cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Genesis Of A Music (Music Book Index)
eBook Genesis Of A Music (Music Book Index) ePub

eBook Genesis Of A Music (Music Book Index) ePub

by Harry Partch

  • ISBN: 0781296455
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Harry Partch
  • Publisher: Reprint Services Corp (January 1949)
  • ePub book: 1839 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1224 kb
  • Other: docx doc lit azw
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 883

Description

Partch Harry Genesis of a Music 2nd ed.

Partch Harry Genesis of a Music 2nd ed.

Genesis Of A Music book. Harry Partch's pioneering theoretical investigations of tuning and his practical application of these investigations to instruments of his own construction show him to be a composer of remarkable and enduring individuality.

Genesis of a Music is a book first published in 1949 by microtonal composer Harry Partch (1901–1974). Partch first presents a polemic against both equal temperament and the long history of stagnation in the teaching of music; according to Alex Ross,. Partch first presents a polemic against both equal temperament and the long history of stagnation in the teaching of music; according to Alex Ross, this is "the most startling forty-five-page history of music ever written".

Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music is therefore invaluable, dealing as it does in detail with the composer's inventions . This is the ultimate reference book for anyone experimenting with tunings. Partch's music may not be your cup of tea, but the logic behind it is top notch

Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music is therefore invaluable, dealing as it does in detail with the composer's inventions of microtonal musical instruments and his compositional method using a 43-tone scale. Partch's music may not be your cup of tea, but the logic behind it is top notch. With this book and his home-made instuments (there are pictures and descriptions), Partch kicked open the door for the modern micro-tonal movement. The musical universe will never be the same.

Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music is therefore invaluable, dealing as it does in detail with the composer's inventions of. .

Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music is therefore invaluable, dealing as it does in detail with the composer's inventions of microtonal musical instruments and his compositional method using a 43-tone scale. -John Cage show more. Harry Partch (1901-1974) was an American composer, music theorist, and creator of musical instruments. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

4 people like this topic. It's free and anyone can join.

Download Now. saveSave Partch Harry Genesis of a Music 2nd Ed For Later. 343 views Download as PDF or read online from Scribd. Flag for inappropriate content. Partch Harry Genesis of a Music 2nd Ed. Uploaded by. Renato Fasano Moraes. Download as PDF or read online from Scribd.

Bibliography on Harry Partch: p. 475-483. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by paul nguyen on June 10, 2009.

Composer : Partch, Harry. Instrumentation : orchestra.

Piano, Harpsichord, Harp. Keyboard, Electronic Organ. Composer : Partch, Harry.

Comments

Paster Paster
Partch is focused on the natural and the clear, which is refreshing. I think his sense of art is strange, but he's a very sound mathematician and builder. I wonder if they let you play his instruments in the museum... it would be a cruel irony if they featured 'Do Not Touch' signs like the museums Partch degrades in the book.

I used to be very infatuated with Partch for his discovery, and he has certainly done a lot. However, because his instruments are inaccessible to most of us, and because I prefer less notes in my just scales, I'm going to play other kinds of music (but NOT necessarily 12 equal!).

It's nice to see someone else so hilariously impassioned against 12-tone equal temperament.
Nern Nern
It's Harry Partch's book! He goes into detail about his thoughts / ideas / how he built his instruments etc.
What else needs to be said? This is frigging aaaaawesome!

Somebody else I discovered lately is Bart Hopkin, who writes books in this similar experimental vein.
I have just written some reviews for his books this minute, and since it doesn't look like he's getting much attention on amazon, but I think if you like Partch, and you like building weird instruments / getting strange sounds, "Genesis of a Music" and Bart Hopkin books are my favourites on this subject so far.
Xanzay Xanzay
Hello Amazon book buyers!

The book I ordered arrived quickly and came just as good as (or slightly better than) advertised. In general I have had great luck with private amazon book vendors. Here's another one to add to my list :)

I gave 5 stars for fast service--book was shipped the same day I ordered it. Also because the book came in great condition. Really, what else could any of us realistically ask for?

I would highly recommend this seller.

Happy Reading!
WOGY WOGY
Instrument builders 300 or so years ago tried to do the same thing, and failed. Mr. Partch didn't have much better luck than they did.
Bodwyn Bodwyn
I have a B.A. in music, and I've been an avid student of music theory for the last 23 years. Yet, by the sixth chapter, I had to stop reading. I love Partch's music, and his iconoclasm, hence why I bought the book. But, he's extremely intellectual, and he failed to explain these advanced concepts in an accessible manner. The material is simply beyond the reach of anyone except musical scholars and/or mathematicians. Even a genius such as Stephen Hawking takes the time to break down complex ideas using easy to follow examples and simple analogies to common day-to-day ideas in his books.
Partch, on the other hand, inhabits a rarefied intellectual realm, and he makes no effort to climb down from his high perch of mind-numbingly complex ideas to reach us mere mortals. I find it almost laughably ludicrous that he claims that his book doesn't require much knowledge of music theory.

So, unless you're well versed in intonation and temperament, and fluent in all the math and science that accompanies those subjects, I recommend you stay away from this book until you master those subjects.
Silver Globol Silver Globol
I read this book a very long time ago - perhaps almost 40 years. Yet I remember it still, because it introduces new ways of thinking of music. I'd say anyone interested in Americana, the arts, or music in particular (though Partch is keen to integrate it with other arts) should read this book.
Gardataur Gardataur
As a steel guitarist, I find the entire subject of Just Intonation (JI) fascinating. It's a beautiful sound, perfectly aligned with the laws of physics. Partch's book includes tables of all of the JI ratios, translated into cents. This is the ultimate reference book for anyone experimenting with tunings.
Partch's music may not be your cup of tea, but the logic behind it is top notch. With this book and his home-made instuments (there are pictures and descriptions), Partch kicked open the door for the modern micro-tonal movement. The musical universe will never be the same.
I disagree that you shouldn't start with this book. Most books that even mention the subject of JI gloss over it, insult your intelligence without providing any real data to make your own decisions, because most of the people writing those books consider JI a curiosity. If you ever read more than one reference to JI, you already know most of what most sources tell you.

Partch is certainly bombastic, which gave me many a chuckle. He was very very defensive, with good reason.

He also deals with subharmonic series- minor tonalities- which makes up a full half of his system, and which is explicitly eschewed by Doty's Primer. Doty denies there is any consonance to it and refuses to discuss it, reducing every harmony into least-common-denominators to find some sort of "absolute consonance level", which results in ratios with huge numbers that tell you nothing about the purpose of the chord. For a minor triad, Partch would say "1/4;1/5;1/6" and Doty would say 10:12:15. Partch also backs his ideas up with everyone from Archytas to Ptolemy to Galilei.

Any other book about or by Partch is focused on the novelty of his instruments, his "43 notes!!!" (which sickened him, being that he often used more or less in various pieces- it is not about the number of notes) or his feelings on life and aesthetics. Partch despised concert music- which doesn't mean a thing to me. This book gives you the facts, the background to actually be able to use the innovations Partch gave to the world.

I would recommend, in addition to this, reading George A. Miller's essay "The Magical Number 7, +/- 2" and any resources you can find on Gestalt perception and the Law of Pragnanz. Without these fundamental perceptual ideas, your 10,000-note octaves will sound like chaos.