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eBook Duende : A Journey in Search of Flamenco ePub

eBook Duende : A Journey in Search of Flamenco ePub

by Jason Webster

  • ISBN: 0552999970
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Jason Webster
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Transworld Pub; New Ed edition (December 31, 2003)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1283 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1654 kb
  • Other: mbr azw lit txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 871

Description

Duende: A Journey In Sear. has been added to your Basket. Jason writes very frankly about where his obsession with flamenco brought him the very rock and roll lifestyle of flamenco performers in the 1990s and the life of it's mostly gypsy performers.

Duende: A Journey In Sear.

Webster, Jason, 1970-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Brought up in England, Jason Webster has lived for many years in Spain

Brought up in England, Jason Webster has lived for many years in Spain. His Max Cámara series of crime novels started with Or the Bull Kills You, which was was longlisted for the CWA Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards New Blood Dagger 2011.

Webster starts his journey in Alicante, where he takes guitar lessons from the melancholy Juan and learns, among . Even so, I don't believe that everything in Duende is true. It doesn't matter - Jason Webster is an exceptional writer, and this is a great book

Webster starts his journey in Alicante, where he takes guitar lessons from the melancholy Juan and learns, among other things, to take care of his nails: "We filed, glued, varnished, refiled, sprayed, blew and generally pampered ourselves like a couple of tarts on pay da. At the same time Webster arranges to teach English at a college run by Vicente and his wife Lola, a sulky redhead, who, it transpires, is also a flamenco dancer. It doesn't matter - Jason Webster is an exceptional writer, and this is a great book. Miranda France is the author of Don Quixote's Delusions: Travels in Castilian Spain (Orion).

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Jason Webster was studying Arabic at Oxford, and . Forget Oxford, Florence and the Arab world. Flamenco Spain was the true object of his passion and he quickly set out to immerse himself in it, led on by its distinctive, mournful music.

Jason Webster was studying Arabic at Oxford, and looking forward to what promised to be a distinguished academic career, when his Florentine girlfriend fell out of love with him and he, in turn, fell out of love with Arabic. Looking up from the ruins of his expectations, he realised he had been blind. Flamenco Spain was the true object of his passion and he quickly set out to immerse himself in it, led on by its distinctive, mournful music

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Destined for a sedate and predictable life in academia, Jason Webster was derailed in his early twenties when his first love, an aloof Florentine beauty, dumped him unceremoniously. Продавец:blondiescloset (1402)98,9% положительных отзывовСвязаться с продавцом. Duende : A Journey into the Heart of Flamenco by Jason Webster (2003, Hardcover). 1 оценка товараОб этом товаре.

Every bookshelf should own Jason Webster. He's better than Hemingway, period

Every bookshelf should own Jason Webster. He's better than Hemingway, period.

Duende is Webster’s captivating memoir of the years he spent in Spain pursuing his obsession. Studying flamenco guitar until his fingers bleed, he becomes involved in a passionate yet doomed affair with Lola, a flamenco dancer (and older woman) married to the gun-toting Vicente, only to flee the coastal city of Alicante in fear for his life. He ends up in Madrid, miserable and lovelorn, but it’s here that he has his first taste of the gritty world of flamenco’s progenitors †the Gypsies whose edgy lives and fervent commitment to the art of flamenco vividly illustrate the path to duende.

Having pursued a conventional enough path through school and university, Jason Webster was all set to enter the world of academe as a profession. But when his aloof Florentine girlfriend of some years dumped him unceremoniously, he found himself at a crossroads. Abandoning the world of libraries and the future he had always imagined for himself, he headed off instead for Spain in search of duende, the intense emotional state - part ecstasy, part desperation - so intrinsic to flamenco. DUENDE is an account of his years spent in Spain feeding his obsessive interest in flamenco: he subjects himself to the tyranny of his guitar teacher, practising for hours on end until his fingers bleed; he becomes involved in a passionate affair with Lola, a flamenco dancer (and older woman) married to the gun-toting Vicente, only to flee Alicante in fear of his life; in Madrid, he falls in with Gypsies and meets the imperious Jes?s. Joining their dislocated, cocaine-fuelled world, stealing cars by night and sleeping away the days in tawdry rooms, he finds himself spiralling self-destructively downwards. It is only when he arrives in Granada bruised and battered, after two years total immersion in the flamenco lifestyle that he is able to put his obsession into context. In the tradition of Laurie Lee's classic AS I WALKED OUT ONE MIDSUMMER MORNING, DUENDE charts a young man's emotional coming of age and offers real insight into the passionate essence of flamenco.

