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eBook Miles: The Autobiography ePub

eBook Miles: The Autobiography ePub

by Quincy Troupe,LeVar Burton,Miles Davis

  • ISBN: 0944993621
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Quincy Troupe,LeVar Burton,Miles Davis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Audio Literature; Abridged edition (April 1, 1998)
  • ePub book: 1451 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1300 kb
  • Other: txt azw mobi mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 773

Description

Miles, the autobiography/Miles Davis with Quincy Troupe. He grew up there on a farm that his father, Miles Dewey Davis I, owned. My grandfather was a book-keeper, so good at what he did he did it for white people and made a whole lot of money.

Miles, the autobiography/Miles Davis with Quincy Troupe. 1st Touchstone ed. p. cm. "A Touchstone booh. He bought five hundred acres of land in Arkan-sas around the turn of the century. When he bought all that land, the white people in the area who had used him to straighten out their financial matters, their money books, turned against him. Ran him off his land. In their minds, a black man wasn't supposed to have all that land and all that money.

Miles Davis (Author), Quincy Troupe (Author), LeVar Burton (Narrator), Phoenix Audio (Publisher) & 1 more

Miles Davis (Author), Quincy Troupe (Author), LeVar Burton (Narrator), Phoenix Audio (Publisher) & 1 more. One final note about the read of the book: I like how Davis gives readers insight on how jazz slowly dies through progression of music and the emergence of Funk and "White Rock" and "Hillbilly music". He explains how the music (jazz) becomes white washed and another stolen item from the black experience.

Miles Davis brings in this book what he brings in his trumpet playing: a unique, totally fascinating voice. Read this passage: "After 'd been with us a while and then after Trane came back, the sound of the band just kept getting thicker and thicker, almost like when a woman uses too much makeup.

By Scott Gutterman with Miles Davis. Miles: The Autobiography. By Miles Davis with Quincy Troupe. Miles Davis: The Complete Illustrated History. Miles Davis on Apple Music.

Miles: The Autobiography By Miles Davis with Quincy Troupe. Miles: The Autobiography, like Miles himself, holds nothing back. Universally acclaimed as a musical genius, Miles Davis was one of the most important and influential musicians in the world. Here, Miles speaks out about his extraordinary life. The man who gave us some of the most exciting music of the twentieth century here gives us a compelling and fascinating autobiography, featuring a concise discography and thirty-two pages of photographs.

Miles Davis (1926-1991) was a musical genius and innovative trumpet stylist who profoundly influenced modern jazz and popular music. He was intimate with such legendary jazz figures as Charlie Parker, Dizzie Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, and Charlie Mingus. In his own words - and with no punches pulled - he tells here of the people and forces which shaped his musical life. People Who Liked Miles Also Liked These Free Titles

Miles Davis, Quincy Troupe. LeVar Burton (Narrator). Miles: The Autobiography (Hardcover). Published February 22nd 1990 by Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

Miles Davis, Quincy Troupe. ISBN: 0944993621 (ISBN13: 9780944993620). Hardcover, 400 pages.

Miles Davis (Author), Quincy Troupe (Collaborator). The brilliant bad man of jazz trumpetry unburdens himself of his hate and anger as well as of his good feelings about life, friendship, sex, drugs, women and cars. On almost any score this is a remarkable book," observed PW. Photos. San Francisco ChronicleThis is not just any book

Trumpeter Miles Davis (1926-1991) is a legend in jazz. LeVar Burton gives a sparkling reading of this skillfully crafted abridgment of Davis's lengthy autobiography. Davis describes his life and feelings graphically. His vocabulary is rough, but that's part of the jazz scene.

Trumpeter Miles Davis (1926-1991) is a legend in jazz. One wishes for more Miles Davis music throughout. The few pieces presented are unobtrusive. Despite condensation, the listener is left with the feeling that he or she hasn't been shortchanged.

The jazz legend discusses his legendary forty-year career, describing music's "cool" era and fusion movement and offering candid views on fellow musicians, promoters, producers, critics, and his personal life.

