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eBook Straightedge Youth: Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture ePub

eBook Straightedge Youth: Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture ePub

by Robert Wood

  • ISBN: 0815631278
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Robert Wood
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Syracuse University Press; First Edition edition (October 19, 2006)
  • Pages: 180
  • ePub book: 1893 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1210 kb
  • Other: lit mobi lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 734

Description

Robert T. Wood presents the first theoretical and in-depth treatment of the straightedge culture.

Robert T. Drawing on interviews with founding members and current straightedge youth, content analysis of the music lyrics, and straightedge "zines," Wood places the movement within the context of contemporary subcultural theory and the framework of cultural studies. This book offers an excellent introduction for those interested in the sociology of punk rock and its subcultures and will be an invaluable resource for sociologists and straightedge adherents.

Download PDF book format. Youth United States Straight-edge culture Subculture Straight-edge (Music). Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Straightedge youth : complexity and contradictions of a subculture Robert T. Wood. Book's title: Straightedge youth : complexity and contradictions of a subculture Robert T. Library of Congress Control Number: 2006020322. Download now Straightedge youth : complexity and contradictions of a subculture Robert T. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

The book confines itself to exploring straight edge as a subculture and how that subculture's ideas shifted . Hopefully Wood will go on to address these more complex aspects of straight edge as he continues his academic career. 7 people found this helpful.

The book confines itself to exploring straight edge as a subculture and how that subculture's ideas shifted throughout history. It pays lip service to some more off-the-beaten path ideas about straight edge, such as feminist straight edge (by way of articulating the female perspective of straight edge) but it does so briefly and insufficiently.

Straightedge Youth book. Start by marking Straightedge Youth: Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Hardline grew out of straight edge. Wood, Robert T. (2006). Straight Edge Youth: The Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press. The original logo of the movement was an outline of a large "X" (a sign associated with straightedge) with two crossed M16 rifles inside it. Muttaqi has said that he was first exposed to the idea of fusing veganism and abstinence from drugs by an English punk named Rat. Rat had allegedly coined the term "vegan straight edge" by the mid-1980s.

The Straight Edge Subculture: Examining the Youths’ Drug Free Way. Journal of Drug Issues 29 (2): 365–380. Straightedge Youth: Complexity And Contradictions of a Subculture by Robert Woods.

Wood, Robert T. 2006. Straightedge: Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture. A book of interviews with many of the key musicians and other insiders who shaped the youth crew era of straight edge. Study of the many variations and changes in straight edge over time, based upon interview data and analysis of song lyrics. Burning Fight: The Nineties Hardcore Revolution in Ethics, Politics, Spirit, and Sound.

Straightedge Youth : Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture. Emerging out of the American punk rock scene of the early 1980s, straightedge youth have held their ground and made important inroads on the broader terrain of American youth culture for the last twenty-five years.

Straightedge Youth: Complexity and Contradictions of a Subculture . Syracuse University Press, 2006, 192pp. Wood's work draws on his doctoral dissertation on straightedge youth written at the University of Alberta. The theoretical frameworks are somewhat different, though they have both read many of the same books. What this means in practice is strikingly similar in each case. The books are based on some participant observation.

How stereotyping students became a thriving industry and a bundle of contradictions. Sandy Huffaker for The Chronicle. Does anyone really understand them? Only some people do, or so it seems. They are experts who have earned advanced degrees, dissected data, and published books. If the minds of college students are a maze, these specialists sell maps. Ask them to explain today's teenagers and twentysomethings.

Emerging out of the American punk rock scene of the early 1980s, straightedge youth have held their ground and made important inroads on the broader terrain of American youth culture for the last twenty-five years. Known primarily for their militant opposition to drinking, drug use, and casual sex, as well as for their commitment to vegetarian and vegan lifestyles, straightedge youth have received little scholarly attention, and then primarily through studies focused on the larger subcultural framework of punk rock. Robert T. Wood presents the first theoretical and in-depth treatment of the straightedge culture. Drawing on interviews with founding members and current straightedge youth, content analysis of the music lyrics, and straightedge "zines," Wood places the movement within the context of contemporary subcultural theory and the framework of cultural studies. Identifying straightedge as a movement whose cultural boundaries have transformed over time, Wood explores the ways in which the group members' diverse and often contradictory self-understanding has contributed to the movement's evolution. Wood details the complexities of the subculture from its origins in Washington, D.C., through the emergence of schismatic straightedge factions and the adoption of animal rights and vegetarian agendas. This book offers an excellent introduction for those interested in the sociology of punk rock and its subcultures and will be an invaluable resource for sociologists and straightedge adherents.

