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eBook Stones of the Sur: Poetry by Robinson Jeffers, Photographs by Morley Baer ePub

eBook Stones of the Sur: Poetry by Robinson Jeffers, Photographs by Morley Baer ePub

by Morley Baer,James Karman,Robinson Jeffers

  • ISBN: 0804739420
  • Category: Photography and Video
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Morley Baer,James Karman,Robinson Jeffers
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (June 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 176
  • ePub book: 1822 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1970 kb
  • Other: lrf lit txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 890

Description

James Karman was invited by Baer to serve as his collaborator, and has brought the project to completion-more than 50 of Baer's photographs paired with poems by Jeffers (some complete, others excerpted). Winner of the 2016 Oscar Lewis Award, sponsored by the Book Club of California. The precipitous cliffs, rolling headlands, and rocky inlets of the Big Sur coast of California were alive for Robinson Jeffers, and throughout his long career as a poet, he extolled their wild beauty.

This book combines poetry by Jeffers with California landscape photographs by Morley Baer. This is a work of unusual sensitivity that blends two media with personal expressions of two artists of unique stature. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through professionals. The photos stand on their own great merit as does the poetry

Home KARMAN, JAMES Stones of the Sur.

Home KARMAN, JAMES Stones of the Sur. Poetry by Robinson Jeffers Stones of the Sur. Poetry by Robinson Jeffers. Photographs by Morley Baer. Published by University Press, Stanford, 2001. From Rulon-Miller Books (ABAA, ILAB) (St. Paul, MN, . Association Member: ABAA.

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Browse through Robinson Jeffers's poems and quotes  . 141 poems of Robinson Jeffers  . Ave Caesar No bitterness: our ancestors did it. They were.

James Karman was invited by Baer to serve as his collaborator, and has brought the project to completion more than 50 of Baer's photographs paired with poems by Jeffers (some complete, others excerpted). In addition to his own many books, Morley Baer contributed to a publication sponsored by the Sierra Club and guided by Ansel Adams: Not Man Apart, which combined lines from Jeffers's poetry with photographs of the Big Sur coast by Adams, Weston, Eliot Porter, and others.

Stones of the Sur: Poetry by Robinson Jeffers, Photographs by Morley Baer. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. The Wild God of the World: An Anthology of Robinson Jeffers. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003. Bennett, Melba Berry. The Stone Mason of Tor House: The Life and Works of Robinson Jeffers. Los Angeles: The Ward Ritchie Press, 1966. Robinson Jeffers: Poet of California, rev. ed. Brownsville, OR: Story Line Press, 1995. Powell, Lawrence Clark. Robinson Jeffers: The Man & His Work

Robinson Jeffers was born in 1887 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Robinson Jeffers was born in 1887 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Jeffers family frequently traveled to Europe, and Robinson attended boarding schools in Germany and Switzerland. In 1902, Jeffers enrolled in Western University of Pennsylvania; when his family moved to California, he transferred to Presbyterian Occidental College as a junior. Jeffers graduated from college at age 18.

John Robinson Jeffers (January 10, 1887 – January 20, 1962) was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. Much of Jeffers' poetry was written in narrative and epic form

John Robinson Jeffers (January 10, 1887 – January 20, 1962) was an American poet, known for his work about the central California coast. Much of Jeffers' poetry was written in narrative and epic form. However, he is also known for his shorter verse and is considered an icon of the environmental movement.

The precipitous cliffs, rolling headlands, and rocky inlets of the Big Sur coast of California were alive for Robinson Jeffers, and throughout his long career as a poet, he extolled their wild beauty. His vivid descriptions inspired the best work of other artists who lived nearby, including such noted photographers as Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and their younger contemporary Morley Baer. Before he died in 1995, Baer was planning a volume that would bring together a group of his landscape photographs of the Big Sur area with a selection of poems that expressed Jeffers's mystical experience of stone. Jeffers believed that stone is alive, perhaps even conscious in some way. Baer wanted to create a visual and literary meditation on the life-experience of stone. James Karman was invited by Baer to serve as his collaborator, and has brought the project to completion―more than 50 of Baer's photographs paired with poems by Jeffers (some complete, others excerpted). Stones of the Sur is in five parts, each of which takes its title from a poem. Part I, "Tor House," contains photographs and poems about Jeffers's home, ever the locus of his inspiration. Part II, "Continent's End," begins with a panoramic view of the coastline and is followed by visual and textual images that become progressively narrower in scope as Baer and Jeffers focus on the mountains, cliffs, beaches, boulders, rocks, and pebbles of the Big Sur. The inward progression continues in Part III, "Oh Lovely Rock," where Baer trains his lens on close surfaces―revealing his sensibilities at their most abstract. From the middle of Part III on, the spiral is reversed and the view begins to open. Part IV, "Credo," expands outwardly from the pebbles and rocks of the Big Sur back to the beaches, cliffs, and mountains. Part V, "The Old Stone-Mason," concludes the book with a return to Tor House.

Comments

Gravelblade Gravelblade
I actually have multiple copies of this book, since Robinson Jeffers is my favorite California poet!
The photos are awesome, the editing and of course Jeffers' poetry, are all wonderful, and I cannot recommend "Stones of the Sur" too highly. If you have any interest in Robinson Jeffers and his poetry and/or his life, you
will thoroughly enjoy this wonderful volume!
Qucid Qucid
Morley Baer is up there with Adams, Weston, and Minor White. West Coast photography at its best. Reminds me of a private publication of "Tone Poems," but with a different bent. Jeffers offers his poetry in the book, where with "Tone Poems" a compact disc was played with poetry read for each page. Innovative, but not as satifying as Baer's photography. A must for all libraries.
Jox Jox
Exquisite photographs of a very special place accompanied by great poetry.
Rolorel Rolorel
Somber pictures with magnificent somber poetry. I would suggest this book to anyone who thinks. The poetry might seem over the top to the modern reader, but "up the long coast of the future," it will be prophetic.
Zeueli Zeueli
This book is the consummate bonding of two of California's great artists. The words of Jeffers and the photographs of Baer blend to form a book of unparralled beauty...this book gives the Big Sur in California a grace and elegance beyond description..Mr. Baer's photographs are infused with a quiet intensity....one can spend hours enjoying his vision...adding the words of Robinson Jeffers is pure brilliance; particularly since these two men were part of what defined the West Coast art movement in the 50's. Strongly recommend this book to anyone who loves the Big Sur, brilliant b&w photography and the poetry and prose of Jeffers.