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eBook Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable (Encounter Broadsides) ePub

eBook Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable (Encounter Broadsides) ePub

by Richard A. Epstein

  • ISBN: 1594036268
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Richard A. Epstein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Encounter Books; 5930th edition (November 29, 2011)
  • Pages: 64
  • ePub book: 1118 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1271 kb
  • Other: docx azw lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 132

Description

There is actually very little as to "why" progressive institutions are unsustainable, which is mainly an economic claim in a book that contains little data.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). There is actually very little as to "why" progressive institutions are unsustainable, which is mainly an economic claim in a book that contains little data.

Epstein's little book is interesting. There are some appealing bits and pieces However, the r Epstein's brief but complex addition to the Encounter Broadside series is a wonderful examination of the shortfalls and failings of the progressive. There are some appealing bits and pieces. Some of what he says is important and should be the starting point for discussion. But in the end he is mostly advocating that the government get entirely out of the business of ensuring that the very powerful do not exploit those beneath them. However, the r Epstein's brief but complex addition to the Encounter Broadside series is a wonderful examination of the shortfalls and failings of the progressive agenda, most especially regarding economics (hence the title's "Unsustainable" inclusion) and the financial lacking of progressive thinking.

Encounter Broadsides. His next book, Design for Liberty: Private Property, Public Administration, and the Rule of Law, was published in October 2011 by Harvard University Press. Richard A. Epstein is the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at New York University, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, and the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law Emeritus and senior lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School.

Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable. The painful performance of the American economy in the past decade is not a function of bad luck. It is the product of flawed institutional design. This combination of public finance and market regulation has proved a potent force for disaster. High marginal tax rates expose the political system to strong factional strife that.

institutions using Bookshelf across 241 countries. Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable by Richard A. Epstein and Publisher Encounter Books. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781594036279, 1594036276. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781594036262, 1594036268.

To these multiple ailments, Epstein argues that the best recipe is a reinvigoration of free markets that do not upset . Books related to Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable. Imprint: Encounter Books.

To these multiple ailments, Epstein argues that the best recipe is a reinvigoration of free markets that do not upset voluntary arrangements on the supposed grounds that they are unfair, one-sided or exploitive. Just change these two levers, and we can find an effective classical liberal antidote to excesses of the modern progressive age. About this book.

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Richard A. Tisch Professor of Law at New York University, a senior fellow at the . In this Broadside, James Piereson explains the progressive case is based upon a serious fallacy: it assumes that the government is actually capable of redistributing income from the wealthy to the poor.

Why Progressive Institutions are Unsustainable (Encounter Broadsides). by Richard A. Epstein. ISBN 9781594036262 (978-1-59403-626-2) Softcover, Encounter Books, 2011.

Город: New York, Chicago, Palo AltoПодписчиков: 13 ты. себе: Tisch Professor of Law NYU Bedford Senio. себе: Tisch Professor of Law NYU Bedford Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution Senior Lecturer, University of Chicago Law School

The painful performance of the American economy in the past decade is not a function of bad luck. It is the product of flawed institutional design. Right now we are reaping the harvest of efforts to reinvigorate the progressive programs of the New Deal that stress high progressive taxes, large transfer payments, strong labor laws, and major barriers to free trade.This combination of public finance and market regulation has proved a potent force for disaster.High marginal tax rates expose the political system to strong factional strife that stifles initiative, adds uncertainty and reduces overall revenues. To these multiple ailments, Epstein argues that the best recipe is a return to the flat tax of the classical liberal tradition. The government has committed itself to substituting state mandates for voluntary arrangements in labor and real estate markets, disabling both by retarding job formation and roiling real estate markets. To these multiple ailments, Epstein argues that the best recipe is a reinvigoration of free markets that do not upset voluntary arrangements on the supposed grounds that they are unfair, one-sided or exploitive.Just change these two levers, and we can find an effective classical liberal antidote to excesses of the modern progressive age.

Comments

LivingCross LivingCross
Thus far in the twenty-first century the United States has seen stagnation in its economy, and Richard Epstein correctly asserts that our fate has not been due to bad luck, but bad policies. In "Why Progressive Institutions Are Unsustainable," Epstein critiques the policies that have brought us our current malaise.

Epstein contrasts the classical liberalism (referred to today as conservatism or libertarianism) that elevated the United States from infant nation in the late eighteenth century to leading world power a mere century and a half later with the progressive policies that came into vogue during the twentieth century and that lead to stagnation and decline whenever and wherever they are tried.

Property rights, freedom of contract, and open competition in free markets are some of the chief tenets of classical liberalism. Epstein explains that these pro-growth policies have to be defended constantly from rent-seekers and other factions, and how since the Great Depression free markets and pro-growth policies have not been defended vigorously enough but have instead eroded, with negative results for the economy and for society.

Epstein provides concrete advantages of classical liberalism and the concomitant disadvantages of progressivism, and explains the difference between constitutionally legitimate and illegitimate uses of taxation and government spending.

"Why Progressive Institutions Are Unsustainable" concentrates on economics, but astute readers will be able to realize how the ideas Epstein advances in this booklet that can be read in an hour also apply to certain areas in social issues and foreign policy.
Uscavel Uscavel
...But won't. Sometimes it taskes a clear head, not pulled heart-strings to design public policy.

Dr Epstein brilliantly describes why so called progressive policies typically hurt the very people they are intended to help (well they are really intended to help the politicians not the poor, but that's a different conversation.

It's a "broadside" not a tome, which means it gives the high level argument, not the gory statistical analysis. Even so, the arguments are so lucid and clear that they are extremely difficult to ignore.
Hawk Flying Hawk Flying
If you liked Milton Friedman, you will like Richard Epstein too. In this book, he illustrates why, for all their good intentions, progressive liberal institutions simply cannot endure. They rack up huge debts until they collapse under their own weight.
Vetalol Vetalol
Small book but very good.
Vetibert Vetibert
You can read this is a snap. It's only 60 pages and written briskly so you can zip right through it. It is an effective argument as long as you are content with its focus on principles and generalities. It is not a data-driven argument. Also, as I complained about in regard to another of his books "How Progressives Rewrite the Constitution", the title of this book is again misleading. There is actually very little as to "why" progressive institutions are unsustainable, which is mainly an economic claim in a book that contains little data. The argument is there but it occupies only a couple of pages (incentives matter and progressive policies diminish them to the point that the overall pie shrinks, necessitating more tax-and-transfer policies, which only reinforce the disincentives and a downward economic spiral ensues, although such policies concededly create a floor of sorts so that the ultimate equilibrium is not a crash but a massive stagnation well below the economy's full productive capability: see most of Western Europe). But it's something you will blow by if you aren't looking for it: "Oh, right, this is what the title of the book means to refer to". And of course it's not accompanied by a lot of data (compare Edmund Phelps' recent book for a better-supported, albeit longer, version of the argument). I haven't read his recent book on Classical Liberalism and perhaps he puts more in there, this book being more of a pamphlet or speech than a full-fledged book.
Gldasiy Gldasiy
The fundamental flaw in our modern life is that society has been superseded and smothered by the State. The State is of our own making. Books like this provide a small glimmer of hope - if only people will listen and change their values, and be willing to pay the hard consequences now or suffer unimaginable pain later.
Sat Sat
Prompt delivery, nice goods. Thanks.
If you want to learn the perspective of a conservative/libertarian leaning political organization the broadside encounter books are a wonderful opportunity to explore topics in an essay format. They are interesting and well worth the read.