Comments

Wnex Wnex
So, I stayed up all night and read it. It reads like a collection of academic papers. A lot of the focus is on how the case study supports certain sociological theories that the author believes are valid is understanding subcultures, and that part is super dry. There's a bit of interesting history, and a ton of quoting of lyrics from, in particular, Youth of Today, Minor Threat, Earth Crisis, Raid, Integrity, and Shelter. The chapter on straightedge symbolism I found to be particularly shallow and lacking. And I think it would honestly be super interesting to read the raw transcripts of the source interviews with the 21 subjects from the case study. The book also cites the Revelation “All Ages: Reflections on Straight Edge” book, since it features a lot of interviews of prominent straighedgers from many of the most influential bands.

In all, an interesting read, though it lacked the depth I was hoping for in terms of history and detail. I might pick up the other books I linked above and do some more reading. The Revelation book was a lot more interesting from a historical perspective, though this book gives probably the most academically rigorous look at straightedge as a social subculture, which was the author's stated intent.

Like many academic papers/books, there's also a lot of repetition that I personally find annoying, so be forewarned. I am familiar with this style and understand it is part of the academic/research style, but I find it irritating because if feel like I'm reading the same point being made like 3 or 4 times and it bores me.
Bys Bys
Very good insite to the Straight Edge community. I found everything to be accurate and also learned a few things.
Jeb Jeb
This text isn't a readable straight edge primer for those who are unaware of the hardcore punk community or straight edge, nor is this a book intended for consumption by current residents of the hardcore community. This is a sociology text focusing on the study of straight edge and additionally including some commentary about subculture study and the study of youth subcultures in general, making the intended reader for this text narrow, and its readability compromised for anyone without prior interest in sociology.

The text is dry, but still very informative, and it does give a brief (though generally insufficient) rundown of each of the sociological ideas it utilizes to evaluate straight edge. The book confines itself to exploring straight edge as a subculture and how that subculture's ideas shifted throughout history. It pays lip service to some more off-the-beaten path ideas about straight edge, such as feminist straight edge (by way of articulating the female perspective of straight edge) but it does so briefly and insufficiently. Primarily what is discussed are conventional straight edge, hardline, and Hare Krishna, well worn topics for anyone familiar with straight edge, however examining each of these things from a sociological perspective is certainly interesting.

The biggest benefit to the text for those familiar with hardcore and straight edge is the reexamining of straight edge through a sociological lens (although almost all the time the insights aren't groundbreaking) and more significantly insight into the relationship between straight edge and The Process Church of Final Judgment. For many, myself included, The Process Church and its function within hardcore can be somewhat confusing, and this book expounds on it quite nicely.

This text is not perfect, and it omits huge portions of the straight edge experience, but not for lack of trying. The text doesn't present itself as a monolithic or complete text on straight edge, and it in facts cautions researchers about those types of ideas in the research of any subculture, making these omissions far more forgivable. The text won't redefine anyone's view of straight edge (unless its woefully misinformed), but the text is balanced and informative on the issues it does explore, and is a worthy read for any interested party, although maybe a slightly boring one for those not interested in the sociological concepts which serve as the book's foundation
Bandiri Bandiri
After wondering for ten years when academia was going to get around to examining straight edge, I was pleasantly surprised to see not one, but two books on the subculture published last year (the other is Ross Haenfler's "Straight Edge"). Wood's study is based on interviews, content analysis of lyrics, and semiotic analysis of symbols, and reads like a good dissertation. It's deeply rooted in subcultural theory, and the central thesis is that straight edge is a such a dynamic subculture that no one flavor of subcultural theory (such as interactionist, Birmingham, etc.) can explain it on its own, but rather that a whole array of tools and theories need to be applied to it.

This is all relatively clearly explained -- for an academic work -- but the examination of identity formation is unlikely to be that fascinating to a general reader who knows little or nothing about straight edge. Personally, I got into straight edge around 1987 and remain so, and the study told me little I wasn't already explicitly or implicitly aware of. The focus of the work is straight edge's constant revisioning, from its birth as an offshoot of punk, to the addition of vegetarian and animal rights, the emergence of "hardline", and even Satanic elements (This satanic linkage was one area that was totally new to me. The other part that gave me something new to think about was Woods' assertion that the Reagan-era "War on Drugs" provided latent cultural support for straight edge. He's very careful to distance himself from any cause and effect pronouncements, but it's a linkage that nonetheless strikes me as more coincidental than anything.)Along the way, the reader gets a concise history of the subculture, along with a selection of quotes from key figures. These are especially useful in the section describing the transition of many straight edge kids into Krishna Consciousness.

On the whole, this is nice volume in subcultural studies using straight edge as a case study, but unlikely to that useful to those seeking a detailed sense of the history or demographics of straight edge. There are lots of questions that aren't addressed: for example, why is straight edge primarily a white middle class male subculture. Why (and how) has it gained a strong presence is some countries (Germany, Japan, and Norway for example), but not others? What are the factors that lead to people "claiming" or "unclaiming" the subculture? How do extreme applications of the subculture, such as the Salt Lake City crew, come about? How do some bands become associated with straight edge even if they aren't? Hopefully Wood will go on to address these more complex aspects of straight edge as he continues his academic career.