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eBook The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century ePub

eBook The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century ePub

by Alex Ross

  • ISBN: 143320794X
  • Category: Music
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Alex Ross
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio Inc.; Unabridged edition (December 1, 2007)
  • ePub book: 1636 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1570 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 728

Description

The Rest is Noise is mainly a history book, charting the careers of many of the 20th century composers, ranging from early innovators like Schoenberg and Stravinsky to modern minimalists such as La Monte Young and Phillip Glass.

The Rest is Noise is mainly a history book, charting the careers of many of the 20th century composers, ranging from early innovators like Schoenberg and Stravinsky to modern minimalists such as La Monte Young and Phillip Glass. Throughout the book, Ross makes an effort to show the cultural and historical events that cause the composers to write. Ross also spends the time to describe the pieces that he is writing about and gives the reader a musical breakdown of the pieces

The Rest Is Noise book. The Twentieth Century. You may think of Rothko paintings.

The Rest Is Noise book. Take a walk on the wild side.

This immensely ambitious book aims not only to conduct a survey of 20th-century classical composition but to come up with a history of that century as. .The Rest Is Noise is a work of immense scope and ambition.

This immensely ambitious book aims not only to conduct a survey of 20th-century classical composition but to come up with a history of that century as refracted through its music. The idea is not simply to conduct a survey of 20th-century classical composition but to come up with a history of that century as refracted through its music. We start with Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss, the titans of Austro-German music in Graz, on May 16, 1906. Strauss is there to conduct a performance of his opera Salome.

Music critic Alex Ross shines a bright light on this secret world .

Music critic Alex Ross shines a bright light on this secret world, taking us from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia to New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, and riots. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music. From publisher description. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Alex Ross, critic for the New Yorker and author of The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the 20th . Alex Ross: Well, I grew up as really a sort of full-on classical music geek

Alex Ross, critic for the New Yorker and author of The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the 20th Century discusses the challenges of writing about recent musical history, especially when your intended audience ranges from expert musicologists to interested non-specialists. Alex Ross: Well, I grew up as really a sort of full-on classical music geek. I would say I listened exclusively to music from about 1750 to 1890, starting with Mozart and maybe a little bit of Bach, and ending with Brahms. That was where I was until I had a wonderful piano teacher who started introducing me to 20th-century music. His name was Denning Barnes, and he was a composer as well as a pianist.

Nelson Alexander "Alex" Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. Ross is known for his love of the vintage looks of classic characters and the more mythic elements of the superheroes. From the late 1990s, Ross has done much work for the industry’s two largest and most historically important publishing houses, Marvel and DC Comics, but Ross is also the co-creator of "Astro City", an original series that explores superhero mythology.

The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century. Ross, in this sweeping and dramatic narrative, takes us from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken.

Электронная книга "The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century", Alex Ross. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Alex Ross’s enthralling history of twentieth-century music is one of those books’. Twentieth-century classical composition, the subject of this book, sounds like noise to many. It is a largely untamed art, an unassimilated underground. While the splattered abstractions of Jackson Pollock sell on the art market for a hundred million dollars or more, and while experimental works by Matthew Barney or David Lynch are analyzed in college dorms across the land, the equivalent in music still sends ripples of unease through concert audiences and makes little perceptible impact on the outside world.

The Rest is Noise combines scrupulous and inventive analyses of the 20th century’s music with lavish care .

The Rest is Noise combines scrupulous and inventive analyses of the 20th century’s music with lavish care over that music’s improvised history’. ADAM THIRLWELL, Guardian, Books of the Year. ROBERT SANDALL, Sunday Times, Books of the Year.

The scandal over modern music has not died down. While modern paintings by Picasso and Pollock sell for a hundred million or more, shocking musical works from Stravinsky's Rite of Spring onward still send ripples of unease through audiences. Yet the influence of modern sound can be felt everywhere. Alex Ross, the brilliant music critic for the New Yorker, shines a bright light on this secret world and shows how it has pervaded every corner of twentieth century life.

The Rest Is Noise takes the listener inside the labyrinth of modern sound, from turn-of-the-century Vienna to bohemian Paris, from Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We meet the maverick personalities who have defied the classical past, and we follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics on this sweeping tour of twentieth century history through its music.

Comments

Arlelond Arlelond
Every page of this incredibly vivid guidebook to music requires that you read a subchapter and then spend a day or two just listening and then reread the subchapter. While that might sound like an unpleasant homework assignment to Some for those of us who are truly obsessed with the joys music provides it is the most profound pleasure. Many composers who I thought I knew and liked for the right reasons I have learned so much more about (some unpleasant-as in Virgil Thompson's casual racism) the chapter on how Shostakovich negotiated making art under Stalin is deeply complex and Sympathetic. This is a life changing book in that my experience of music will be enriched by Alex Ross unforgettable storytelling, deep research, willingness to explore the politics of the time and great descriptive musical analysis.
Doukree Doukree
When most people think about classical composition, they think of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach and other old composers. However, even in the 20th century, classical composition is alive and well. Rather than looking at classical music as a time period, it is more akin to a style of composing. The 20th century has been filled with fascinating classical compositions by huge personalities that deliberate tried to bend and break the rules of composition. As history marched on, the composers of our era were at the mercy of dictators, world calamities and shifting social trends. Out of all the periods of classical composition, the 20th century was the most complex and interesting. Music critic Alex Ross spent years researching the history of these 20th century composers and his research paid off with the wonderful book The Rest is Noise.