Comments

Nagor Nagor
This book was really awesome! I am a young, beginner jazz enthusiast so I started with the King of jazz and worked my way around. I made a great choice. Not only does Miles give a great account of his music, but also recollects other notable musicians in the process. Which makes it worth wild to study their music further too. I thought this book was going to read like a memoir, you know very tight and numerical and mostly personal, and I was wrong. But its in a good way Davis moves from person to person, place to place and it keeps readers (at least me) on their heels. The first thing I ever heard about Miles Davis (way before I discovered his music) was that he was mean, disrespectful, and cold. Miles confirms these personality traits but he also justifies them in an odd but believable way. He made me understand why he grew so cold and by the end of the book (the last few pages I'm on now) he makes me sympathize with him.

I have read many reviews about the book and most are correct. He is bold in this book, holds no punches, tells no colorful stories (I still can't get the taxi cab story with Bird out of my head), and he remains upfront and personal throughout the read. Some say he is simply racist, contradictory, and hateful toward his musical peers, but those people fail to understand the story of black folk. The whole of this nation and the western world is one big contradiction and I think, indirectly, Davis displays this fact through his references to events and stuff in his life. And as for disrespecting other legends, he doesn't do this in a way that demonizes them. He gives Bird the worst time (second to maybe Coltrane or Monk) but at the same time he explains how he worshiped the jazz god. For the most part, everything Davis explains is true about the story of our people and our music and lifestyle. If you don't like it, you may find that you are apart of the problem, black or white. This book isn't a literacy masterpiece but I truly believe Davis put his feelings into this good read and that makes it a must read for music lovers.

One final note about the read of the book: I like how Davis gives readers insight on how jazz slowly dies through progression of music and the emergence of Funk and "White Rock" and "Hillbilly music". He explains how the music (jazz) becomes white washed and another stolen item from the black experience. He also gives a great account of his own progression through the years of bebop, ballad, "cool", fusion, and free jazz forms. This book is cool, hip, and truthful.

On the shape of the book: Seller described it as in good shape but a bit worn and it was. There was now notes or marks inside and that made me very happy. Came before it was scheduled to, but who complains about stuff like that? Not me!
Tyler Is Not Here Tyler Is Not Here
This book is intense. You really feel that you get an insider's view of Miles' life, unedited and unabridged. There is a great deal of interesting stories about the best jazz musicians, but also rich stories of Miles' personal life that are very raw and unapologetic.
The author, Quincy Troupe, does an amazing job conjuring Miles' voice and giving it life on the page. This is one of the best books about music history that you can possibly buy, and perhaps on of the best autobiographies as well. Superb!
Cordalas Cordalas
I knew Miles Davis.I am also from the midwest. I appreciated the author's rendering of the story which smacked of deep truths about growing up and living in the midwestern part of the country, in an America deeply steeped in White racism...and the bridge to New York as Miles stretched out musically to become a Master in his legacy of influence in the music and music industry. Miles Davis is dead...long live Miles Davis.
Aiata Aiata
Miles Davis brings in this book what he brings in his trumpet playing: a unique, totally fascinating voice. Read this passage: "After [Cannonball]'d been with us a while and then after Trane came back, the sound of the band just kept getting thicker and thicker, almost like when a woman uses too much makeup ... Trane would play some weird, great s***, and Cannonball would take it in the other direction, and I would put my sound right down the middle or float over it, or whatever ... And then Paul's anchoring all this creative tension between the horns, and Red's laying down his light, hip s***, and Philly Joe pushing everything with that hip s*** he was playing and then sending us all off again with the hip-de-dip, slick rim shots that were so bad, them 'Philly licks.' Man, that was too hip and bad" (222). Besides the music, Miles opens up about his failed marriages, heroin addiction, various encounters with the police, and a whole lot of other stuff as well. He has a lot of really weird beliefs: "I'm a number six in numerology, a perfect six, and six is the number of the Devil. I think I have a lot of the devil in me" (136). And with Spotify, you can find all the music he references very easily. I highly recommend this work.
FLIDER FLIDER
Finally I got this booK!!!!

I had been waiting for the book. Finally, it arrived and I could not put it down. However, this book is not for the faint hearted!!! The book has language, very raw, and personal descriptions of some very famous people that is explicit. Miles Davis was not only an outstanding musician, but a vivid observer of lives and living as well. The book is filled with interesting, powerful and intimate story, and solid information about Jazz and music. Sometimes, most times, the sharing, the tales, are redundant, verbose, the same story retold in several chapters.( The book could have used some good editing.) but that dose not take away from the interesting and informative reading.