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eBook Outlaw Sea: Chaos and Crime on the World's Oceans ePub

eBook Outlaw Sea: Chaos and Crime on the World's Oceans ePub

by William Langewiesche

  • ISBN: 1862077312
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: William Langewiesche
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books (February 7, 2005)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1670 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1387 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 478

Description

Maps on lining papers. An ocean world - The wave makers - To the ramparts - On a captive sea - The ocean's way - On the beach

Maps on lining papers. An ocean world - The wave makers - To the ramparts - On a captive sea - The ocean's way - On the beach. Explores the ocean world and the enterprises-licit and illicit-that flourish in the privacy afforded by its horizons. forty-three thousand ships ply the open ocean. Here is free enterprise at its freest.

For Langewiesche, the ocean is still a frontier, a lawless domain where brute economics always trumps moral . The author shows us just how wild and little-observed the seas of the world really are, even in the modern age of satellites and surveillance planes

For Langewiesche, the ocean is still a frontier, a lawless domain where brute economics always trumps moral considerations. His overview ranges from a story of contemporary piracy off the coast of Indonesia to a portrait of the ship-breaking yards of India, where workers die by the dozen. The author shows us just how wild and little-observed the seas of the world really are, even in the modern age of satellites and surveillance planes. He spends a bit too much of the book on one tragic accident when I'd have liked more detail about the big picture of ocean commerce and crime, but that is my preference.

William Langewiesche vividly reports on the unforgiving & brutal forces, both natural and manmade to which those who take to the sea are exposed.

With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world . The ocean is our world, he reminds us, and it is wild.

With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world and the enterpriseslicit and illicitthat flourish in the privacy afforded by its horizons. Forty-three thousand gargantuan ships ply the open ocean, carrying nearly all the raw materials and products on which our lives are built. Many are owned or managed by one-ship companies so ghostly that they exist only on paper. This is the outlaw seaperennially defiant and untamablethat Langewiesche brings startlingly into view. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail.

William Langewiesche's The Outlaw Sea is quite an eye-opener for a land lubber like Nicholas Lezard. In an increasingly regimented world, the seas remain an outpost of anarchy. Ships fly under flags of convenience which offer no clue as to the true whereabouts of the owners; they are crewed by the cheapest labour. Of the Kristal, a ship carrying molasses which sank in the Atlantic in 2001, William Langewiesche writes: "There is little risk to the principals involved - the customers and shipping companies - because the hulls and cargoes are insured, and in the event of an accident and a spill, molasses disperses easily and disappears without a trace.

With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world and . The oceans way. 127. On the beach. William Langewiesche is the author of four previous books, Cutting for Sign, Sahara Unveiled, Inside the Sky, and American Ground

With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world and the enterprises-licit and illicit-that flourish in the privacy afforded by its horizons. 197. Авторские права. William Langewiesche is the author of four previous books, Cutting for Sign, Sahara Unveiled, Inside the Sky, and American Ground. He is a correspondent for The Atlantic Monthly, where The Outlaw Sea originated. Библиографические данные.

The Outlaw Sea: A World of Freedom, Chaos, and Crime. by William Langewiesche. With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world and the enterprises-licit and illicit-that flourish in the privacy afforded by its horizons

The Outlaw Sea: A World of Freedom, Chaos, and Crime. With typically understated lyricism, William Langewiesche explores this ocean world and the enterprises-licit and illicit-that flourish in the privacy afforded by its horizons. But its efficiencies are accompanied by global problems-shipwrecks and pollution, the hard lives and deaths of the crews of the gargantuan ships, and the growth of two pathogens: a modern and sophisticated strain of piracy and its close cousin, the maritime form of the new stateless terrorism. This is the outlaw sea that Langewiesche brings startlingly into view.

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William Langewiesche (pronounced:long-gah-vee-shuh) (born June 12, 1955) is an American author and journalist who was also a professional airplane pilot for many years

William Langewiesche (pronounced:long-gah-vee-shuh) (born June 12, 1955) is an American author and journalist who was also a professional airplane pilot for many years. Since 2006 he has been the international correspondent for Vanity Fair magazine and in 2019 was named a writer-at-large for the New York Times Magazine. William Langewiesche is currently the international correspondent for the magazine Vanity Fair, a position he has held since 2006

William Langewiesche. Three quarters of the world is made up of ocean; vast, untamed expanses of water, impossible to police rigorously.

William Langewiesche. For travellers by sea there is an ever-present danger of shipwreck, the age-old problem of piracy, and now an alarming new threat of terrorism. Forty-three thousand gargantuan ships navigate their way across the oceans, carrying nearly all the raw material and products on which our lives depend. Out at sea, ships become tiny islands, with their own distinct and isolated rules. Many are owned or managed by companies so ghostly that they only exist on paper.

Exploring the political force fo the world's oceans, from piracy to terrorism. Three quarters of the world is made up of ocean. Vast, untamed expances of water, impossible to police rigorously. William Langewiesche vividly reports on the unforgiving & brutal forces, both natural and manmade to which those who take to the sea are exposed.

