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eBook Zen and Now: On the Trail of Robert Pirsig and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ePub

eBook Zen and Now: On the Trail of Robert Pirsig and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance ePub

by Buck Schirner,Mark Richardson

  • ISBN: 1423373588
  • Category: Philosophy
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Buck Schirner,Mark Richardson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (September 9, 2008)
  • ePub book: 1777 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1525 kb
  • Other: mobi doc docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 155

Description

Although Richardson is on the trail of Pirsig, this .

Although Richardson is on the trail of Pirsig, this book is as much about his own status in the universe and who he is as a father and a human being. It is charmingly written, honest to a fault and as unpretentious as Pirsig’s book was the opposite. Probably like everybody else who has bought this book I am a longtime fan of Robert Pirsig's classic book from 1974, so I was of course intrigued by Zen and Now and finally got around to reading it. Well, given the subject matter I expected to at least like this book, but I actually fell in love with it from the very first page.

Robert M. Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974) was the rare quest narrative in which two American . And in their wake came Mark Richardson, who writes about cars and motorcycles for The Toronto Star.

Devotees compiled a readers’ guide and organized an academic conference dedicated to Pirsig’s unifying idea, the Metaphysics of Quality

While Robert Pirsig was open in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, about his personal life and the effect it had on his loved ones, he spoke from a selfish state of detachment.

While Robert Pirsig was open in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, about his personal life and the effect it had on his loved ones, he spoke from a selfish state of detachment. Mark Richardson, through his interviews and letter exchanges with the Pirsig family (as well as others) exposes the price that Robert, Nancy, Ted and Chris paid to sustain Robert in his mighty quest

In 1968, Robert Pirsig and his eleven-year-old son, Chris, made the cross-country motorcycle trip that would become the inspiration for Pirsig’s book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, a powerful blend of personal narrative and philosophical investigation that has inspired generations.

A journalist recounts his odyssey retracing the cross-country motorcycle trip taken by Robert Pirsig and his son, Chris, that inspired the classic philosophical narrative "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Minnesota - Into North Dakota - Eastern North Dakota - South Dakota - Western North Dakota - Miles City, Montana - Central Montana - Wyoming - Western Montana - Bozeman, Saturday - Bozeman, Sunday - Into Idaho - Idaho - Eastern Oregon - Western Oregon - Into California. California - Pacific coast - San Francisco.

I love Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (ZMM). As an avid motorcyclist and fan of the book, I too someday hope to take a trip similar to Mark's. I learned a lot about ZMM's author Rober Pirsig in Mark's book

I love Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (ZMM). I learned a lot about ZMM's author Rober Pirsig in Mark's book. But, what I enjoyed the most was learning about the lives of the different characters in ZMM such as the Sutherland's and the DeWeeses. It's a quick and interesting story. It left me wanting more. Motorcycle travel with a twist of Zen. Published by Thriftbooks.

a book by Mark Richardson. Most long motorcycle journeys mark a turning point in one’s life, even if they don’t start out that way. In the summer of 1968, Robert Pirsig set out from Minneapolis, Minnesota bound for San Francisco via Montana. With him on his Honda 305 Super Hawk was his eleven-year-old son. Pirsig had worked as a college professor in Bozeman, Montana years before. I bought the book back then and have managed to struggle through it three times since.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Zen and Now: On the Trail . Fromthe back of his own motorcycle, Richardson investigates what happened to the reclusive Pirsig, his family, and the people described in the book in the years after its surprising success.

Fromthe back of his own motorcycle, Richardson investigates what happened to the reclusive Pirsig, his family, and the people described in the book in the years after its surprising success. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Home Robert M. Pirsig Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Home Robert M. Pirsig Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, . Phædrus, our narrator, takes a present-tense cross-country motorcycle trip with his son during which the maintenance of the motorcycle becomes an illustration of how we can unify the cold, rational realm of technology with the warm, imaginative realm of artistry. As in Zen, the trick is to become one with the activity, to engage in it fully, to see and appreciate all details - be it hiking in the woods, penning an essay, or tightening the chain on a motorcycle.

Welcome to the web site of Zen and Now, intended to provide some background and context to my book, Zen and Now - On the trail of Robert Pirsig .

Welcome to the web site of Zen and Now, intended to provide some background and context to my book, Zen and Now - On the trail of Robert Pirsig and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, published by Knopf. It's a book that tells of how I tuned up my old motorbike and became a "Pirsig Pilgrim," following the famous literary journey that Robert Pirsig and his son Chris took in 1968 from Minneapolis to San Francisco. Write to me at markndnow.

