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eBook Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture ePub

eBook Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture ePub

by Imogen Cunningham,Richard Lorenz

  • ISBN: 0821224379
  • Category: Photography and Video
  • Subcategory: Photo and Art
  • Author: Imogen Cunningham,Richard Lorenz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bulfinch Pr; First Edition edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 200
  • ePub book: 1998 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1352 kb
  • Other: mobi doc rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 586

Description

Richard Lorenz has written extensively on Imogen Cunningham's work since 1983, when he began his association with the Imogen Cunningham Trust, where he is currently one of its three trustees.

Richard Lorenz has written extensively on Imogen Cunningham's work since 1983, when he began his association with the Imogen Cunningham Trust, where he is currently one of its three trustees. Lorenz has curated numerous museum and gallery exhibitions of Cunningham's photographs in the United States, Europe and Asia. This book contains a lot of the great images which make Imogen Cunninham a master of photography. I will recommend this book to everyone.

Imogen Cunningham was one of photography's early pioneers, a Seattle-born virtuoso whose brilliant portraits and still lifes helped to establish the medium as an art form. This book collects the best of Cunningham's portrait work - over 200 images.

Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture Lorenz R Hachette Book Group 9780821227329 Имоген Канинхэм: Портретная живопись : Imogen Cunningham was one of photographys early pioneers, a Seattle-born virtuoso.

Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture This samples Cunningham's career, from 1906 to 1976, from age 23 to the year of her death.

Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture. Richard Lorenz is one of the foremost experts on Imogen Cunningham as well as the author of three previous books and eight exhibition catalogues on her work. This samples Cunningham's career, from 1906 to 1976, from age 23 to the year of her death. That artistic longevity, if nothing else, is worthy of note.

Cunningham was a member of the California-based Group f/64, known for its dedication to the sharp-focus rendition of simple subjects. Cunningham was born in Portland, Oregon to father Isaac Burns Cunningham and mother Susan Elizabeth Cunningham (née Johnson).

An overview of Imogen Cunningham's photographic portraits from 1906 through to her death in 1976. In an illustrated essay accompanying the images, Richard Lorenz discusses Cunningham's approach to portraiture, influences on her work and comparable work by other important photographers. Country of Publication.

Richard Lorenz is one of the foremost experts on Imogen Cunningham as well as the author of three previous books and eight exhibition catalogues on her work. From Booklist: Cunningham (1883^-1976) made portraits of some of the century's most interesting artists, actors, and writers. Her admirers have long waited, however, for a book adequately showcasing her range as a portraitist and reproducing some of the hundreds of less-familiar portraits in her archives.

Portraiture was Cunningham's first love and foremost specialty and her subjects, captured with stringent clarity and astuteness, include some of the century's best-known artists, photographers, writers and other notables. Ansel Adams, Man Ray, Frida Kahlo, Gertrude Stein, Spencer Tracy, Cary Grant, Somerset Maugham and Anna Freud were among the thousands of individuals she photographed throughout her career.

We have four Imogen Cunningham photographs on the 6th floor of the Allen Center. Imogen Cunningham: Portraiture, by Richard Lorenz. These are gelatin silver "Estate Prints," printed by her son Ron after her death. Taschen America, 2001. Little, Brown, and Company/Bullfinch Press, 1997. Imogen Cunningham: Flora, by Richard Lorenz. Little, Brown, and Company/Bullfinch Press, 2001.

Find the latest shows, biography, and artworks for sale by Imogen Cunningham. After studying photography in Germany, Cunningham opened a portrait studio in Seattle, producing soft-focus allegorical prints in the tradition of Pictorialism-a style of photography influenced by academic painting from the turn of the century-as well as portraiture.

A collection of the portrait photographs from the late photographer who helped establish photography as an art form

Comments

Dogrel Dogrel
The superb essay by Richard Lorenz explains the genesis of Ms. Cunningham's career, the influences on her work, how her styles developed, how she sought work, and the challenges that she faced as a person and as an artist. The essay is of such quality that it raises the overall value of the book. Two of Ms. Cunningham's weaknesses were tendencies to misuse shadow and to blur where clarity would have worked better. Many of the images in this book are marred by these routine flaws. On the other hand, there are enough rewarding works to make owning this volume a treat. You will probably find yourself strongly favoring a third of the images over the rest. If you are a fan of her nude work, I think you will find many of the portraits disappointing. I did like them better than the floral images she produced.
This book contains 208 duotone plates, 50 black and white images, and 13 color plates. All of the color plates looked a little peculiar. Something is off in the reproduction of them. It almost looked like an error in the color registration by the printer.
Ms. Cunningham's best efforts were generally of people in her family, or those she had great respect or affection for. When her connection to the person was modest, often the results were too. Generally, the more elaborate the composition, the better the result except when shadows were involved. For that reason, her outdoor portraits in full sun turned out best.
My favorite images in this book (as reproduced here) include:
My Father at Sixty, 1906; Mother and Child, Germany, 1909-1910; My Mother Peeling Apples, about 1910; The Dream, 1910; Roi Partridge, 1915; My Father, about 1918; Dane Coolidge, about 1921; Roger Sturtevant, about 1922; Sherwood Anderson, Writer 2, about 1923; Gertrude Gerrish, 1924; Henry Cowell, 1926; Portrait of Portia Hume, about 1930; Frances Dee, 1932; The Pareeckh Sisters from India, early 1930s; Robert Irwin, 1933; Alfred Stieglitz, 1934; Herbert Hoover 2, 1935; My Father at Ninety, 1936; Shen Yao, 1938; Edward Weston at Point Lobos 2, 1945; Woman in Sorrow, 1964; Brassai, 1973; Ansel Adams, Photographer 2, 1975; Morris Graves in His Leek Garden, 1972; Dr. Maria Kolisch, 1973; and Roi Patridge and Horse's Skull, 1975.
After you examine this book, I suggest that you think about what you want to learn and feel from a portrait. Do you want to know how the person liked to portray him or herself? Do you want to see a pawn within the photographer's style? Do you want to understand the person's personality? Then, go back and look at these images and think about what Ms. Cunningham has captured in each case.
As Mr. Lorenz says in his essay, even before a negative is retouched, "lighting manipulates and obfuscates reality," the "environmental context of the photograph modulates its connective power," and the "theatrics of makeup and costume alter fact and validate illusions." Where do you see these effects?
If you are like me, you will find the double exposure work interesting . . . capturing a sense of the fourth dimension of time. Many of the works will remind you of Marcel Duchamp's work, with which Ms. Cunningham was quite familiar.
Capture reality past the poser's projection . . . and add truth!
Qwne Qwne
Excellent artist. Her photographs in black and white are beautiful and surreal.