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eBook Advocacy Organizations and Collective Action ePub

eBook Advocacy Organizations and Collective Action ePub

by Aseem Prakash,Mary Kay Gugerty

  • ISBN: 0521198380
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Aseem Prakash,Mary Kay Gugerty
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (January 17, 2011)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1751 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1712 kb
  • Other: mbr lit mobi docx
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 960

Description

their advocacy endeavours. This article seeks to contribute to knowledge in this area by studying the case of a disabled people’s organisation in Cambodia. The resource dependency of disabled people’s organisations on international development partners results in their ideologies and strategies being driven by the latter. This has not only fragmented their resources, but also made their endeavours less relevant to the needs of people with disabilities.

Aseem Prakash Mary Kay Gugerty2010 m. lapkričio 25 . Aseem Prakash is Professor of Political Science and the Walker Family Professor for the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington. lapkričio 25 d. Cambridge University Press.

the case studies in Advocacy Organizations and Collective Action offer insights that I expect will make the volume useful for courses in political science, political sociology, and for organizational behavior courses on advocacy and the global nonprofit sector.

This book brings together a top-flight team of scholars to address the factors that help shape the advocacy activities of international NGOs.

Advocacy organizations are viewed as actors motivated primarily by principled beliefs. This volume outlines a new agenda for the study of advocacy organizations, proposing a model of NGOs as collective actors that seek to fulfil normative concerns and instrumental incentives, face collective action problems, and compete as well as collaborate with other advocacy actors. This book brings together a top-flight team of scholars to address the factors that help shape the advocacy activities of international NGOs.

Online ISBN: 9780511762635. Advocacy organizations are viewed as actors motivated primarily by principled beliefs.

and Collective Action, of course, do not base their rather pessimistic picture on anything as antique as Michels’ iron law . Prakash and Gugerty may be prepared to acknowledge that. 3. The Innovation Journal: The Public Sector Innovation Journal, Volume 17(2), 2012, article 10.

and Collective Action, of course, do not base their rather pessimistic picture on anything as antique as Michels’ iron law, nor do they seek explanations in social structures and organizational rules of behavior. Their preference is for a somewhat more modern contribution to social scientific literature, though one that arguably has an even longer pedigree-all the way back to the political theory of possessive individualism as it emerged in the writings of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke.

1. Advocacy Organizations and Collective Action. 7. Green Clubs: Collective Action and Voluntary Environmental Programs. Voluntary Programs: A Club Theory Approach.

Advocacy Organizations and Collective Action (Cambridge University Press, 2010) (with Mary Kay Gugerty). Voluntary Programs: A Club Theory Perspective (The MIT Press, 2009) (with Matt Potoski). Coping with Globalization (Routledge, 2000) (with Jeffrey Hart).

Advocacy organizations and collective action. A Prakash, MK Gugerty. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Nancy Bell Evans Professor of Nonprofit Management, Evans School of Public Policy & Governance. Articles Cited by. Title. Ethnic diversity, social sanctions, and public goods in Kenya. Trust but verify? Voluntary regulation programs in the nonprofit sector. Regulation & Governance 4 (1), 22-47, 2010.

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Advocacy organizations are viewed as actors motivated primarily by principled beliefs. This volume outlines a new agenda for the study of advocacy organizations, proposing a model of NGOs as collective actors that seek to fulfill normative concerns and instrumental incentives, face collective action problems, and compete as well as collaborate with other advocacy actors. The firm analogy is a useful way of studying advocacy actors because individuals via advocacy NGOs make choices which are analytically similar to those that shareholders make in the context of firms. The authors view advocacy NGOs as special types of firms that make strategic choices in policy markets which, along with creating public goods, support organizational survival, visibility, and growth. Advocacy NGOs' strategy can therefore be understood as a response to opportunities to supply distinct advocacy products to well defined constituencies as well as a response to normative or principled concerns.