In 1968, Robert Pirsig and his eleven-year-old son, Chris, made the cross-country motorcycle trip that would become the inspiration for Pirsig’s book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, a powerful blend of personal narrative and philosophical investigation that has inspired generations. Among the millions of readers to fall under the book’s spell was Mark Richardson, who as a young man struggled to understand Pirsig’s provocative and elusive ideas. Rereading the book decades later, Richardson, now a journalist and father of two, was moved by its portrayal of Pirsig’s complex relationship with Chris and struck by the timelessness of its lessons. So he tuned up his old Suzuki dirt bike and became a “Pirsig pilgrim,” one of the legions of fans who retrace the Pirsigs’ route from Minneapolis to San Francisco. In following this itinerary over the lonely byways of the American West, Richardson revisits the people and places from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, pondering the meaning of Pirsig’s philosophy and the answers it may offer to the questions in his own life. Richardson’s dogged reporting also gives new insight into the reclusive writer’s life, exploring Pirsig’s struggle with mental illness, his unwanted celebrity, and the tragic, brutal murder of Chris in 1979. Published to coincide with the fortieth anniversary of Pirsig’s original trip, Zen and Now is a stirring meditation on a classic work and a passionate inquiry into the lessons it continues to teach us in the complex and bewildering world we inhabit today.

Comments

Rarranere Rarranere
Pirsig mentions at the beginning of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance that the book "should in no way be associated with that great body of factual information relating to orthodox Zen Buddhist practice." I take that statement to mean that there is no overt discussion about Zen in the novel, which is true. However, it can be argued that the novel is full of Zen -- it's just not overtly discuessed. I bought Richardson's book hoping that he might have something to say on that subject, but he seems to think that Pirsig writes about his motorcycle trip mainly to talk about motorcycles and his mental breakdown which, I'm convinced, isn't the whole story. And I'm left with the impression that Richcardson doesn't really get the most subtle aspects of Pirsig's novel.
Dranar Dranar
Probably like everybody else who has bought this book I am a longtime fan of Robert Pirsig's classic book from 1974, so I was of course intrigued by Zen and Now and finally got around to reading it. Well, given the subject matter I expected to at least like this book, but I actually fell in love with it from the very first page. It's a GREAT "road book", and the writing is superb. The author employs a similar method as Pirsig did, weaving a present-tense travel narrative with biographical reflections ( and updates!) on Pirig's life story. Both are fascinating. This book could have been entitled Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Travel. For one thing, the author is crossing half the country NOT on a decked-out Honda Goldwing or a BMW or a Harley but on a 600cc single-cylinder dirt bike! That alone makes this an adventure worth reading about. Pirsig did his trip on a 305cc Honda, with his son on board no less. This was back in the days before motorcycles had evolved into two-wheeled cars. There is little of interest to me these days in modern motorcycle "touring", given the size and luxury of these things they are driving. But Mark Richardson rode a simple out-in-the-wind ( and rain!) honest-to-God motorcycle to really "feel out" the terrain Pirsig traveled in 1968 and made famous in his book. Richardson's is a heartfelt pilgrimage and a wonderful trip and read. Now that I've read this book I think it might be time to revisit the original, for the first time in about 20 years.
Mbon Mbon
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is one of my favorite books. So, naturally, I was drawn to Richardson's work. I read this book over the course of a few days... it is good enough to keep me coming back to finish it.

Richardson's retracing of the Zen ride makes me want to go repeat the journey as well. The fact that he met a number of the people who were characters in the original book adds quite a lot of interest to the story. I enjoyed the stories of those interactions greatly.

If you enjoyed Pirsig's work, Richardson's is worth a shot. It's not the same as the original and is not intended to be. But the insight of another motorcyclist retracing Pirsig's path is interesting. Enjoy!
Aiata Aiata
While there was so much to learn from the classic work Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, my favorite parts of the book related to the story of the road trip that took place in July 1968. This book retraces that trip, informs the reader with facts about the Pirsig family and was a very enjoyable read.
Vobei Vobei
If of love ZAMA, this is for you. I have read ZAMA 20 times in the past 40 years or so and this "story behind the story" is a fascinating read.
Grotilar Grotilar
Loved this book .. Carried me back to my 3 readings of ZAMM (yep ...just like the author ... took me 3 tries to get thru the original).
My only criticisms are two >> 1) No mention of the teaching method of "Chautauqua lectures" .. Which was the technique Pirsig used throughout the original book ... And 2) No discussion of "Gumption Traps" .. My favorite lecture of the entire ZAMM ... !!!
OTANO OTANO
Excellent
A good attempt to providing more background to Pirsig's trip and book. The interviews are worth the price of the book. Thanks!