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eBook Dublin's American Policy: Irish-America Diplomatic Relations, 1945-1952 ePub

eBook Dublin's American Policy: Irish-America Diplomatic Relations, 1945-1952 ePub

by Troy Davis

  • ISBN: 0813209072
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Troy Davis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Catholic University of America Press (October 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 232
  • ePub book: 1491 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1287 kb
  • Other: txt docx mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 822

Description

Davis reveals that, in its formulation of diplomatic policy, the Irish government was hamstrung by domestic political considerations.

Davis reveals that, in its formulation of diplomatic policy, the Irish government was hamstrung by domestic political considerations. Most notably, during the 1948 to 1951 period, electoral pressures moved the Irish coalition ministry to follow a policy of virulent but ultimately counterproductive anti-partitionism. The Irish government pursued the chimerical goal of convincing the United States to pressure the British into uniting Ireland, regardless of the wishes of the Northern majority

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Davis, Troy D. Dublin's American Policy: Irish-American Diplomatic Relations, 1945-1952 (Catholic University of Amer Press, 1998). Finnegan, Richard B. "Irish–American Relations. in by William J. Crotty and David Schmitt, eds. Ireland on the World Stage (2002): 95-110. Geiger, Till, and Michael Kennedy, eds.

Dublin's American Policy : Irish-American Diplomatic Relations, 1945-1952. Publisher:Catholic University of America Press. Select Format: Paperback. 60 lbs. Dimensions:0. You Might Also Enjoy.

Dublin, 1991); Davis, Troy, Dublin’s American policy: Irish American diplomatic relations, 1945–1952 (Washington, .

5 See, for example, McCabe, Ian, A diplomatic history of Ireland, 1948–49: the Republic, the Commonwealth and NATO (Dublin, 1991); Davis, Troy, Dublin’s American policy: Irish American diplomatic relations, 1945–1952 (Washington, . 7 Steury, Donald, ‘The OSS and Project Safehaven’ in Studies in Intelligence, ix (2000), p. 36. 8 Lorenz-Meyer, ‘To avert a fourth Reich’, pp 28, 35–6. Ireland, Europe and the Marshall Plan (Four Courts PressLtd, 2004). The United States, Irish Americans and the Northern Ireland Peace Process," International Affairs (1996) 72 pp: 521-36.

Dublin's American Policy" uses the methods of the diplomatic historian to examine how the relationship between these . Davis, Troy Dwayne, "Dublin's American policy: Irish-American diplomatic relations, 1945-1952" (1992).

Dublin's American Policy" uses the methods of the diplomatic historian to examine how the relationship between these two very dissimilar nations, during the seven years immediately following World War II, affected the subsequent history of the smaller country.

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As the Second World War came to an end in 1945, Ireland and the United States were in antipodal political positions. Ireland was a small country and relatively insignificant in international affairs. As the Second World War came to an end in 1945, Ireland and the United States were in antipodal political positions

Partition and Neutrality (Dublin: Anvil Books, 1986); Troy . avis, Dublin’s American Policy: Irish-. American Diplomatic Relations, 1945-1952 (Washington: CUA Press, 1998). Ireland and the US in the 1950s.

Partition and Neutrality (Dublin: Anvil Books, 1986); Troy . and not very popular ones, in a strange post-war world. 7 Irish applications were consistently, perhaps understandably, vetoed by the Soviets until 1955, especially when it is considered. that Dublin only opened bilateral diplomatic relations with the USSR in 1972. The dawning of a new era of multilateral relations began for Ireland when it was. finally allowed to join the UN in the mid-1950s.

A comprehensive and informed analysis of Irish-American relations in the early Cold War years. As the Second World War came to an end in 1945, few countries had less in common-in terms of geopolitical power-than Ireland and the United States. In this informative narrative history, Troy D. Davis examines the diplomatic relationship between the two nations during the seven years immediately following the war. He assesses the effect of that relationship on the subsequent history of Ireland and emphasizes the impact of Ireland's early Cold War policies on partition-the most intractable of twentieth-century Irish problems. Benefiting from extensive archival research in Ireland, the United States, and Great Britain, the book provides a behind-the-scenes look at such topics as Ireland's unsuccessful application for U.N. membership in 1946; Irish participation in the Marshall Plan; and Ireland's 1949 decision not to join NATO. Davis reveals that, in its formulation of diplomatic policy, the Irish government was hamstrung by domestic political considerations. Most notably, during the 1948 to 1951 period, electoral pressures moved the Irish coalition ministry to follow a policy of virulent but ultimately counterproductive anti-partitionism. The Irish government pursued the chimerical goal of convincing the United States to pressure the British into uniting Ireland, regardless of the wishes of the Northern majority. Davis argues that, given the importance of the United States' alliance with Great Britain, this Irish plan was extremely unrealistic. Consequently, it failed to advance Irish national interests and served instead to further entrench the border between North and South. The book will serve as a useful guide to those seeking a better understanding of the contemporary controversy over Irish partition. Students of twentieth-century Irish history, American diplomatic history, and Cold War history will also find this book of particular interest. Troy D. Davis is Professor of History and Chair of the History Department at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. "This book does several things that no other book does. Though bits of the 'story' are told in a variety of other works, this volume pulls everything together, and does not sacrifice detail in the process. I think it is easily the strongest book in the field . . . the book that historians will favor."-Prof. Francis M. Carroll, University of Manitoba