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eBook A Prayer for Burma ePub

eBook A Prayer for Burma ePub

by Kenneth Wong

  • ISBN: 1891661280
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Kenneth Wong
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Santa Monica Press (April 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 216
  • ePub book: 1711 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1762 kb
  • Other: doc lrf mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 764

Description

Kenneth Wong was born and raised in Rangoon, Burma, where he cultivated an addiction to aromatic Indian tea and an aversion to totalitarianism.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Kenneth Wong was born and raised in Rangoon, Burma, where he cultivated an addiction to aromatic Indian tea and an aversion to totalitarianism. He came to America at the age of twenty-one, not long after the 1988 massacre. After an unfulfilling decade in the financial industry, he decided to jump off his career path and begin making a living as a writer.

A Prayer for Burma book. After living in the United States for over a decade, Kenneth Wong returns to his native Burma-a country fraught with political upheaval and laden with superstition-to face the cultural specters of his own past and the spirit of a land trapped in time.

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After living in the United States for over a decade, Kenneth Wong returns to his native Burma - a country fraught with political upheaval and laden with superstition - to face the cultural specters of his own past and the spirit of a land trapped in time. In the tradition of Orwell, Maugham and Theroux, Wong shows Burma as an exotic place that invites, frightens, teases and haunts citizens and visitors alike with its unique mixture of ill-kept Edwardian structures, pockmarked English mansions, and glittering Buddhist temples.

Kenneth Wong 黃忠民, London, United Kingdom. This 98 year old former officer of the British Army has written two books ('Ditched in Burma' and 'Chinese saved Brits') on his experience during the war. He has been warmly received by President Ma Ying-jeou 馬英九 in a number of occasions and the couple thoroughly enjoyed their meetings with the President. I thanked Captain Fitzpatrick for fighting for our freedom. It was my absolute pleasure to meet this war hero in person this evening.

Let us unite in a moment of thought for the Burmese people.

Wong is the author of A Prayer for Burma, a travelogue and memoir about growing up under military rule. English Grammar in Use Book with Answers: A Self-Study Reference and Practice Book for Intermediate Learners of English by Raymond Murphy (Paperback, 2012). His short stories, articles, and essays have appeared in Myanmar Times, Irrawaddy, San Francisco Chronicle, AGNI, and Grain magazines, among others.

Start reading Easy Burmese on the way to the airport and begin communicating as soon as you land! .

Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes. BOOKS BY KENNETH E. HAGIN Redeemed From Poverty, Sickness and Spiritual Death What Faith Growin. Because for those who love with heart and soul there is no such thing as separation. The Name of Jesus Kenneth E Hagin - Ekklesia. 95 Pages·2005·556 KB·45,591 Downloads.

After living in the United States for over a decade, Kenneth Wong returns to his native Burma—a country fraught with political upheaval and laden with superstition—to face the cultural specters of his own past and the spirit of a land trapped in time.Sealed off from the outside world, first by an oppressive military regime’s isolationism and then by economic sanctions, Burma lives on like a lingering ghost of its colonial past. A Prayer for Burma is a beautiful, stunning portrait of the country as seen and remembered by a homecoming native battling his conflicting national, cultural, ideological, ancestral, and ethnic identities.In the tradition of Orwell, Maugam, and Theroux, Wong shows Burma as an exotic place that invites, frightens, teases, and haunts citizens and visitors alike with its unique mixture of ill-kept Edwardian structures, pockmarked English mansions, and glittering Buddhist temples. And as a former Burmese rediscovering Burma—an outsider who was once an insider—Wong reveals the courage, humor, and perseverance of the Burmese people and their endearing, yet mysterious way of life.

