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eBook The 72 Year Cycle: Dawn of a New Republican Era ePub

eBook The 72 Year Cycle: Dawn of a New Republican Era ePub

by Brian E Johnson

  • ISBN: 1475287364
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Brian E Johnson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 5, 2012)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1961 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1248 kb
  • Other: rtf mobi lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 820

Description

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Details (if other): Cancel. The 72 Year Cycle: Dawn of a New Republican Era. by. Brian E. Johnson. Book by Johnson, Brian E. Get A Copy.

Although one will not learn this in a typical history class, there is an incredibly consistent 72-year and 36-year cycle in American history. Every 72 years one political party overwhelmingly controls national politics and is then replaced by another party in the 72nd year. It is an amazingly consistent historical pattern. And it doesn't take a P. to grasp it. With a few graphs and a few reminders of .

A History of Christianity is a 1976 study of the history of Christianity by the British historian Paul Johnson. The author aims to present a comprehensive factual history of the Christian religion.

Boris Johnson has promised to deliver Brexit and repay the trust of voters after he led the Conservatives to an "historic" general . In his victory speech earlier, he told activists the election result represented a "new dawn" for the country

Boris Johnson has promised to deliver Brexit and repay the trust of voters after he led the Conservatives to an "historic" general election win. The PM, who has met the Queen to ask to form a new government, has a majority of 80 in the House of Commons - the party's largest since 1987. He said he would work "flat out" and lead a "people's government". In his victory speech earlier, he told activists the election result represented a "new dawn" for the country. He thanked Labour voters, many of whom, he said, had backed the Conservatives for the first time, vowing to fulfil the "sacred trust" placed in him. Media playback is unsupported on your device.

His area of specialty has been the Early Republic.

For instructors looking for a short book covering a specific era of American History such as the Early Republic, this is a good choice. Paul E. Johnson is a professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina. His area of specialty has been the Early Republic. This book is a condensation of that specialty.

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By year’s end, more than 50 of the world’s largest companies were participating in RE 100, a global business initiative in which companies commit to getting100 % of their electricity from renewable sources. 1 a situation in which there is a lot of sudden change, confusion, disagreement 2 a new or difficult task that tests somebody’s ability and skill 3 a time when a particular situation makes it possible to do or to achieve something 4 the act of using energy, food or materials, the amount used 5 the production of something, especially electricity, heat.

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In the year that would follow, Brian came to experience the ultimate power o. .

Now in his mid-thirties and believing himself free, Brian had a vision for worship in the church, built a successful music label with his wife, and written award-winning songs and albums. In the year that would follow, Brian came to experience the ultimate power of surrendering the panic and chaos to God.

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Although one will not learn this in a typical history class, there is an incredibly consistent 72-year and 36-year cycle in American history. Every 72 years one political party overwhelmingly controls national politics and is then replaced by another party in the 72nd year. It is an amazingly consistent historical pattern. And it doesn’t take a Ph.D. to grasp it. With a few graphs and a few reminders of U.S. history, nearly all Americans will recognize these 72-year transition elections of the past. Three of America’s most famous Presidents ushered in these new 72-year eras - George Washington (in 1788), Abraham Lincoln (in 1860), and FDR (in 1932). Each of these elections ushered in dramatic political change and a 72-year era that was overwhelmingly dominated by one political party. Of course, the details are a little more complicated. But, in short, all the significant changes of political party balance in American history can be explained by the Cycle. And its relevance is not just found in the distant past; it is pertinent to recent elections, the present political environment, and the future. So, what does it mean for the election of 2012 and beyond? How did the forces of this Cycle affect the elections of the last few decades, and the most recent elections of 2006, 2008 and 2010? How does the Tea Party fit into all this? What is the 36-year cycle? Will the political polarization and divided government of the last 40 years continue? The author answers all those questions and many more. The book is divided into four sections. Section I introduces the Cycle with charts and quick histories. Section II delves into the unexpected forces that are causing the Cycle to occur. Section III reviews American history since George Washington, providing insights into how the phases of the Cycle have affected our entire history as a nation. And in the last section the author combines the lessons of the past, brings us up to the present, focuses on 2012, and then takes us into the future decades. In the end, one should come away with a historically solid way of evaluating the past, present, and future that one will not find anywhere else.

Comments

Umi Umi
Mr. Johnson has written a very special book that presents a remarkable insight about American political history. His depth of knowledge about American history puts him on par with the best historians.

He has discovered a sequence of cycles of American political history that have been at work since 1788 and continue today. The cycles are the result of unique facets of our constitution, adherence to a democratic tradition and even geography. You will be taken, step-by-step, from our founding through every significant federal election, through each significant presidency, through wars and recessions, through changes in our electorate and through all the important issues and debates of each generation. Each of these is carefully fit into the underlying cycles to demonstrate the pattern. Most importantly, this book shows the absolute necessity of adaption to change and the often surprising and unexpected ways adaption happens.

