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eBook The Great Art of Government: Locke's Use of Consent ePub

eBook The Great Art of Government: Locke's Use of Consent ePub

by Peter Josephson

  • ISBN: 070061169X
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Peter Josephson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas (June 14, 2002)
  • Pages: 376
  • ePub book: 1803 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1713 kb
  • Other: mobi azw lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 659

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Peter Josephson now takes a close look at Locke's writings on both consent and the art of That government should be rooted in the consent of the governed may be the most accepted aspect of John Locke's liberal theory.

Peter Josephson now takes a close look at Locke's writings on both consent and the art of That government should be rooted in the consent of the governed may be the most accepted aspect of John Locke's liberal theory. Yet to this day Lockeans have reached no consensus over what constitutes consent or whether Locke even intended consent to be a standard of legitimacy. Peter Josephson now takes a close look at Locke's writings on both consent and the art of governance to show how each informs the other.

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Tacit Concept of Consent in Locke's Two Treatises of Government: A Note on Citizens, Travellers, and Patriarchalism. Use of this site is subject to terms & conditions. Iain W. Hampsher-Monk - 1979 - Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (1):135. John Locke's Contractarian Theory of Political Obligation. Yoen-kyo Jung - 1992 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester. John Locke's Critique of the Bible in the "First Treatise of Government". All rights reserved by The PhilPapers Foundation. Page generated Fri Nov 8 00:22:52 2019 on pp1.

The Great Art of Government. Locke's Use of Consent. Peter Josephson takes a close look at Locke's writings on both consent and the art of governance to show how each informs the other. Moving beyond previous scholarship, he gives us a Locke as much concerned with the effective functioning of government as with the roots of its moral legitimacy. A work of impressive originality and insight. Peter C. Myers, author of Our Only Star and Compass: Locke and the Struggle for Political Rationality.

Josephson is the author of The Great Art of Government: Locke's Use of Consent, co-author with R. Ward Holder of The Irony of Barack Obama: Reinhold Niebuhr, Barack Obama, and the Problem of Christian Statecraft, as well as works on politics and popular culture, and the writings. Ward Holder of The Irony of Barack Obama: Reinhold Niebuhr, Barack Obama, and the Problem of Christian Statecraft, as well as works on politics and popular culture, and the writings of Henry Kissinger. The American Election 2012: Contexts and Consequences more. The Irony of Barack Obama: Barack Obama, Reinhold.

The great art of government : Locke’s use of consent, Peter Josephson. (Applications of political theory).

I authored The Great Art of Government: Locke's Use of Consent, and co-authored The Irony of Barack Obama: Barack Obama, Reinhold Niebuhr, and the Problem of Christian Statecraft. I've also produced articles and chapters on politics and popular culture, justice and war, nineteenth century Russian thought, the political philosophy of Henry Kissinger, and the religious and philosophic influences on Barack Obama.

Locke's use of consent. Published 2002 by University Press of Kansas in Lawrence The founding and political society. Representation and the legislative power. The great art of government. Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-357) and index.

Peter Josephson is Professor and Chair in the Department of Politics at Saint Anselm College

Peter Josephson is Professor and Chair in the Department of Politics at Saint Anselm College. From 2012 to 2015 he held the Richard L. Bready Chair in Ethics, Economics, and the Common Good. He teaches in the Politics, Humanities, and Philosophy departments. Josephson is the author of The Great Art of Government: Locke's Use of Consent, co-author with R.

Two Treatises of Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke

Two Treatises of Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise attacks patriarchalism in the form of refutation of Robert Filmer's Patriarcha, while the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for a more civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. This publication contrasts former political works by Locke himself.

That government should be rooted in the consent of the governed may be the most accepted aspect of John Locke's liberal theory. Yet to this day Lockeans have reached no consensus over what constitutes consent or whether Locke even intended consent to be a standard of legitimacy.Peter Josephson now takes a close look at Locke's writings on both consent and the art of governance to show how each informs the other. Moving beyond previous scholarship, he gives us a Locke as much concerned with the effective functioning of government as with the roots of its moral legitimacy.According to Josephson, if we wish to understand "the great art of government," as one of the founders of modern liberalism presents it, we must examine the principle and practice of consent in Locke's political scheme. In examining the foundation of Locke's political theory, Josephson explores ways in which Locke's government by consent can coexist with the preservation of the law of nature or reason. As Josephson shows, Locke argues that reasonable customs can bridge the divide between the will of the people and the rule of reason.Josephson's work makes important new contributions to understanding Lockean thought. In particular, he shows how Locke joins normative theory with a practical concern for the art of effective government. He also argues that Lockean liberalism is not neutral with regard to conceptions of virtue, character, or the good life: indeed, the liberal regime requires virtues of toleration, civility, and industriousness in order to succeed and must teach its subjects those virtues in order to preserve that regime.While others have variously branded Locke's philosophy as majoritarian, aristocratic, or monarchist, Josephson cuts through these disputes to present a previously unrevealed Locke. His meticulous study pays keen attention to the details of Locke's works, while reconciling many of the disparate and often confusing features of Lockean thought. In sum, it offers serious readers a richer, deeper, and more nuanced understanding of this formative thinker and the liberalism he inspired.