cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Things As They Are: Photojournalism in Context Since 1955
eBook Things As They Are: Photojournalism in Context Since 1955 ePub

eBook Things As They Are: Photojournalism in Context Since 1955 ePub

by Christian Caujolle,Mary Panzer

  • ISBN: 1597110140
  • Category: Photography and Video
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Christian Caujolle,Mary Panzer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Aperture; First Edition edition (March 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1829 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1972 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 508

Description

Things as They Are is not a book designed to make its owner feel comfortable. Mary Panzer's introduction does a neat job of describing photojournalism from past decades and her captions for each photographer and publication are spot-on.

Things as They Are is not a book designed to make its owner feel comfortable. It exists to provoke-and make one appreciate the rare photographers and even rarer publications still loyal to that mission.

Things as They Are book. Start by marking Things as They Are: Photojournalism in Context Since 1955 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mary Panzer, Christian Caujolle. The stories are presented in context-reproduced from the pages of the newspapers and magazines where they originally appeared, as their contemporary public would have experienced them. In this way, Things as They Arereveals how the events of the world, the fine art of photography, and the interests of publishers and the press converged on the printed page.

Description: Things as They Are presents the story of photojournalism over the past five decades, from 1955 until today. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

It takes us from the golden era of the illustrated press-the heyday of Life and Picture Post magazines and the moment of The Museum of Modern Art's defining Family of Man exhibition-to the explosion of digital media in the twenty-first century.

Things as They Are: Photojournalism in Context Since 1955 by Mary Panzer and fr:Christian Caujolle (Boot/Aperture/World Press Photo, 2005). Our True Intent Is All for Your Delight: The John Hinde Butlin's Photographs. Photographs by the John Hinde Studio. In the Wake of Katrina by Larry Towell (2006). People by Stefan Ruiz (2006). The British Landscape by John Davies (2006).

Published by Aperture, 2007. Text by Christian Caujolle, Mary Panzer. Catalog Photo Survey. It takes us from the golden era of the illustrated press-the heyday of Life and Picture Post magazines and the moment of The Museum of Modern Art's defining Family of Man exhibition-to the explosion of digital media in the twenty-first century.

Photojournalism Books. To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: WBJY88MPIP. Things as They Are : Photojournalism in Context Since 1955. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Find nearly any book by Christian Caujolle. by Mary Panzer, Christian Caujolle. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781597110143 (978-1-59711-014-3) Hardcover, Aperture, 2006.

Things as They Are presents the story of photojournalism over the past five decades, from 1955 until today. Published in collaboration with World Press Photo on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, the book takes us from the golden era of the illustrated press--the heyday of Life magazine and Picture Post, and the moment of The Museum of Modern Art's defining Family of Man exhibition--to the twenty-first century's explosion of digital media. This history is told through the presentation of 125 photojournalistic features shot and published around the world, shown in context on the pages of newspapers and magazines as the public originally experienced them. In this way, Things as They Are reveals how the events of the world, the art of photographers and the interests of publishers and the press converged on the printed page. It traces how photojournalism has developed over time alongside changing technology, media, fashions in photography, and a changing world. And it does so using landmark photo-essays from some of the greatest photographers in the world, including W. Eugene Smith, Sebastiao Salgado, Mary Ellen Mark, James Nachtwey, Annie Liebovitz, Nan Goldin and Henri Cartier-Bresson. Each project is accompanied by expert commentary. An international panel of 100 specialists--photographers, editors, art directors, historians and magazine collectors--made the final selections. They chose stories that exemplified the highest quality of work published internationally during each period, stories that demonstrated important innovations in photography and in publishing, and stories that played a key role in shaping the history of photojournalism itself.

Comments

Milleynti Milleynti
Intended to mark the 50th anniversary of World Press Photo, Things As They Are tells the story of the photojournalism of the last half century - in its original context.

The book shows 120 picture essays - dating from the 1940s, but picking up steam with the heyday of Life magazine in the mid-1950s and continuing through a clearly marked trail of bodies and changing attitudes to beauty right up to the present day - in the same way as they were first seen, namely on the pages of newspapers and magazines. By doing so, it manages to present what are (mostly) familiar images in a new light.
LØV€ YØỮ LØV€ YØỮ
I only recently came across this book and it was an especially wonderful find because of the editorial format. To reproduce the photos in the context of their spreads and pages was just right for me as I spent my life as a publication designer. Although it's a celebration of the World Press Photo organization another of the book's strengths is the range of material, not just hard news images but feature photography, so Richard Avedon's 1968 psychedelic Beatles shots are here, a Diane Arbus set for Esquire in 1960 or a series of feet photos for Suddeutsche Zeitung, 2004.

Mary Panzer's introduction does a neat job of describing photojournalism from past decades and her captions for each photographer and publication are spot-on. As a designer I was interested to see how current affairs magazines handled photos and mostly they are left alone on the page to tell their story though Paris Match has an annoying habit of putting text on the photo but unfortunately in a rather un-designed way where as Stern do it in a much more considered way.

I thought the book was a first class survey of journalism in past decades. A similar book is Kiosk. A History of Photojournalism covering the years from 1839 to 1973 and like 'Things as they are' it reproduces photos as they originally appeared on covers and spreads inside magazines.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
Sadaron above the Gods Sadaron above the Gods
Like with everything else, the role of the photojournalist is changing. This book covers the years 1955 to 2005, with each ten year period broken down into a section. For instance, the years 1955 to 1964 is called 'When Magazines Were Big.' This was the time of Life and Look, now both long gone.

As you might expect, most of the pictures show war in one guise or another. The Viet Nam war gets it's own ten year section. But Viet Nam was just one war, this is an international publication so it covers the wars of many countries.

While warfare is a major part of the book, this was also the time of some really great things, like the moon landing and tragedy like Kennedy in Dallas or the tsunami in Southeast Asia.

Seeing photographs like these make me realize how much we miss with the absense of these magazines. Television shows the images, but only for a fleeting moment so that you cannot stay as long as you wish, before you get turned over to some drug company telling you to ask your doctor about their product. This is a great set of pictures.
Gholbithris Gholbithris
Although the book doesn't include World Press Photo's best work (which I was actually hoping for - thus a star less), it's a great overview of the history of photojournalism. And since I am a photojournalist myself, it's a very handy tool for reference and understanding of the development or my profession.