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eBook Danny Boy: The Legend Of The Beloved Irish Ballad ePub

eBook Danny Boy: The Legend Of The Beloved Irish Ballad ePub

by Malachy McCourt

  • ISBN: 0762411244
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Malachy McCourt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Running Press Adult; First Edition edition (December 27, 2001)
  • Pages: 144
  • ePub book: 1626 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1544 kb
  • Other: rtf azw mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 704

Description

Malachy Gerard McCourt (born 20 September 1931) is an Irish-American actor . Danny Boy: The Legend of the Beloved Irish Ballad. The book recounts the journey and the many obstacles that McCourt had to overcome

Malachy Gerard McCourt (born 20 September 1931) is an Irish-American actor, writer and politician. He was the 2006 Green Party candidate for governor in New York State, losing to the Democratic candidate Eliot Spitzer. He is the younger brother of author Frank McCourt. The book recounts the journey and the many obstacles that McCourt had to overcome. After first working as a longshoreman, he was able to open a successful Manhattan tavern frequented by entertainment celebrities, and appeared on television talk shows, although neglecting his wife and child.

In this delightful volume, Malachy McCourt takes readers on a surprising and emotional journey, centered around one of the most enduring songs . Danny Boy" is one of the best-known and most beloved songs in the Western world.

In this delightful volume, Malachy McCourt takes readers on a surprising and emotional journey, centered around one of the most enduring songs in history. Whether sung at funeral masses or by Elvis Presley, it nearly always raises a lump in the throat and brings a tear to the eye. The song itself may be simple and direct, but McCourt (A Monk Swimming) has written a lively and detailed cultural history of the tune's origins, cultural meanings and political import that is as fascinating as it is frequently provocative.

Danny Boy," love it or hate it, holds its position firmly as one of the most popular and recognizable Irish songs of all .

Danny Boy," love it or hate it, holds its position firmly as one of the most popular and recognizable Irish songs of all time. See the mystery behind it unraveled by Irish American author Malachy McCourt. McCourt distorts everything we previously believed of our beloved song revealing that "Danny Boy" is not even a completely original song but a version among the 100s of different lyrics set to the tune of the "Derry Ai.

McCourt, Malachy, 1931-. Londonderry air. Publisher. Philadelphia : Running Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. org on August 18, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Электронная книга "Danny Boy: The Legend Of The Beloved Irish Ballad", Malachy McCourt. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Danny Boy: The Legend Of The Beloved Irish Ballad" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In this delightful volume, Malachy McCourt takes readers on a surprising. When I ran across this book at a flea market several years ago, I had to take it home. I really enjoyed it and read it over several times. I loved the information about the song that McCourt supplied but also enjoyed the little tidbits of history he supplied. Several years later I included the book in a care package I sent to soldiers stationed in Kuwait.

Everyone can hum this haunting Irish ballad that inevitably brings a tear to the eye. The most requested Irish song, it has . The most requested Irish song, it has been recorded by a variety of performers ranging from Elvis Presley, Bing Crosby, and Kate Smith to the Pogues. He traces the evolution of the music, which is one of more than 100 songs composed to the very same tune, including the familiar "Londonderry Air," and explores the enduring mystique of "Danny Boy" in an unforgettable tribute that brilliantly weaves history with folklore. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Join free & follow Nick Schenkel's WBAA Book Revi. This is a lively and detailed history of the tune's origins. by Nick Schenkel's WBAA Book Revi. More from Nick Schenkel's WBAA Book Revi.

Author Malachy McCourt unravels the mystery of "Danny Boy," perhaps the most popular Irish song ever. Turns out, the famed lyrics were written by an Englishman!

Author Malachy McCourt unravels the mystery of "Danny Boy," perhaps the most popular Irish song ever. Turns out, the famed lyrics were written by an Englishman! More information. Article by. IrishCentral.

Everyone can hum this haunting Irish ballad that inevitably brings a tear to the eye. The most requested Irish song, it has been recorded by a variety of performers ranging from Elvis Presley, Bing Crosby, and Kate Smith to the Pogues. The complete story of this moving tune has been shrouded in mystery until now. Where did "Danny Boy" originate, who actually wrote the lyrics, and is it even Irish? Acclaimed novelist, actor, memoirist, screenwriter, playwright, and raconteur, Malachy McCourt, turns his Irish eye to the song's complex history and myths in an eloquent ode to this classic. He traces the evolution of the music, which is one of more than 100 songs composed to the very same tune, including the familiar "Londonderry Air," and explores the enduring mystique of "Danny Boy" in an unforgettable tribute that brilliantly weaves history with folklore.

Comments

Mejora Mejora
Love the Pictures-no history---But when ordering be carefull---I was going for Danny Boy the History of the Ballad, I clicked on the used-hardcover option (Caution Here) this picture showed up, books come out different editions--so I thought nothing about the cover being different than the book I thought I was ordering. But this is not the 1 I planned on ordering.