Comments

Silverbrew Silverbrew
A Prayer for Burma is the account of a Burmese-American who travels back to Burma (now Myanmar). In the opening, he says, " . . . returning to my motherland, just as an estranged son would to the mother he left behind, I hoped to get a better understanding of this colorful cultural mandala that was" part "of my identity." He then takes us along on his fascinating travels, sharing what he sees, what he thinks and what he feels. While this description might sound fairly direct and simple, the process and product are anything but. The author struggles to understand what any foreigner might, but he also struggles to settle feelings that only a foreigner who looks like the locals might need to do. And he willingly opens himself through his honest writing so that we benefit from his struggles, his defeats and his triumphs. Having just returned from Myanmar I can say that many of his insights still seemed valid in late 2004 and proved helpful during my trip. The scare about the planes, however, is somewhat dated, though I'd still stick with the private airlines (the government airline does tend to slam into the ground a bit too often). One thing to keep in mind while reading the book is that there is no such thing as The Burmese. The experience of different tribes can be vastly different. Hence, don't generalize beyond what is written about any particular person. Yes, everyone wants more freedom, but the most oppressed groups have it harder, see fewer opportunities and are likely to give very different responses when asked about things.
TheFresh TheFresh
It seems that several reviewers turn to this book as way to inform themselves about Burma before a trip. And there is valuable cultural information in the book that makes it good for this purpose. However, the book truly shines as a memoir that explores the meaning of identity and how culture, geography, and personality shape an individual. The writer's perspective is unique as he brings his heritage as a native of Burma, a person of Chinese decent, and an American to the mix in an attempt to explore how these identities meld together in sometimes immutable ways. A great read for anyone interested in Sociology, or simply looking to see Buddha and Shakespeare brought together at last.
Arcanescar Arcanescar
I read this book shortly before going Burma. While he has some obvious insights (He's Burmese and he's actually been there), his writing is quite weak and his sense of adventure is pathetic. He spends most of the time complaining about the heat and discomfort and no time at all challenging himself or doing any real journalism. He comes across like a spoiled American who doesn't want to leave his hotel room unless he's on a guided tour. Burma does not exactly jump off the pages of this book.

The book is not a total wash, however. When he is describing his friends and speaking about Burmese literature and culture there are some wonderful things the reader can learn about Burma. The book would've been much more successful if the writer had made it less of a personal journey (I had a more interesting time in Burma, but I wouldn't write a book about it), and focused more on educating the reader about his culture. Having identity issues is a good topic and a sign of the times, but it didn't work for me in this book.

Finding George Orwell in Burma by Emma Larkin is a much better read.
Wenaiand Wenaiand
Even if you have no interest whatsoever in Burma, you still need to read this book. This is a book for people who love beautiful writing. It's about exploring personal identity; it's about culture, about being human, about revisitng and reflecting on one's past, on roots, on time and on what it means to exist on this complex planet of ours.
But if you do have an interest in Burma, then you'll get quite a bonus with this book. Mr. Wong takes you with him as he walks the street's of today's Rangoon gone modern and reflects on the Rangoon gone mad of the 80s and the movement for democracy.
Employing a rapier wit and self-deprecating humor throughout, Mr. Wong will have you laughing and yet realizing at the same time the poignant sadness of the kalaidescopic Burmese culture--sad, beautiful, joyful, and endearing all at the same time. A Prayer for Burma is a sensitive, extended essay on what it means to be multicultural, intelligent, and human.
Read it; you'll be glad you did.
Fenrikree Fenrikree
This is a very engaging book, full of lots of quirky humor and insights into Burma as it is now. The author's role as an expat returning to Burma as a visitor give him a rare perspective, understanding local culture and language, yet feeling an outsider and being treated as one. It is more up to date than most literature on Burma, being based on visits during the last 2-3 years. Highly recommended.
Yellow Judge Yellow Judge
Kenneath Wong's beautiful writing style and metaphor of being 'ghost' inspire me in many ways. His book shows vivid scence of unique culture of Burma in which its people are struggled to live under politically deprived condition. With much admiration to his writing, I also want to pray that this unique golden land and its people be escaped from the shadow of military uniforms and oppression.