The book is extraordinarily workman-like in its methodical nature. The author presents his concept and then proceeds to "leave no stone unturned" in supporting it. It is filled with facts, figures, charts and graphs and yet never gets bogged down. Even when it pursues an issue in depth to prove a point, you never lose track of why this is necessary. I have rarely read a book that does such a good job of keeping the reader aware of its overall course and purpose while offering such a huge volume of detail. That is accomplished by an interesting technique of regular "look backs" and refreshments.

For history buffs, the seemingly never-ending recounting of historical events will be a treat in itself. Issues that were at the forefront of the American people a century or more ago seem "current" when you come to see them as part of an intact, ongoing process in which our "current" issues will take their place. Although accessible, understandable and even fun to any reasonably-educated person, this is a truly scholarly work.

What caught me completely off-guard, was that, although it was not the author's specific purpose, this book is a first rate presentation of American political history. I've read many books that attempted to give an overview of American history and none did a better or more thorough job than this one. Mr. Johnson has the ability to make events and issues easy to understand. The positions of politicians about the Mexican War, Slavery, Free Silver and many other important matters that elsewhere may take many pages, are deftly and succinctly clarified in one or two paragraphs. How many people are aware of the change in the role and importance of the Speaker of House and how it became a barometer of American politics? You will find yourself repeatedly saying, "Oh, now I understand what that was all about."

With all modesty, I consider myself to be well above average in my knowledge of history and in my logical thinking skills. I made every effort I could to challenge the book's concept and failed. I went to other sources attempting to find fault; every fact, every date and every description held up. More than once, I thought I had found a problem only to read further and discover that the "problem" was fully-addressed.

By the time I was about halfway through the book, it became clear to me that its soundness and accuracy grew not just from Mr. Johnson's encyclopedic knowledge and keen research and analytical abilities, but from his obvious love of our nation and its enduring uniqueness.

He doesn't ignore the bad things in our past, but shows how, via the American political adapting process that is inherent in the Cycles, they were overcome and we became a better country for it.

Because of the nature of this book which may cause the reader to view it as a "detailed guide to the future" (which it is not!) and its close association with current events, you should not give in to the temptation to read the final chapters (30 - 34) without having read the entire book!

Mr. Johnson is not just an historian presenting the past in a detached manner; he uses the past to reveal and support his insight about the nature of American political history and rationally extrapolates that into the first half of the twenty-first century.

To understand and accept his very extensive look forward, you have to understand and trust the quality and magnitude of his historical, political, social, financial and economic knowledge that, when combined with his analytical skills, provides him with the credentials to professionally contemplate the next few decades of American history. You cannot do that until you have been exposed to how he has applied his talents to the past.

If you love history and are an astute and inquiring reader, this book will become a basic part of your comprehension of our country's nature; past, present and future. In the broadest sense, this book reinforces your confidence in our country's structural sturdiness.

American history will never look the same to you again. I hate clichés, but have to say that, in the study of American political history, this is a "game changer".
Vertokini Vertokini
Historians and political scientists are not the only ones who pay close attention to the political cycles of American party history. Brian Johnson, a bright young writer in California, has just published a fascinating book on the political cycles of American party history from the founding of the country in 1788 to the present. Using a vast amount of data and analysis from American history, Johnson argues that the American party system has gone through 72-year cycles of development from the beginning of the Republic to the present: 1788 to 1860, 1860 to 1932, and 1932-2004. Since 2004, Johnson argues, we have been in a new Republican-dominated cycle which will last another 72 years until 2076. One need not agree with every aspect of Johnson's analysis to find his work a stimulating and important contribution to the study of American political and party history. Johnson is to be congratulated on his fine accomplishment, and I highly recommended his book to political scientists, historians, journalists, and anyone interested in American political and party history.

James S. Fleming
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York
Arilak Arilak
This was a very interesting read. The book is chock-full of statistics, which will be valuable long after the election in November comes and goes. I was amazed at the amount of research that took place in order to write this book. For example, in order to tell the reader what the average age of a congressman has been throughout the history of the U.S., the author had to research the birthdates of over 10,000 congressmen! And as he states in the book - yep, we've had THAT many since the nation's founding.
Moogugore Moogugore
The author presents a very convincing and well thought out case for the political cycles of the United States. The 72 Year Cycle is historically factual. It is very interesting and fascinating how history has repeated itself over and over. The author has shown this in detail. In light of the most recent events, I hope that the author's conclusion is correct and that history does indeed repeat itself with a Republican sweep in 2012.
Anen Anen
This book was interesting and easy to follow. Finally, a reason to HOPE - for a real change this time. I am sleeping better since reading this book, because Mr. Johnson's conclusions are based on facts that can be verified.
Shistus Shistus
This book should be used in all schools for civic and history classes. This is the kind of thing our children are never taught. So well documented and facinating.
Not-the-Same Not-the-Same
The author is very well researched with this book. So, facts aren't an issue. It's easy to see how he makes his conclusions, and a very interesting read.

There's a lot here, so plan on making a time investment. At the very least, it's a great history lesson.
The 72 Year Cycle is fascinating at how political parties show their dominance throughout time. It also helps provide encouragement for the upcoming election. This book is highly recommended for all readers to help understand the history of our parties. The author makes the book very interesting for all readers.