Upon retracing my steps I found the problem-the add is misleading--I'm flummexed.
I went to found the book-clicked on the used hardcopy version, now I got the book I thought I was ordering in the First place.

I don't know who writes these adds, but B CAREFUL___READ, Double Check B 4 U send in UR order. JT
Dianalmeena Dianalmeena
I wasn't sure it would hold my attention, but it did and I'm very glad I read it. It is a classic song that has been passed down through the generations and claimed by more than one country. I stirs the blood and brings tears to the eyes of the toughest men and women. The history of this ballad is fascinating. Reading this makes me appreciate the song all the more. If you love history, or music, you will find this interesting.
Tar Tar
Malachy McCourt is always fun to read, very conversational like a chat on a barstool. I never gave much thought to Danny Boy and where it came from so I certainly never knew it was written by an English lawyer. Throws in interesting look at Derry v Londonderry and being Catholic in Northern Ireland.
energy breath energy breath
You learn something new nearly every page. A great writer!
Wire Wire
This is NOT a little book that tells the story of the song---its history, composer, etc.---as one might expect, but a cheesy miniature book whose text is simply the lyrics of the song. Went right into the wastepaper basket.
Thetahuginn Thetahuginn
Somewhat interesting.
Brol Brol
Beyond question, the melody variously known as "Danny Boy" or "Londonderry Air" is one of the great tunes of all time. Its measured rising and falling cadences would grace the catalog of Franz Schubert or any of the other great classical vocal composers.
Malachy McCourt, brother of novelist Frank McCourt (ANGELA'S ASHES) and a well-known writer and radio-TV luminary in his own right, has produced a curious little book of less than 95 pages about the famous tune and its well-known lyrics. His book is part history, part speculation, part myth and part personal editorial essay. And it is not free from touches of Irish blarney.
McCourt's findings may surprise --- and dismay --- many. The great tune, long since adopted as a kind of unofficial Irish national anthem, may not be of Irish origin. A folklorist named Jane Ross supposedly first noted it down around 1851. She reportedly heard it played by a blind fiddler, Jimmy McCurry, in Limavady, Londonderry --- but there is at least a possibility that the melody may have originated in Scotland. No one knows for sure. At least one respected musical scholar claims that the tune follows no known metric scheme for Irish folk music.
Many different sets of words were attached to the tune after its first publication in 1855 --- but those that have become indissolubly identified with it ("O Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling, from glen to glen and down the mountainside....") were written in 1910 by an English lawyer and song-lyric cobbler named Frederick E. Weatherly, who probably never set foot in Ireland. They were actually intended for a different tune, but when Weatherly's sister-in-law sent him some years later the familiar melody from her home in Australia, he saw that it was a perfect fit for his earlier verses. Thus an "Irish" classic was created from a melody that may be Scottish and words by an Englishman.
McCourt gives us this information straightforwardly enough, but he fleshes them out with a good deal of barely relevant material. It seems strange to arraign a book of 95 pages on charges of padding, but the complaint seems justified. McCourt solicited opinions about the song from Irish celebrities (including brother Frank) and speculates at length on such side issues as who is singing the song and to whom it is addressed (one possibility among several: it is the song of Danny Boy's gay lover!). The author's tone varies between straight historical writing and folksiness, including occasional cutesy use of "tis" and "t'was." McCourt also grinds a personal axe or two. He thinks ill of those Catholic dioceses that have banned the singing of "Danny Boy" at funerals because it is "secular."
There are some fascinating bits of trivia here, however. Victorians hesitated to refer to the song as Londonderry Air because, to their prudish ears, it sounded too much like "London derriere." Irish nationalists never use that title either, because they want no mention of London in the title. Wordsmith Weatherly was once in legal partnership with one of the sons of Charles Dickens. And another of Weatherly's lyrics was the popular "Roses of Picardy," set to music memorably by Haydn Wood. Wood studied under the composer Sir Charles Stanford, who quoted "Londonderry Air" in one of his Irish rhapsodies. Make of that what you will. This is a curious little book, entertaining in its quirky way but almost undone by its relentless folksiness. "Londonderry Air" remains a musical treasure, regardless of its origin.
--- Reviewed by Robert Finn
An elegant, though slight, book that examines the origins, influences and impacts of one of the world's most beloved ballads. More of an essay than a full volume, and while it contains some interesting anecdotes and observations, for me the author never really gets to the heart of Danny Boy, what it is about this beautiful tune and words that haunts people so, that resonates down the ages and brings comfort and sadness in equal measures to all those who hear it. Perhaps it is beyond the remit of any author though, even one as Irish to his bones as McCourt, to articulate the ineffable, and ultimately his story fails to truly convince or engage. A beautifully presented little book, but more style over substance.