoughts and tips on and breakdowns of technical details regarding his artwork. Maybe it's better this way. If the master did unveil his techniques, odds are we his students would've taken them up and ended up failing miserably. My ego, precarious as a suicide jumper's, won't survive that.

In the ranks of remarkable twentieth century realists, James Bama joins the likes of Andrew Wyeth and Norman Rockwell. All three deserve their place at the head of the table. But there's a special beat in my heart for James Bama. When I was a kid, his fabulous art sparked my imagination and helped to widen my world, introduced me to more branches of literary fiction. I'm so glad this book is out. Be a damn shame and a deep loss should we ever let James Bama and his art slip away from us.
JOGETIME JOGETIME
I recently recieved my copy of James Bama: American Realist and let me say I'm just floored by this incredible collection by a true master painter. Bama's speciality was book covers, mostly of the mass market paperback variety where his incredible visions of adventure were needed to catch the eye of readers. His technique is flawless, with a realism that elevates his subjects into powerful visions. His mastery of texture and form is particularly impressive.
I knew him only for his iconic portrayal of pulp legend Doc Savage, but there is a whole lot more in this book, covers for westerns, war stories, science fiction and even romance and teen novels.
The highlight for me, of course, was the Doc Savage section, with cover reproductions of every single Bantam Books Doc Savage novel with a James Bama painting. These covers almost cry out READ ME as they are filled with incredibly visions of adventure.
The book ends with a section of Bama's western themed paintings which is what he does nowdays, and these too are fantastic, evoking serene visions of cowboys, indians and wildlife, always with his characteristic realistic style.