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eBook The Right to Privacy ePub

eBook The Right to Privacy ePub

by Caroline Kennedy

  • ISBN: 0679744347
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Caroline Kennedy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (February 4, 1997)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1138 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1478 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 460

Description

Caroline Kennedy is an attorney and the coauthor (with Ellen Alderman) of The Right to Privacy and In Our .

Caroline Kennedy is an attorney and the coauthor (with Ellen Alderman) of The Right to Privacy and In Our Defense. Ellen Alderman is the coauthor, with Caroline Kennedy, of The Right to Privacy and In Our Defense: The Bill of Rights in Action. Could any book dealing with heavy issues such as privacy be more interesting - sometimes even entertaining - than this? To read The Right to Privacy by Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy has been an absolute joy ride throughout - not the issues therein but the "stories" displayed to illustrate a wide range of privacy issues.

The Right to Privacy book. Filed in the library of my mind I feel like I've taken a class on law, history and psychology taught by Caroline Kennedy herself. For these authors to take a second and memorialize where we've come, will hopefully help the next generation not make the same mistakes.

The right to privacy is a very serious issue in the United States. Alderman and Kennedy do a very fine job explaining how easily our basic fundamental right to privacy can be violated. I highly recommend this book as it is very easy to read and understand. We Don't Have The Rights We Think We Have. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 21 years ago. Many Americans adopt the concept that if they personally think something is right, then there must be an existing law that agrees. We think we have a basic right to privacy, but, surprise, we don't.

In this eye-opening and sometimes hair-raising book, Alderman and Kennedy survey hundreds of recent cases in which ordinary citizens have come up against the intrusions of government, businesses, the news media, and their own neighbors. At once shocking and instructive, up-to-date and rich in historical perspective, The Right to Private is an invaluable guide to one of the most charged issues of our time.

Although the word privacy does not appear in the Constitution, most of us believe that we have an inalienable right to. .

Although the word privacy does not appear in the Constitution, most of us believe that we have an inalienable right to be left alone. Yet in arenas that range from the battlefield of abortion to the information highway, privacy is under siege. In this eye-opening and sometimes hair-raising book, Alderman and Kennedy survey hundreds of recent cases in which ordinary citizens have come up against the intrusions of government, businesses, the news media, and their own neighbors.

The Right to Privacy. by Ellen Alderman · Caroline Kennedy.

With thoughtful personal introductions written by Caroline herself, and beautiful new original artwork by award-winning artist, Jon J Muth. Article by article, intention by intention, the first ten amendments are examined through cases that have challenged and been interpreted through them. The Right to Privacy.

Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -The Right to Privacy by ALDERMAN Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

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Caroline Bouvier Kennedy (born November 27, 1957) is an American author, attorney, and diplomat who served as the United States Ambassador to Japan from 2013 to 2017

Caroline Bouvier Kennedy (born November 27, 1957) is an American author, attorney, and diplomat who served as the United States Ambassador to Japan from 2013 to 2017. She is a prominent member of the Kennedy family and the only surviving child of President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. Kennedy was five days shy of her sixth birthday when her father was assassinated on November 22, 1963

Can the police strip-search a woman who has been arrested for a minor traffic violation? Can a magazine publish an embarrassing photo of you without your permission? Does your boss have the right to read your email? Can a company monitor its employees' off-the-job lifestyles--and fire those who drink, smoke, or live with a partner of the same sex? Although the word privacy does not appear in the Constitution, most of us believe that we have an inalienable right to be left alone. Yet in arenas that range from the battlefield of abortion to the information highway, privacy is under siege. In this eye-opening and sometimes hair-raising book, Alderman and Kennedy survey hundreds of recent cases in which ordinary citizens have come up against the intrusions of government, businesses, the news media, and their own neighbors. At once shocking and instructive, up-to-date and rich in historical perspective, The Right to Private is an invaluable guide to one of the most charged issues of our time."Anyone hoping to understand the sometimes precarious state of privacy in modern America should start by reading this book."--Washington Post Book World"Skillfully weaves together unfamiliar, dramatic case histories...a book with impressive breadth."--Time

Comments

Vudozilkree Vudozilkree
I am not a legal eagle---Not into mystery novels or NCIS. But this book had me hooked at the very beginning with the account of arrests of women for minor traffic offenses (e.g. unpaid parking tickets) and taken to jail where they were stripped searched---including body cavity searches. No such treatment for men. At worst, they got a pat down. I was astonished to learn that the Right to Privacy was NOT part of our constitution.

