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eBook After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City, 1524–1730 ePub

eBook After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City, 1524–1730 ePub

by William F. Connell

  • ISBN: 0806141751
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: William F. Connell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (March 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1815 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1992 kb
  • Other: lit lrf lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 597

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1) This is one reason why William E Connell's skillful use of these documents makes his study of the politics of native town governments in Mexico City such a welcome addition

1) This is one reason why William E Connell's skillful use of these documents makes his study of the politics of native town governments in Mexico City such a welcome addition. While covering the period from the conquest until the early decades of the eighteenth century, Connell finds the majority of his evidence about the changing character of the politics of native governments between the 1560s and the 1680s. Generally it was in the best interest of Spanish officials to leave native communities to govern their own affairs within a framework imposed by royal government

book by William F. Connell.

book by William F. Conquistador Hern n Cort s, following the city's surrender in 1521, established a governing body to organize its reconstruction. Cort s was careful to appoint native people to govern who had held positions of authority before his arrival, establishing a pattern that endured for centuries.

Geographic Name: Mexico City (Mexico) Politics and government 16th century. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Geographic Name: Mexico City (Mexico) Politics and government 17th century. Geographic Name: Mexico City (Mexico) Politics and government 18th century. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

By William F. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2011. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 .

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Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Introduction : continuity and the emergence of indigenous self-government in Mexico Tenochtitlan Undermining consensus : the origins of political culture in the indigenous government, 1536-1572 Indigenous government in transition, 1573-1610 A city emergent : viceregal challenges to local politics, 1629-1654 Diversity and the infiltration of the Cabildo, 1650-1680 A Tecpan divided : a mature political culture, 1660-1730 Appendix. Rulers of Mexico Tenochtitlan, 1520-1734.

After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Government in Mexico City, 1524-1730

After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Government in Mexico City, 1524-1730. University of Oklahoma Press. Pages, 330. Presentations chevron down. William Connell, 56th Congreso Internacional de Americanistas, " Transformaciones políticas en el Cabildo indígena de México Tenochtitlan, 1562-1646,," Salamanca, Spain. William Connell, European Social Science and History Conference, " La familia Dongo Prosecution and Detective work in a Notorious Murder in Mexico City, 1789," Belfast, UK. (2018).

It is one of the most important cultural and financial centres in the world.

During the Porfiriato, members of the Mexican aristocracy were very active in politics

The Spaniards respected this system and added to it, resulting in many unions between Aztec and Spanish nobility. During the Porfiriato, members of the Mexican aristocracy were very active in politics. Prince Agustín de Iturbide y Green, Maximilian's adopted son, who had graduated from Georgetown University, renounced his claim to the throne and title. Iturbide returned to Mexico and served as an officer in the Mexican army.

William F. Connell, After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City, 1524-1730. The Americas 68:2 (October 2011), 286-287

William F. The Americas 68:2 (October 2011), 286-287. Volume 83, number 3, Summer 2008, 389-392. Historia Mexicana n. 24, Abril-Junio 2007, 1427-1432. NATIONAL GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS Mellon New Directions Fellowship, 2015-2018.

The Spanish invasion of Mexico in 1519 left the capital city, Tenochtitlan, in ruins. Conquistador Hernán Cortés, following the city's surrender in 1521, established a governing body to organize its reconstruction. Cortés was careful to appoint native people to govern who had held positions of authority before his arrival, establishing a pattern that endured for centuries. William F. Connell's After Moctezuma: Indigenous Politics and Self-Government in Mexico City, 1524–1730 reveals how native self-government in former Tenochtitlan evolved over time as the city and its population changed.

Drawing on extensive research in Mexico's Archivo General de la Nación, Connell shows how the hereditary political system of the Mexica was converted into a government by elected town councilmen, patterned after the Spanish cabildo, or municipal council. In the process, the Spanish relied upon existing Mexica administrative entities—the native ethnic state, or altepetl of Mexico Tenochtitlan, became the parcialidad of San Juan Tenochtitlan, for instance—preserving indigenous ideas of government within an imposed Spanish structure. Over time, the electoral system undermined the preconquest elite and introduced new native political players, facilitating social change. By the early eighteenth century, a process that had begun in the 1500s with the demise of Moctezuma and the royal line of Tenochtitlan had resulted in a politically independent indigenous cabildo.

After Moctezuma is the first systematic study of the indigenous political structures at the heart of New Spain. With careful attention to relations among colonial officials and indigenous power brokers, Connell shows that the ongoing contest for control of indigenous government in Mexico City made possible a new kind of political system neither wholly indigenous nor entirely Spanish. Ultimately, he offers insight into the political voice Tenochtitlan's indigenous people gained with the ability to choose their own leaders—exercising power that endured through the end of the colonial period and beyond.