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eBook The Early Mandolin: The Mandolino and the Neapolitan Mandoline (Early Music Series) ePub

eBook The Early Mandolin: The Mandolino and the Neapolitan Mandoline (Early Music Series) ePub

by Paul Sparks,James Tyler

  • ISBN: 0198163029
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Paul Sparks,James Tyler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press (April 9, 1992)
  • Pages: 200
  • ePub book: 1493 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1627 kb
  • Other: lrf lit txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 607

Description

James Tyler, Paul Sparks. This is the first book to be devoted exclusively to the two main types of early mandolin - the mandolino and the Neapolitan mandoline.

James Tyler, Paul Sparks. It illustrates the rich and varied musical history of these instruments and the full extent of their repertoires, which include music by Handel, Vivaldi, Alessandro Scarlatti, Beethoven, and by Sammartini, whose recently discovered sonata for mandolin is published here for the first time

He wrote about the 1989 book that James Tyler and Paul Sparks wrote together, The Early Mandolin: the Mandolino and the Neapolitan mandolin. He quoted Paul Sparks as saying the four-course Roman mandolone was "usually referred to as a liuto

He wrote about the 1989 book that James Tyler and Paul Sparks wrote together, The Early Mandolin: the Mandolino and the Neapolitan mandolin. He quoted Paul Sparks as saying the four-course Roman mandolone was "usually referred to as a liuto. This was important because the instrument did not seem to match the music written for it, and that it is unclear whether "mandolone" refers to a large mandoline or the Roman instrument created by Gaspar Ferrari Mandolon.

Neapolitan Mandoline. By James Tyler and Paul Sparks Donald Gill. The book accordingly is in two parts, The Mandolino by Tyler and The Mandoline by Sparks, each part following the same plan. Part of the Music Practice Commons. Gill, Donald (1991) ""The Early Mandolin: The Mandolino and the Neapolitan Mandoline. Origins are outlined, followed by a historical survey covering, in the case of the mandolino, the late sixteenth to the late eighteenth century, and from ca. 1740 to the early nineteenth century for the mandoline.

The name "mandolin" was used to refer to two quite different instruments: the gut-stringed mandolino, played with the fingers, and the later metal-stringed Neapolitan mandoline, which was played with a plectrum. This is the first book devoted exclusively to these two early instruments about which information in reference books is scant and often erroneous.

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The Classical Mandolin (Early Music Series). It illustrates the rich and varied musical history of these instruments and the full extent of their repertoires, which include music by Handel, Vivaldi, Alessandro Scarlatti, Beethoven, and by Sammartini, whose recently discovered sonata for mandolin is published here for the first time. The book aims to provide the basis for an understanding of the nature and historical performance practice of the instruments and thereby to enable players of today to achieve satisfying performances of the music. See all Product description.

The Early Mandolin: The Mandolino and the Neapolitan Mandoline. By James Tyler and Paul Sparks.

The name "mandolin" was used to refer to two quite different instruments: the gut-stringed mandolino, played with the fingers, and the later . Tyler is Professor of Music and Director of the Early Music Performance Program at the University of Southern California.

The name "mandolin" was used to refer to two quite different instruments: the gut-stringed mandolino, played with the fingers, and the later metal-stringed Neapolita mandoline, which was played with a plectrum. Paul Sparks is a Parish Organizer and Social Entrepreneur.

Paul Sparks, James Tyler. - Early Music, 'elegantly-produced volume. an essential resource for players and scholars of plucked instruments.

The name "mandolin" was used to refer to two quite different instruments: the gut-stringed mandolino, played with the fingers, and the later metal-stringed Neapolitan mandoline, which was played with a plectrum. This is the first book devoted exclusively to these two early instruments about which information in reference books is scant and often erroneous. The authors uncover their rich and varied musical history, examining contemporary playing techniques and revealing the full extent of the instruments' individual repertories, which include works by Vivaldi, Sammartini, Stamitz, and Beethoven. The book's ultimate aim is to help today's players to produce artistically satisfying performances through an understanding of the nature and historical playing style of these unjustly neglected instruments.

Comments

Nalme Nalme
This was recommended by an excellent classical mandolin player/instructor. It covers history of instrument development, prominent people who excelled in playing and made changes to the instrument. Composers who wrote for mando and technique development is also covered. It is a must-have for those studying the instrument - very readable and fascinating!
Reighbyra Reighbyra
Excellent book, a must for mandolin players
Ranicengi Ranicengi
A well written book. It is, in fact, a serious research work on the mandolin history. I really enjoyed reading it.