This is another book that I found by looking at the reading lists of members of Radiohead. I think that this recommendation came from Colin Greenwood. The Rest is Noise is mainly a history book, charting the careers of many of the 20th century composers, ranging from early innovators like Schoenberg and Stravinsky to modern minimalists such as La Monte Young and Phillip Glass. Throughout the book, Ross makes an effort to show the cultural and historical events that cause the composers to write. Ross also spends the time to describe the pieces that he is writing about and gives the reader a musical breakdown of the pieces. A lot of the book spends time discussing why a composer such as Schoenberg was innovative and why his music sounds the way it does. I was really impressed by these parts, because I was able to better appreciate a lot of classical pieces that I enjoyed. I was able to understand why they had such a distinctive sound and why they were innovative. Ross does need a bit of outside study. I had to brush up on my musical theory to better understand why he was talking about, but that knowledge is not absolutely necessary to understanding the book. You can get by without it, but putting in a little work outside of The Rest is Noise really helps the reader understand what Ross is talking about.

The history portions of the book were superb. Ross not only gives a good overview of the history of music but also a good overview of 20th century history. It was really fascinating to read about some of the untold stories that occurred during historical events, such as Richard Strauss’s actions in Nazi Germany or Shostakovich’s problems in the Soviet Union. I was really able to understand why modern composers wrote the way that they did and what trials they went through for their music. Often times, it is hard to understand what they composers are going through when listening to classical music. We have been trained to listen to pop music were the singer tells us what he or she is thinking. Instrumental music can be a little tougher. Alex Ross does an excellent job helping the reader hear between the notes of the music and understand what the music actually means.

I also enjoyed the sheer amount of music that Alex Ross discusses. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of classical composition and I was really thrilled to get some new pieces to listen to. I was especially happy to get a lot of recommendations for listening to post-war avant-garde music. That is such an odd genre to get into, and Ross does job discussing how it came about and what music to listen to if one was interested in that period. In The Rest is Noise, Ross goes beyond the normal “textbook” pieces and really gets into some obscure stuff, and I was happy to discover some new avant-garde pieces that I have never heard before (even if I am still trying to figure out what they actually mean.) Even though Ross is very knowledgeable about music, his writing never felt pretentious. He even spent the time to discuss popular music, with sections devoted to The Velvet Underground and shout-outs to The Beatles, Sufjan Stevens, Radiohead and Sonic Youth. I was really glad to see that Ross was open-minded enough to recognize other genres as being great music.

I would highly recommend The Rest is Noise. For people interested in classical music, it is a must read. Your knowledge and understanding of 20th century classical music will be broadened and become more complex. This is also a great book for people who just have a passing interest in that genre and want to gain more than just a passing understanding of classical composition. This is a great book.

Full review on http://zacherybrasier.wordpress.com/2014/08/28/the-rest-is-noise-alex-ross/
Brightfury Brightfury
If you have even the slightest interest in 20th century classical music, this book is truly extraordinary. The author's research and knowledge base is just remarkable. The book feels like three lifetimes worth of effort. Every sentence matters, so it's a slow, but very satisfying read. I only just discovered that Ross is the music critic for the New Yorker.

What really makes the book so special is Ross's ability to write about the pieces and composers in a way that even a non musical person like me can appreciate, explaining what each composer was trying to achieve, the musical tools they used in the context of the times, and how they were influenced by other composers, as well as how they were influenced by their contemporary artistic and political culture. There is naturally a lot of crossover in to jazz, folk, and even rock and roll. Ross is very analytical while almost never being judgmental, and he puts everything in context. He writes with a clear and infectious enthusiasm that never feels overdone.
Shalizel Shalizel
I have been a professional musician for 40 years. Played blues, rock, jazz and classical. Studied 20th century serial composition in college, but this really opened my eyes to the musical timeline for modern classical. Recommend listening to the composer as you read about him. The analysis of style and function are right on. Unlike some books on the classical genre, this has a sense of humor and is engagingly written.
shustrik shustrik
The writer seems very intelligent and very knowledgeable, and he's a good writer. But I had to give up reading the book because my bs meter kept going in the red, and the ratio of bs to interesting, good to know information, was too high. I have to admit that he's made me try harder to appreciate modern music (12-tone as opposed to mainly diatonic, and a higher level of dissonance in music). I'm getting there. I should also admit that I've been reading kind of a lot of science, which does not allow for any bs. Plus I simply disagree with his view on some composers and their music.
Winawel Winawel
This book is as interesting and witty as it is informative. I had to buy it for a graduate music course and actually looked forward to doing my assigned reading every week. It's written simply enough for a non-musical person to enjoy and learn, but detailed and thought-provoking enough for graduate music students to discuss and debate. If you want a book that covers every composer in the 20th century with extreme detail and examples pulled from scores, then a textbook would be much better suited. Ross gives a voice to some of the lesser known composers and the context in which they worked. Wonderful read!