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eBook Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence) ePub

eBook Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence) ePub

by Ruth Nanda Anshen,Jonas Salk

  • ISBN: 0231053282
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Ruth Nanda Anshen,Jonas Salk
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr (March 1, 1983)
  • Pages: 127
  • ePub book: 1346 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1837 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 543

Description

Jonas Salk (1914-1995) is well regarded as the scientist who developed a vaccination for polio (1955) and founder of. .Salk's Anatomy of Reality would serve as a detailed introduction to systems theory as it was presented in its fundamental form.

Jonas Salk (1914-1995) is well regarded as the scientist who developed a vaccination for polio (1955) and founder of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. This text was commissioned by Ruth Nanda Anshen for her "Convergence" series. Salk's perspective focuses on systems theory, viewing nature and the cosmos as being based on dynamic binary relationships. He regularly calls our attention from the human to the cosmic perspective. He explains to us that "The most fundamental phenomenon in the universe is relationship.

Anatomy of Reality book. Number 5 in a series dedicated to those which mark a turning point in history.

Salk's Anatomy of Reality would serve as a detailed introduction to systems theory as it was presented in its fundamental form.

Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence) Format: Hardcover Authors: Jonas Salk ISBN10: 0231053282 Published: 1983-03-01 Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence). Columbia Univ Pr. Book Format.

Bibliographic Details  .

Bibliographic Details Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr. Publication Date: 1983. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books.

These principles are applied to the question of whether there is convergence or divergence in and by means of the Internet ) that the Internet is basically a social system and that it is a subsystem of the larger and overarching system of the whole society

These principles are applied to the question of whether there is convergence or divergence in and by means of the Internet ) that the Internet is basically a social system and that it is a subsystem of the larger and overarching system of the whole society. It will be shown how the Internet can be perceived as a possible trigger for societal developments bringing about fundamental change in the nature of society. Thus the article cuts across philosophical, system theoretical, social theoretical, sociology of technology, and information society theory considerations.

Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence)

Anatomy of Reality: Merging of Intuition and Reason (Convergence). Argues that humans can play an active role in their continuing evolution and considers the relationship between knowledge and life. 53282/?tag prabook0b-20. The Survival of the Wisest. The Survival of the Wisest Jan 01, 1973 Salk, Jonas). The Survival of the Wisest Jan 01, 1973 Salk, Jonas.

She was the author of several books including The Anatomy of Evil, Biography of An Idea, Morals Equals Manners and The Mystery of Consciousness: A Prescription for Human Survival. Anshen was born on June 14, 1900 in Lynn, Massachusetts to Jewish Russian immigrants. She studied at Boston University under Alfred North Whitehead.

Misterio y Pavor: Trece Cuentos EAN 9780030009969. Environment and population;: Problems and solutions EAN 9780030009815. Watts and Woodstock (Case studies in cultural anthropology) EAN 9780030009365. Insurance markets: Information problems and regulation EAN 9780030010194. Competitors and Comrades: Culture, Economics and Personality EAN 978003001. 69 руб. American Film and American Society Since 1945 (The Contemporary United States) EAN 9780333300213.

Argues that humans can play an active role in their continuing evolution and considers the relationship between knowledge and life

