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eBook Big Boys' Rules: The Sas and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA ePub

eBook Big Boys' Rules: The Sas and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA ePub

by Mark Urban

  • ISBN: 0571168094
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Mark Urban
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber; New Ed edition (1992)
  • Pages: 266
  • ePub book: 1476 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1640 kb
  • Other: azw txt lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 549

Description

He is the author of several books, including Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA, The Men Who Broke Napoleon's Codes and Rifles: Six Years with Wellington's Legendary Sharpshooters.

In this book, defence specialist and war correspondent Mark Urban explores covert operations against the IRA from the mid-1970s to the Loughgall shooting in 1987. Drawing on interviews with people who have served at the heart of intelligence and special operations in Ulster, as well as with members of paramilitary groups, this book examines the roles of the army, the police and special branch, as well as both MI5 and MI6. The book also looks at the shoot to kill allegations, and records members of the security forces describing the deliberate deception of the press and courts in Ulster

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The SAS describes its attitude to the use of lethal force as 'Big boys' .

The SAS describes its attitude to the use of lethal force as 'Big boys' games, big boys' rules'. Anyone caught with a gun or bomb can expect to be shot. This is a book that needed to be written and which fulfils the essentials of any Ulster story; it expands understanding beyond fragmented jingoism and newspaper headlines. John Stalker, Sunday Times. He is the author of several books, including Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA, The Men Who Broke Napoleon's Codes and Rifles: Six Years with Wellington's Legendary Sharpshooters.

In Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA Mark Urban meticulously explores the security forces' covert operations in Northern Ireland: from the mid-1970s, when they were stepped up, to the Loughall ambush in 1987, in which eight IRA Provisionals were killed.

In this book, defence specialist and war correspondent Mark Urban explores covert operations against the IRA from the mid-1970s to the Loughgall . Big Boys' Rules: The Sas and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA. by Mark Urban.

In 2001, Urban published his first book on the Napoleonic Wars in the Iberian Peninsula. Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the secret struggle against the IRA (1992).

For the biologist, see Mark C. Urban. In 2001, Urban published his first book on the Napoleonic Wars in the Iberian Peninsula. UK Eyes Alpha: Inside British Intelligence (1996).

Explores covert operations against the IRA from 1976 to 1987.

Books : Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA (Paperback). Explores covert operations against the IRA from 1976 to 1987. Drawing on interviews with people who have served at the heart of intelligence and special operations in Ulster as well as with members of paramilitary groups this book examines the roles of the Army the police MI5 and MI6. Specifications. Urban's choice of the title for his book is deeply ironic, and a slap in the face of gung-ho soldiering. He took it from a quote from a serving SAS soldier 'If they (the IRA) want to play with big boy's toys, then they'll have to expect to play by big boy's rules'. In Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA Mark Urban meticulously explores the security forces' covert operations in Northern Ireland: from the mid-1970s, when they were stepped up, to the Loughall ambush in 1987, in which eight IRA Provisionals were killed.

The SAS describes its attitude to the use of lethal force as 'Big boys' games, big boys' rules'. Anyone caught with a gun or bomb can expect to be shot. In Big Boys' Rules: The SAS and the Secret Struggle Against the IRA Mark Urban meticulously explores the security forces' covert operations in Northern Ireland: from the mid-1970s, when they were stepped up, to the Loughall ambush in 1987, in which eight IRA Provisionals were killed. While charting the successes and failures of special operations during the troubles, Urban reveals the unenviable dilemmas faced by intelligence chiefs engaged in a daily struggle against one of the world's most sophisticated terrorist organisations.

'This is a book that needed to be written and which fulfils the essentials of any Ulster story; it expands understanding beyond fragmented jingoism and newspaper headlines.' John Stalker, Sunday Times

Comments

Ionzar Ionzar
The title of this book is misleading. This book spends a minimal amount of time discussing the SAS's operations and a great deal of time discussing the relationship between the RUC and the military. If you are interested in the strategic significance of the actions taken in Northern Ireland this is the book for you. If you are looking for a book similar to Urban's most recent book, "Task Force Black" this is not it. Despite that I did enjoy the book and would still recommend it to those interested in Northern Ireland.
Beardana Beardana
A well researched book, and interesting if you have the need to know what happened to whom and when. Not an entertaining read though, as some semi historical books can be.
Kirinaya Kirinaya
very good
Anazan Anazan
If one buys this book expecting an account of 22SAS's fight against the Provos during the 'Troubles' in Ulster as I did, you'll be unhappy.
It's basically a recounting of 'ALL' (oh suuure!) the secret agencies activities in Ulster from the late 70's onwards but only a portion is focused on the 'ice cream boys' and even that is heavily, heavily tinged with the author's prejudices of whether one is permitted to shoot a terrorist or not.
(After all, killers have feelings too).
As an academic exercise - two out of five stars (Additional to the obvious pro-gunman sympathy of the author there were several large inaccuracies presented as factual. Hint to writer - for their own reasons not everybody tells you the truth, and you might find other texts on this conflict very instructive if you care to read them carefully. Of course research isn't everyone's strong suit....even when they claim otherwise)
At the moment, this household has an adequate supply of toilet tissue, but if and when we fall short we shall have this book to put behind us.
Shame the sheets aren't perforated.JMHO. Avoid.
PS Author borrows from Michael Asher's 'Shoot to Kill' bio......to the point that if you've read that, you've basically read this from an SAS involvement discussion, anyway.
Kuve Kuve
Urban's book is written is a newspaper style reporting facts without military or political content. The two reasons it is one of his early books and the current war on terrorists hadn't started. He could easily update book increase it value by going back adding comparison to current conflicts.
Voodoozragore Voodoozragore
The subtitle of this book "The SAS and the secret struggle against the IRA," is slightly misleading because it is about more than the SAS's struggle against the IRA. But how all covert units and agencies of the British and even allied nations such as the American FBI were employed in this fight. It describes how the British apparatus for fighting the IRA was structured, how this buerocratic machine deployed various units, and finally how these units executed tasks in the field. However, I caution the reader to do so warily some disinformation does crop up. For example this volume attributes the SAS's foreknowledge which led to the ambush at Loughgall to informant intelligence when in fact it is now understood to have been generated by an electronic bug.
JoldGold JoldGold
SAS vs. IRA

Mark Urban's book "Big Boys' Rules: The Secret Struggle Against the IRA" provides an in-depth account of the counter-insurgent activities of the elite British 22 Special Air Service (SAS) and other security forces in the Northern Ireland conflict beginning in the 1970s and ending with the 1987 Loughgall incident. Urban draws on extensive interviews with those involved in intelligence and special operations in Northern Ireland during this time. He details how the security force apparatus was structured, effectively deployed, and how the British executed tasks in the field.
Having served a number of times as an officer in Northern Ireland, this book filled in a number of gaps in my own knowledge. The reading of this book should be compulsory for anyone wishing to comment on the fight against Irish terrorism and the methods employed by each opposing side.