I found the book entirely thought-provoking, it kept my interest and generated some animated conversation with houseguests.
Netlandinhabitant Netlandinhabitant
I enjoyed this book, even though it is heavy on legal court cases. Don't let that fool you, though, it's not a legal reference. This book covers significant cases in privacy using a very interesting approach. There a interviews and behind-the-scenes stories that explain what happened, how the plaintiff felt, and what the outcome was.

If you liked this book you will love "The Digital Umbrella." It is a great compliment to this book.
Sat Sat
Important book for those who teach the Constitution.
Thiama Thiama
Perfect condition and came in super quick. Really interesting too!
Erienan Erienan
Interesting read.
Weiehan Weiehan
a bit boring but just shows what big brother can do to innocent people . good to see caroline standing up for ordinary people .
Rollers from Abdun Rollers from Abdun
Could any book dealing with heavy issues such as privacy be more interesting - sometimes even entertaining - than this? To read The Right to Privacy by Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy has been an absolute joy ride throughout - not the issues therein but the "stories" displayed to illustrate a wide range of privacy issues. To describe the reading experience of this book as compelling, gripping, spellbinding, or captivating might sound weird, but that was I have felt while reading this book. I am certain to say that this book is much more interesting and attention-grabbing than many thrillers or crime novels.

The authors have done a marvelous job in integrating seamlessly a variety of court cases with their implications and impacts on privacy issues. They have told and re-told the wealth of different stories in a way that any reader would be so into them instantly. Their way of story-telling are not only very human and sympathetic - to both victims and the accused - but also very well-balanced in explaining why things are panning out that way.

Their analyses and comments on a range of privacy issues also appear very thoughtful, well-rounded, superbly balanced, and therefore insightful that could endure a test of significant periods of time.

Lots of things - legislation, regulations, torts, policies, procedures, perceptions, awareness, etc. - have been changed since this book was published more than 10 years ago. However, the implications, lessons learned, and commonalities from the cases dealt with in this book seem still very relevant and meaningful. Or maybe even more than before.

To quote from their conclusion: "This combination of education and altered expectations may hold the key to privacy protection in the future. There is a growing consensus that if the jumble of state and federal statutes, consumer pressure, and self-help is to be unified into meaningful privacy protection in the digital age, then we will have to do more than pass a law. (...) With so much information available at a key stroke, it is now inescapable that there will be times when what is whispered in the closet will indeed be shouted from the housetops."

Well, that "times" has already arrived. ...
Although the word "privacy" does not appear in the United States Constitution, most Americans believe that their right to privacy is not just legally protected but fundamental to their lives, their way of living, and this country's democratic system. Abstract and difficult to define, privacy is nonetheless perceived as one of our most basic and coveted rights.
But is it? How well are we protected? And what, exactly, are we protected from?
Through a seamless interweaving of landmark cases, lesser - known but equally important trial decisions, and dozens of anecdotal narratives, Ellen Alderman and Caroline Kennedy, authors of the best - selling In Our Defense, make an urgent and complicated issue more absorbing and accessible than ever before. In thier hands, we can finally see the law translated into relevant human experience.
The Right to Privacy delves into six general areas: Privacy versus Law Enforcement, Privacy and Your Self, Privacy versus The Press, Privacy versus The Voyeur, Privacy in the Workplace, and Privacy and Information. Can you refuse to comply when a police officer asks to look through your luggage? Is there anything you can do to prevent all those computerized data banks from filling up with more and more personal information about you? Can television cameras follow a breaking news story right into your home? Does your boss have a right to know that you are homosexual? a smoker? dating a co - worker? Who is entitled to make life - or - death decisions for someone who is no longer able to do so? Legally,the answer to each of these questions revolves around the right to privacy.
We live in a society in which our right to privacy is much discussed, misunderstood, and, in many cases, seriously threatened. The Right to Privacy will enrich the discussion, shed light on many of the misunderstandings, and illuminate the real - life, everyday impact of one of the most important issues of our time.