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eBook Remaking Micronesia: Discourses over Development in a Pacific Territory, 1944-1982 (Spie Proceedings Series; 3345) ePub

eBook Remaking Micronesia: Discourses over Development in a Pacific Territory, 1944-1982 (Spie Proceedings Series; 3345) ePub

by David L. Hanlon

  • ISBN: 0824818946
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: David L. Hanlon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (March 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1201 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1608 kb
  • Other: mobi azw doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 545

Description

David Hanlon is a past director of the Center for Pacific Islands Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

David Hanlon is a past director of the Center for Pacific Islands Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. James B Johnson, USNR, Ret. lives in Florida. In the late 1940s and early 1950s he was the Naval Administrator for the Northern Mariana Islands, The Volcano Islands, and the Bonin Islands. He returned to the Saipan during the Trust Territory administration of the islands and served in a number of capacities as a civilian.

All of the discourses over economic development in Micronesia anticipated the termination of the 1947 Trusteeship Agreement between the United States and the United Nations

All of the discourses over economic development in Micronesia anticipated the termination of the 1947 Trusteeship Agreement between the United States and the United Nations. Negotiations over an alternative and future political status for the islands came to center on free association, a curious hybrid concept that sought to sustain American strategic interests through limited concessions to local autonomy.

Remaking Micronesia stands as an important, imaginative, much needed contribution to the study of Micronesia, American policy in the Pacific, and the larger debate about development

Remaking Micronesia stands as an important, imaginative, much needed contribution to the study of Micronesia, American policy in the Pacific, and the larger debate about development. It will be an important source of insight and critique for scholars and students working at the intersection of history, culture, and power in the Pacific. David Hanlon is a past director of the Center for Pacific Islands Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

The Carolina, Mariana and Marshall Islands have experienced world war, atomic weapons testing and varying brands of colonialism in the 20th century. Following the seizure of the islands from Japan, agencies of the US government sought to better possess and control the area through a series of developmental initiatives. Interdisciplinary in its approach, this text goes beyond the liberal discourse surrounding modernity to examine what economic development actually entailed.

Remaking Micronesia, by David Hanlon, is a post-modern history of the . Elevation ranges from sea level to over 4200 m at the top of Mauna Kea on the Big Island.

Remaking Micronesia, by David Hanlon, is a post-modern history of the Caroline, Marshall, and Northern Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific. All of the islands in the region are of volcanic origin, but the ages of the islands vary widely from over 40 million years (Guam) to a few hours (active volcanoes on the Big Island and the far northern Mariana Islands).

For my parents, David Edward Hanlon, J. and Dorothy Mae Brock Hanlon, who helped me travel from Hyde . If successful, the many and varied plans for development would have resulted in a total remaking of Micronesia. and Dorothy Mae Brock Hanlon, who helped me travel from Hyde Park to Mānoa, and for the people of the islands called Micronesia, those very special places in between. There is, however, a rich, deeply entangled history in the gap between intent and effect over efforts at economic development in the area that. Mapping hegemony (Richard III, 1957; US Navy). Chapter . came to be officially known after  as the United States Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

This is an important, imaginative, much needed contribution to the study of Micronesia. Remaking Micronesia : Discourses over Development in a Pacific Territory, 1944-1982.

Remaking Micronesia: Discourses over Development in a Pacific Territory, 1944-1982 (Spie .

Remaking Micronesia: Discourses over Development in a Pacific Territory, 1944-1982 (Spie Proceedings Series; 3345). ISBN 9780824818944 (978-0-8248-1894-4) Hardcover, University of Hawaii Press, 1998. Learn More at LibraryThing. David L. Hanlon at LibraryThing.

Remaking Micronesia, by David Hanlon, is a. .

Remaking Micronesia, by David Hanlon, is a post-modern history of the Caroline, Marshall, and Northern Mariana Islands in the Western Pacic. The remaking of Micronesia and Micronesians is, in part, about the way dominant systems of power preserve themselves. strategic interests (p. 23). This theme permeates the entire work.

Remaking Micronesia: Discourses over development in a Pacific territory, 1944–1982. On Hezel’s The first taint of civilization. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press. In D. Munro & B. V. Lal (Ed., Texts and contexts: Reflections in Pacific Islands historiography (pp. 202–212).

America's efforts at economic development in the Caroline, Mariana, and Marshall Islands proved to be about transforming in dramatic fashion people who occupied real estate deemed vital to American strategic concerns. Called "Micronesians," these island people were regarded as other, and their otherness came to be seen as incompatible with American interests.

And so, underneath the liberal rhetoric that surrounded arguments, proposals, and programs for economic development was a deeper purpose. America's domination would be sustained by the remaking of these islands into places that had the look, feel, sound, speed, smell, and taste of America - had the many and varied plans actually succeeded. However, the gap between intent and effect holds a rich and deeply entangled history.

Remaking Micronesia stands as an important, imaginative, much needed contribution to the study of Micronesia, American policy in the Pacific, and the larger debate about development. It will be an important source of insight and critique for scholars and students working at the intersection of history, culture, and power in the Pacific.

Comments

Vichredag Vichredag
I found Mr. Hanlon's book a laborious read, to say the least. He uses incredibly long sentences. Picking one of many at random, I counted seventy words and 10 commas. The theme of the book seems to be one of conspiracy; the United States verses the people of Micronesia. His use of document sources is extensive, and much of what he concludes may or may not be true. However, I think his conspiracy theory might have been more convincing if he had made the effort to go beyond the documents, and sought out individuals still living who were very much a part of the U S. effort to administer the islands after World War II. Just as a for-instance, Capt. James B Johnson, USNR, Ret. lives in Florida. In the late 1940s and early 1950s he was the Naval Administrator for the Northern Mariana Islands, The Volcano Islands, and the Bonin Islands. He returned to the Saipan during the Trust Territory administration of the islands and served in a number of capacities as a civilian. I myself lived on Saipan for five years, doing my own research. Not once did I meet an individual who did not hold Capt. Johnson in the highest regard. I think if Hanlon had gone to Capt. Johnson and others like him for their in-put on his conspiracy theory he might have come away with a completely different appreciation for what was attempted in the early American administration of these islands. Bruce M. Petty, Fairfield, Ca.
Bandiri Bandiri
Really great critique of international development attempts throughout Micronesia.