Comments

Ieslyaenn Ieslyaenn
A fascinating and important book. We all know about Somali pirates, but did you know that old-fashioned pirates with big ships still operate on the high seas? I certainly didn't. Nor did I realize the once-proud profession of "sailor" has become dominated by poorly paid hands who rarely if ever get the traditional perk of shore leave and often can't even speak a common language.
The author shows us just how wild and little-observed the seas of the world really are, even in the modern age of satellites and surveillance planes. He spends a bit too much of the book on one tragic accident when I'd have liked more detail about the big picture of ocean commerce and crime, but that is my preference. The sea sagas here are gripping, and there's a lot of important information for everyone concerned about the seas and those who travel on them.
- Matt Bille, author, The First Space Race (TAMU, 2004)
Onetarieva Onetarieva
Langewiesche's descriptions of ships sinking at sea are compelling, despite drifting more than occasionally toward the melodramatic. People fighting for survival are either Hobbesian brutes or noble savages.

Other than that, the book is simplistic and a bit dated. The agenda, if there is one, also comes across as convoluted. Topics undertaken are, among others, anarchy at sea, pollution and labor in shipbreaking, the potential for terrorism at sea, piracy, and regulatory inadequacy. This is too scattered for such a short book. And unfortunately none is subjected to real analysis; it's all anecdotal. There are also no notes.

This book teaches the reader very little that is real or important about the shipping industry, focusing instead on the rare and the eye-catching.
Zargelynd Zargelynd
The author is a journalist, and journalists are taught to keep the reader's attention by emphasizing individual stories and human interest over statistics, which are supposedly boring. Consequently, this book is a collection of stories. We get to spend time with both pirates and their victims in the Indian Ocean, with the crews of sinking, leaky oil tankers, with the investigators of the sinking of an Estonian ferry, and with shipbreakers on India's Alang beach.

The stories are great, but they only paint details and leave the reader hungry for the broad picture. There are few figures. We read, for example, that there are over 40,000 large ships on the ocean, but there is no indication of where this estimate comes from. If the ocean is chaos, how do we know how many ships are on it? Also, what does "large" mean? I would have been interested in a table of number of ships by size category, with the source of the data and the author's assessment of their accuracy. We also hear that most ships sail under flags of convenience. Here also, a table of how many ships fly each flag would have given some perspective.

The same pattern is repeated throughout the book. All the issues are presented through anecdotes, without quantification. For example, we know there is piracy, but not how prevalent it is. At the end of the book, we don't know whether the stories are examples of trends with broad significance or are simply random isolated cases.

The book is also lacking in cross-referencing information. There is only a table of contents with cryptic titles like "The wave makers" and no index. The only maps are in the lining of the cover, and there are no photographs, which leaves too much to the imagination.
Dugor Dugor
While the cover blurbs on the book promise another "Prefect Storm" quality reading experience, it's a fine read, but it's not quite that good. The book is broken up into 3 sections, a pirate hijacking in the Asian seas, the Estonia ferry sinking in heavy seas, and the ship breaking beach at Alang, India. The pirate section is great. The ferry sinking less so because in explaining the political fallout, he goes over the same information multiple times. (Though I was shocked at the statistic he threw out that supposedly 20% of all Germans believe that the 9/11 World Trade Center attack was actually done by the United States against its own people.) The 3rd section about the ship breaking industry was the reason I'd picked up the book, but it spends most its space on the Greenpeace efforts to shut down Alang. The author admires Greenpeace more than I do. When during an interview with Greenpeace, he keeps asking what I think is a very interesting question and the Greenpeace representative keeps refusing to answer it, the author says that it's really his fault for asking the wrong question. And since the ship breaking section of the book is over 10 years old (even 5 years old when the book was published in 2004), it leaves the question unanswered about what happened with the whole Greenpeace movement to shut down Alang because I believe ships are still being broken down there, that they have not shut down.
Rude Rude
Very well written. Really enjoyed it.
Bad Sunny Bad Sunny
Having read Langewiesche's account for the Atlantic of the massive cleanup effort at Ground Zero, I was impressed enough by his journalistic talent to give this book a try and was not disappointed. He writes about a subject that it is worthwhile for everyone to understand and know something about.
Umor Umor
Wm. Langewiesche is a favorite author of mine, having produced several previous delicious reading experiences for me, most recently his book about the Sahara. He is a skillful wordsmith and travel raconteur with an eye for detail almost as keen as Paul Theroux's. So I leapt at the chance to read The Outlaw Sea, thinking it would help explain the piracy issue in great detail. (How is it the world's strongest navies can't stop a few Somalis in outboards from highjacking yachts in 2008?) Instead, while devoting a chapter on South China sea pirates, he devotes two very lengthy chapters on the Baltic Sea ferry disaster that was so regrettable but presented by the author in such detail one leaves the book thinking he has seen every rivet and chain link of the Estonia, the ship that sunk--this book. I'll continue to seek out Mr. Langewiesche's work, but with skepticism and a little less enthusiasm.