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eBook Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera (The Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies) ePub

eBook Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera (The Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies) ePub

by Beth L. Glixon

  • ISBN: 0754629015
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Beth L. Glixon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 28, 2010)
  • Pages: 514
  • ePub book: 1905 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1245 kb
  • Other: docx azw mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 427

Description

The study of opera in the second half of the eighteenth century has flourished during the last several decades, and our knowledge .

The study of opera in the second half of the eighteenth century has flourished during the last several decades, and our knowledge of the operas written during that period and of their aesthetic, social, and political context has vastly increased. This volume explores opera and operatic life of th. ardback – 2010-12-23 Routledge The Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies. In addition to investigations of extant scores and librettos, scholars have dealt with the associated areas of dance and scenery, as well as newer disciplines such as studies of patronage, gender, and.

While most of the essays in the volume pertain to Italian opera, others concern opera production in France, England . The Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies.

While most of the essays in the volume pertain to Italian opera, others concern opera production in France, England, Spain and the Germanic countries. here is much here to stimulate and enhance the enjoyment of the thoughtful opera-goer, while at the same time there is much food for thought for performers, and above all producer. Opera. Beth L. Glixon, Dr, University of Kentucky, USA. About the Series. Learn mor. ubject Categories.

Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera by Beth L. Glixon . Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies

Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies. Contents: Introduction; Part I 17th-Century Opera: The Early Years: Singing Orfeo: on the performers of Monteverdi's first opera, Tim Carter; Training a singer for Musica Recitativa in early 17th-century Italy: the case of Baldassare, John Walter Hill; Re-voicing Arianna (and laments): two women respond, Suzanne G. Cusick.

The book was a great resource for my talk on madness in opera because it discusses the developnment of the mad scene and its conventions in this period.

In this elegantly constructed study of the early decades of public opera, the conflicts and cooperation of poets, composers, managers, designers, and singers―producing the art form that was soon to sweep the world and that has been dominant ever since―are revealed in their first freshness. This will be a standard work on the subject of the rise of Venetian opera for decades. The book was a great resource for my talk on madness in opera because it discusses the developnment of the mad scene and its conventions in this period.

Glixon, Beth . ed. Studies in Seventeenth-Century Opera. Ashgate Library of Essays in Opera Studies 1. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2010. E-mail Citation . The volume comprises reprints of important essays on 17th-century opera, by some of the leading post-1990 scholars, including Ellen Rosand, Wendy Heller, Margaret Murata, Louise Stein, John Hill, Lois Rosow, Rebecca Harris-Warrick, Beth Glixon, Colin Timms, and Tim Carter. The essays are preceded by a historiographical introduction to 17th-century opera in Italy, France, Spain, England, and Germany. Grout, Donald Jay. A Short History of Opera.

In ury Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment. Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring ornate costumes and set design along with dancing and music. As ambitious works of theater, these productions required not only significant financial backing, but also strong managers to oversee several months of rehearsals and performances

Theoretical statements of the time about opera are scant and contradictory, their authors disinclined to take up political .

Theoretical statements of the time about opera are scant and contradictory, their authors disinclined to take up political issues. Some of the political content is glaringly obvious (the allegory in Dryde'ns and Grabu's Albion and Albanius); some of it is sharply disputed. 1 For the most important studies of allegory in opera in this period, see Price, Curtis . ‘Political Allegory in tury English Opera’, Music and Theatre: Essays in Honour of Winton Dean, ed. Fortune, Nigel (Cambridge, 1987), 1–29, and Walkling, Andrew . ‘Court, Culture, and Politics in Restoration England: Charles II, James II, and the Performance of Baroque Monarchy’, P.

17th-century Venetian Opera

17th-century Venetian Opera. An approach to the expressive content of late seventeenth-century arias: Antonio Sartorio’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto (1677)’, Il teatro musicale italiano nel Sacro Romano Impero nei secoli XVII e XVIII, eds. Alberto Colzani et al, (Como: .

In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment. As ambitious works of theater, these productions required not only significant financial backing, but also strong managers to oversee several months of rehearsals and performances.

By Beth L. Glixon and Jonathan E. One of the hazards of studying opera in the seventeenth century is that many of the operas have not been recorded. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. xxvi, 398 p. ISBN 0-195-15416-9. As they make clear in the preface, Beth and Jonathan Glixon have been working on this book for many years, and their work is both long awaited and well worth the wait. Inventing the Business of Opera is not intended for the casual reader; it jumps headfirst into the business of opera in its earliest commercial period.

The past four decades have seen an explosion in research regarding seventeenth-century opera. In addition to investigations of extant scores and librettos, scholars have dealt with the associated areas of dance and scenery, as well as newer disciplines such as studies of patronage, gender, and semiotics. While most of the essays in the volume pertain to Italian opera, others concern opera production in France, England, Spain and the Germanic countries.