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eBook The New American Ghetto ePub

eBook The New American Ghetto ePub

by Camilo Jose Vergara

  • ISBN: 0813522099
  • Category: Photography and Video
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Camilo Jose Vergara
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rutgers Univ Pr (November 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 235
  • ePub book: 1165 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1101 kb
  • Other: docx rtf azw doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 195

Description

The New American Ghetto Hardcover – November 1, 1995. by Camilo Jose Vergara (Author). Vergara has chronicled life in poor and minority communities across the United States in the New York Times, Atlantic, the Nation, the Village Voice, and other publications

The New American Ghetto Hardcover – November 1, 1995. Vergara has chronicled life in poor and minority communities across the United States in the New York Times, Atlantic, the Nation, the Village Voice, and other publications. Following in the footsteps of 19th-century urban reformer Jacob Riis, the author, through the power of photography, reveals the destitution and vulgarities of urban decay.

Camilo Jose Vergara, a rnalist, has spent the last twelve years photographing the developments of new American ghettos, tracing the deterioration of buildings, and amassing 8,000 slides, half of which are about New York Ghettos

Camilo Jose Vergara, a rnalist, has spent the last twelve years photographing the developments of new American ghettos, tracing the deterioration of buildings, and amassing 8,000 slides, half of which are about New York Ghettos. Using the information he collects, he narrows in on the complex aspects which have lead to the deterioration of these buildings, usually involving the drug trade, and the solutions which attempt to remedy the situation. In this show, Vergara focuses on the ten-year plan begun by the Koch Administration.

Camilo José Vergara (born 1944 in Santiago, Chile) is a Chilean-born, New York-based writer, photographer and documentarian. Vergara has been compared to Jacob Riis for his photographic documentation of American slums and decaying urban environments.

2 people like this topic.

The New American Ghetto book. This book of photographs of . ghettos is terrific--it shows the great diversity in them, from the crowded Los Angeles slums to the desolate portions of Detroit. It is very eye-opening, and also saddening.

Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto, University of Chicago Press, Fall, 2013 Detroit: A Progress ReportSELECTED EXHIBITIONS. Photographer and writer for "The New American Ghetto Archive," a collection of more than 14,000 color slides documenting poor, minority communities throughout the United States. The archive is being catalogued, digitized, and stored for use by scholars.

by Camilo José Vergara. Brings before our reluctant eyes the stark devastation wrought over the last 30 years in the inner city. In image and word, Vergara tells the story eloquently". This book is an undeniable indictment.

The New American Ghetto was a collaborative, multi-media project that addressed the crisis in public housing and urban community development in North American cities.

The New American Ghetto was a collaborative, multi-media project that addressed the crisis in public housing and urban community development in North American cities

by Camilo Jose Vergara. Publisher's Description. The ghetto is as much an intrinsic community of the United States as any other, yet it remains unique in its social and physical isolation from the mainstream.

by Camilo Jose Vergara. This book chronicles, in photographs and text, the transformations and upheavals which American ghettos have experienced since the explosive 1960s.

Photographs reveal the decay in such urban cities as Chicago, Newark, New York, Detroit, and Los Angeles, showing the transformation of certain sites over time, and pointing out the beauty in some of the ruins

Comments

Use_Death Use_Death
Excellent book and I am delighted to be able to share it with my students from both the photograhpy and social justice point of view.
Gogal Gogal
Every few years, the US history books are updated. We've added things like the Civil Rights movement, Gay rights, AIDS, Reagan's "War on Drugs," the internment of Japanese Americans, etc. But one thing we haven't included is how our cities crumbled after WWII. In all US cities, be they Detroit, Newark, Chicago, Bronx, or on the West Coast, inner city neighborhoods all declined. Once the "Levitowns" sprang up, people moved out and the buildings emptied. Some towns, like the Bronx, were made worse by highways. Others, like Detroit, were wrecked by factory closings.

Vergara's photos are a great primary source for teaching history. It's like one of those time-lapse videos of an apple rotting. This, along with "A Time Before Crack" should be shown to kids in US History class. It's time our kids learned a little "street" history.
Venemarr Venemarr
The photographs in this book are gripping. While the narrative is interesting regarding the sociology of the rise (and fall) of the ghetto in several American cities, what is most stunning about this book, perhaps obviously, are the photographs.
How many of us have driven by abandoned or decaying buildings and have either reminisced or have wondered about its history? I think most of us have experienced this. Vergara has captured those moments on film. Yet his interests and the style of his photographs reveal life bursting, or seeping, from behind the apparent emptiness and abandonment. Snippets of conversations or ponderings from those who live in the neighborhoods photographed and quotes from various 'experts' give a framework through which the photographs reveal what is behind the facade.
Graffiti reveals insight and inspiration. And there are various characters outside of the mainstream who find meaning and life in what those who have abandoned these buildings called 'decay'. An intinerant preacher, a modern day Noah and her ark and a whole host of other individuals reveal to us that no matter what it looks like on the outside, there is a spark in all of us that hopes and dreams and envisions a better tomorrow.
This book succeeds on many levels, a sociological level, a picturesque level, a historical level and, most important in my opinion, a human level. It's a book you can peruse over and over again and find something new with each visit.
Gianni_Giant Gianni_Giant
Vergara looks at some major American industrial cities that suffered some horrible disinvestment after World War II. He takes an honest look at the people and buildings in some of America's poorest cities (Camden, Newark, Detroit) and how ugly, cheap, security-conscious and modernistic buildings to serve the ghetto's poor residents have replaced fantastic movie palaces, upscale housing and fading remnants of a wealthier, more egalitarian period in U.S. history.
Vergara's prose gets a bit preachy and predictable at times, but the real strength in this book lies in its collection of bleak photos that make you wonder why this nation abandoned its industrial past so quickly and so thoroughly. They speak more than any words can ever do on the plight of America's cities.
He shines when he looks at how buildings transform over time - some for better, most for worse. The majority of these photos were taken in the early-1990s, as the crack epidemic was at its peak and the double-digit decline in urban crime was just beginning. With crime down and the urban real estate market up, I view these decade-old photos with a mix of sadness and hope.
Vergara's later work, _American Ruins_ does an even better job of looking at how the United States has turned its collective back on its cities. If you read this book, make sure you check out _American Ruins_. They both make Vergara our best chronicler of urban decay.
Bil Bil
This is an excellent book for high school students living in the inner city. We have incorporated this book as part of our curriculum in the Urban Design Studio Project, which is a after school program that introduces high school students living inthe South Bronx to careers in urban planning and architectural studies. Although much has changed in the South Bronx, we still suffer the stigma of a ghetto I believe a second book is in order to show the major changes which have occured since the books publication. There is hope and people by far have improved their living and social economic conditions.
Yozshujind Yozshujind
Slums and ghettos are places that most Americans would care to ignore, but Vergara documents these marginalized "communities" with a personal sincerity and social awareness not often found in this field of study. Those who are involved in bringing back to life the urban cores of American cities would be well-advised to study this book and ponder deeply the author's conclusions. I bought this book today, on a whim, and read it in one sitting. I could not put it down. I'd like to see more works by Mr. Vergara.
OTANO OTANO
Vergara, in a remarkable combination of matchless photography and philosophical but highly informed commentary, chronicles the shameful destruction of some of our most beautiful American cities. His keen insight into the explosion of tastelessness and banality, combined with his careful time lapse documentation of urban decay, provides a sobering record of urban America. Without proselytizing or advocating any particular solutions, this book will help the reader understand the unprecedented task faced by those who would rebuild and re-energize our lost cities. This is the one book I would take to the proverbial desert island--hours of contemplation guaranteed.