Comments

Qusserel Qusserel
This was a gift for a writer who is preparing a book in intuition and the personal as well as professional power of accessing one's intuitive mind. Jonas Salk was a brilliant example of one who accessed and followed the intuitive knowledge we all possess and did so for the benefit of all humankind. In this book he delves into the logical conclusion one arrives at when spending time with the infinite knowledge present in the depths of the subconscious mind, The conclusion that we are all part of a complex and interconnected biosphere and that every part of it depends on every other part. He makes that point that those who are able to access this well of knowledge and carry forth with what is learned have a moral obligation to humanity and to the planet to proceed with the tasks so clearly shown them. It may be easier to follow after first reading more about his life and methods. There is clearly a lifetime of learning woven into an incredible tapestry portraying these elusive ideas.
Whitesmasher Whitesmasher
This is a book of its time (1983), and it's interesting to read with the internet looming up behind it. Jonas Salk (1914-1995) is well regarded as the scientist who developed a vaccination for polio (1955) and founder of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. This text was commissioned by Ruth Nanda Anshen for her "Convergence" series. Salk's perspective focuses on systems theory, viewing nature and the cosmos as being based on dynamic binary relationships. He regularly calls our attention from the human to the cosmic perspective. And throughout he expounds his own evolutionary theory of human consciousness. Interestingly, he approaches our mental evolution by a kind of "New Thought" philosophy. That is, by the human mind's ability to become self-aware and self-altering, we are empowered to change ourselves, our culture, and the world's evolution itself. He claims this can only be done by "merging of intuition and reason." Rather than explain this merging, Salk's book is a call-to-arms for present and future generations to focus their attention on better understanding and developing the integration of intuition and reason [n.b. we still know relatively little]. His underlying thesis is that if we do not seek to develop an integration of intuitive-reasoning and reasoned-intuition, then humanity's future is doomed. My personal take away was largely his writings on his own intuitive perspective, which focus on imaginal projection, identity substitution, and invoking a multiplicity of outcomes for any given concern. In these writings are revealed some of the most thoughtful and incisive intuitive reflections by any scientist that I have ever read. Despite the technological advances and cultural changes since this work was written, this text remains a relevant and beautiful piece of writing--closer, at times, to a sermon than philosophy or exposition. Two of my favorite quotes (from the first 20 pages):

"When I became a scientist, I would picture myself as a virus, or as a cancer cell, for example, and try to sense what it would be like to be either. I would also imagine myself as the immune system, and I would try to reconstruct what I would do as an immune system engaged in combating a virus or cancer cell. When I had played through a series of such scenarios on a particular problem and had acquired new insights, I would design laboratory experiments accordingly. I soon found myself in a dialogue with nature using viruses, immune systems, and other phenomena to ask questions in the form of experiments and then waiting for the answer. Based upon the results of the experiment, I would then know what questions to ask next, until I learned what I wanted to know, or until I went as far as I could go" (7).

"My mind is occupied by shifting patterns and changing relationships as if I were observing through my mind’s eye the process of evolution and the related processes of metamorphosis. I am drawn and guided by feelings to move, to act, to observe, and to reflect on what all this means. I sense something strong and powerful that is acting with interior as well as exterior force. I feel it as I feel the wind although I cannot see it. My sail is full but I do not see what fills it. I am drawn toward toward certain people and in certain directions. Forces of attraction act upon me; they guide me as if I did not need a compass with which to verify my course. It is enough that I should yield and allow myself to follow what I feel.

This is mysterious. I cannot visually, with my physical eye, see the forces that act upon me from within and without and yet I cannot deny their existence. If I try, I suffer. If I surrender, allowing them to act upon me, and if I work with them, I feel exhilarated; I become filled with the joy of life” (16).
Thozius Thozius
The author doesn't really discuss the topic as "advertised" by his book's title & its subtitle. I expected a discussion on the human mechanism to create its own personal reality based on a person's perceptions of the external world. Instead he writes about evolution particularly that of the biosphere -- which is a nice discussion. He "dances" around merging intuition & reason, I guess because he has very foggy notions on how to do it. So he just dangles the topic in front of his readers. I concur wholeheartedly with Salk that morals & ethics is strictly & purely a human creation, that they have no basis in supernatural "things" or mental creations. It's just us humans down here, trying to live from day to day hopefully with some measure of meaningfulness. At least the book is very short. If Salk's book were a long one, I'm sure it would have been unbearably tedious & pedantic. But if one's never thought about the power of evolution & asked why or how come there's living things on this planet, this book would trigger some good thinking.
Oppebro Oppebro
Salk's Anatomy of Reality would serve as a detailed introduction to systems theory as it was presented in its fundamental form. He explains to us that "The most fundamental phenomenon in the universe is relationship." This in itself can be perplexing to many a reader, especialy those who have learned to see the world existing as separate objects which appear to him to compete with eachother. Salk tells us that there are no independant objects, instead "We must consider al events in terms of process." This process leads to integration and that in turn leads to wholeness. However the wholeness has properties that the constituent parts do not have. Salk goes further than, say, General Systems Theory, which has the same fundamental claims, in that he ascribes a fundamental importance to the binary process, revealing to us that all processes are a binary process integrated by relationships between the elements. This suggests that there is a fundamental process of existence, and if realized will constitute a principle or framework similar to the scientific theory of everything, but different in that Salks approach is not a particularized perspective.