Comments

Jaiarton Jaiarton
Interesting read about the soul of flamenco and how necessary it is to have duende to dance it successfully.
Lucam Lucam
This book was so good I moved to Spain. Amazing. You should read Sacred Sierra by the same author if you are considering a move to Spain or have an interest in Spain. Duende is a concept foreign to non-Spaniards, and it is explained brilliantly as well as a passion for flamenco conveyed perfectly. Every bookshelf should own Jason Webster. He's better than Hemingway, period.
Goltigor Goltigor
I think the problem that some of the thumbs-down reviewers had with this book was that they got sidetracked by the subtitle, "a journey into the heart of Flamenco." They apparently thought that it was going to be a didactic work. (The author is an Oxford graduate, so we must use words like "didactic"). Instead, it's a very personal story, a "tell all" about the author's experiences as a foreigner (i.e., non-Spaniard) trying to lead a flamenco life, and I don't find that it was represented as anything other than that. And insofar as that story goes, it was generally well written
What is clear is that Jason Webster came to Spain in search of flamenco without doing any prior research or study, not even having touched a guitar previously - rather odd for an Oxford grad, but maybe that was part of what he was running away from. That's what got him into all the strange and sometimes funny scenes he relates because seemingly every flamenco aficionado he ran into was a self-proclaimed "expert" who told him something different.
Poor Jason also came to the wrong places: Valencia and Alicante on the southeast coast of Spain, two venues that are well outside flamenco's incubators: southwest Andalucía (Cádiz, Jeréz and Sevilla province in particular), and Madrid, the capital where most of the best artists end up because it provides the best means of earning a living. That's just about analogous to someone coming to the United States in search of jazz and blues but starting out with a flat in Des Moines, Iowa, then moving on to Butte, Montana. He did get to Granada, which has a much smaller but increasingly thriving flamenco scene, but only after a good deal of trial and error - and then he went back to the southeast coast anyway. And that was after living in a poor suburb of Madrid without ever visiting the thriving dance studios where he could have met and learned to play with some really good artists instead of stealing cars and doing lines of coke.
Those missteps probably lead the author to the main title, "Duende." Many an experienced flamenco groans when they hear that word. Federico García Lorca started the craze for "duende" back in the twenties, and Donn Pohren enshrined it for all English-speaking aficionados through his work, "The Art of Flamenco", first published in the early sixties and which for many decades was the only book in English on the subject. "Duende" literally means an elf or gnome, and can include poltergeists as well. It did imply "soul" or "spirit" within some circles in flamenco, but overuse caused such word inflation that its original meaning was greatly devalued, and many flamencos came to avoid it. "Aire" was the principal word used instead of "duende" when I lived in Spain in the early seventies, and now one also hears "pellizco" which may or may not mean the same thing. "Duende" is today more often used by promoters in the tourist trade rather than artists. Of course, the use of that word in the title might well be due to the publisher rather than the author, but that would be consistent: "Duende" once again being used to sell something rather than describe it.
The one serious bone I might have to pick with the author, however, is his intimation that drugs are an integral, even necessary, part of being a flamenco. True, drugs became very pervasive in the post-Franco era, but they have never been anything close to "necessary." For over a hundred years flamenco did quite well fueled solely with nicely fermented grape juice, perhaps a bit of distilled spirit, but that was it. Weed, coke, hash are strictly optional and mostly detrimental. He seems to have swallowed the drugs-are-necessary idea hook, line and sinker, but the fact that the particular Gypsies he hung out with had to steal cars to make ends meet attests to their lack of success as professional flamenco artists. Drugs and thievery are dead ends, not roads to the heart of flamenco or anything else. Yes, Camaron de la Isla, one of flamenco's greats, used lots of drugs and smoked like a house on fire. He also died at the age of 42. (But if you do enough drugs you just might see a few duendes.)
The back jacket cover says that the author still lives in Valencia. If he harbors any hope of writing a sequel, he better start thinking about moving to where there's at least a flamenco road to follow.
Hulore Hulore
Interesting story about a young Englishman trying to fit into the world of flamenco. It seemed realistic and didn't idealize the lives of the musicians. It was easy to see why he got into drugs. The story kind of fizzled out at the end leaving the reader wondering what happened to the author. The elderly lady in Granada could have used more explanation. How did she know so many people and get around so much? I'd like to read a sequel.
Cordann Cordann
Fascinating personal story about a topic of great interest to me.
Kagrel Kagrel
I thought I would love this book but found it promotes stereotypes, of flamenco, gypsies, and a first love. A waste of time
Carrot Carrot
Useful as part of my research for my graduate thesis.
I LOVED this book and read it all in one day.