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eBook The Post-American World ePub

eBook The Post-American World ePub

by Fareed Zakaria (author)

  • ISBN: 0393341232
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Fareed Zakaria (author)
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: WW Norton & Co; 2nd Revised edition edition (May 13, 2011)
  • ePub book: 1134 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1968 kb
  • Other: txt azw azw lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 958

Description

Ships from and sold by BOOKSPACE. We also need to realize that not all Muslims are of the radical kind, and that we need to be more wise and discerning.

The Post-American World is a non-fiction book by American journalist Fareed Zakaria.

Fareed Zakaria's "The Post-American" World: Release . " is an interesting and informative read. He explains the situation of the United States in view of arising new economic powers - most noteably China and India. And, explains the motivations and strategies of both. It is simple to read and extremely enlightening. I would recommend as a good read for all Americans. No agenda, just the facts.

The Post-American World book. Zakaria claims that the US has been a liberalizing and modernizing force, striving always to bring the virtues of democracy and liberal market economies to the world

The Post-American World book. Zakaria claims that the US has been a liberalizing and modernizing force, striving always to bring the virtues of democracy and liberal market economies to the world. And this is where the fundamental flaws in Zakaria's analysis are most obvious. Zakaria continues the western intellectual tradition of portraying history as the interplay of nations, ignoring the class structure within those nations.

The post-american world. This is a book not about the decline of America but rather about the rise of everyone else

The post-american world. Fareed Zakaria has been consistently brilliant in his analysis of world affairs but also something far more rare: he has turned out to have been right. Now he's produced another masterpiece of insight. With great reporting and cultural understanding, Zakaria explains a future shaped by many emerging power centers. This is a book not about the decline of America but rather about the rise of everyone else. It is about the great transformation taking place around the world, a transformation that, though often discussed, remains poorly understood.

Fareed Zakaria writes a foreign affairs column for The Post

Fareed Zakaria writes a foreign affairs column for The Post. Born in India, Zakaria received a BA from Yale College and a PhD from Harvard University. Honors & Awards: National Magazine Award, 2010.

At first blush, The Post-American World, by Fareed Zakaria, seems to fall into the same genre. This is a relentlessly intelligent book that eschews simple-minded projections from crisis to collapse

At first blush, The Post-American World, by Fareed Zakaria, seems to fall into the same genre. This is a relentlessly intelligent book that eschews simple-minded projections from crisis to collapse. There is certainly plenty to bemoan - from the disappearing dollar to the subprime disaster, from rampant anti-Americanism to wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that will take years to win. Yet Zakaria’s is not another exercise in declinism. His point is not the demise of Gulliver, but the rise of the rest. After all, how can this giant follow Rome and Britain onto the dust heap.

So begins Fareed Zakaria's important new work on the era we are now entering. Following on the success of his best-selling The Future of Freedom, Zakaria describes with equal prescience a world in which the United States will no longer dominate the global economy, orchestrate geopolitics, or overwhelm cultures. He sees the "rise of the rest"-the growth of countries like China, India, Brazil, Russia, and many others-as the great story of our time, and one that will reshape the world

Comments

Vivados Vivados
This is a significant new survey of the comparative decline of the U.S. from its position at the end of the Cold War. It correctly points out that the decline is more due to the rise of other powers than to the decline of the U.S. However, it not only has the shortcomings inherent in a short survey, but has some deeper flaws.
First, while it discusses China at great length, it fails to discuss two of the other important players in the new multipolar world--Russia and Germany--in any detail. Both are important industrial powers. Russia is important because it remains militarily powerful but, suspicious of the rest of the world, plays its own game and is all too eager to capitalize on U.S. errors. Germany is important because of its economic power--despite its comparatively small size, it has the third highest GDP in the world, and is beginning to get over its postwar reluctance to take a leadership role.
A second weakness in the book is that it does not adequately describe the degree of U.S. decline. While it notes the high quality of U.S. universities, it fails to note the failure of the U.S. educational system at the K-12 level, and the decay of U.S. infrastructure. Unless these problems are addressed, U.S. decline will become more than comparative.
Bradeya Bradeya
Fareed Zakaria's "The Post-American" World: Release 2.0" is an interesting and informative read. He explains the situation of the United States in view of arising new economic powers - most noteably China and India. And, explains the motivations and strategies of both. It is simple to read and extremely enlightening. I would recommend as a good read for all Americans. No agenda, just the facts.
Tygokasa Tygokasa
This is an extremely insightful book resting on probably most clearheaded appreciation of what's going on around the world that should be read by any and everyone interested in world affairs. On the downside, it contains too many intellectually facile overgeneralizations that well informed cosmopolitans who lack specialized knowledge of specific topics tend to make. Since Zakaria is in fact one of such people and these do no harm to the general insights contained in the book, perhaps I should not overly critical. More important, though, is that this intellectual facile-ness extends into the conclusions that Zakaria draws from his insights: they read too much like irresponsible punditry. Of course, one needs not agree with his conclusions to appreciate the insights, of which there is plenty.

To cut it short, at the heart of Zakaria's insight is that he understands the anonymous White House staffer who famously boasted "we are makers of history" is in fact right, but only halfway. We--the US--are not alone in making history. The "other guys" are making history, too, for their own purposes. The effect of globalization has been that these other actors have been able to gain substantial means and opportunity to affect the course of history. Zakaria understands, too, however, that this history-making is not a zero sum game: while India, China, and other international actors might be looking to remake history to their ends, their aims do not necessarily involve confronting U.S. or upsetting U.S.-defined world order. Indeed, their goals, for the most part, are perfectly achievable within the context of U.S.-defined world order, provided that they can get their rightfully earned "fair share" from playing by its rules.

What Zakaria suggests is that this situation provides the United States with plenty of leverage to exert influence. It can maintain, and where necessary, put forward, an international order that favors its interests on the whole, but also provides opportunities for other actors, as long as they abide by its rules. Zakaria mentions specifically the work of Bismark, who, in 1880s, crafted an international order where Germany stood as an "honest broker" who could exert influence by prescribing rules and solutions that were fair enough that other countries actually wanted to abide by. In principle, I like this vision, but I doubt this has any chance of success. Zakaria's own example of Germany itself provides an example of how such an arrangement can unravel very quickly.

An honest broker cannot be too greedy. He must renounce all his prejudices to be accepted and trusted as being "honest." Historically, Germany could not put up with this renunciation for so long. Germany was strong and many of its leaders and population were not content retreating to the back seat when they felt they could do better--at least in short or medium term--by asserting their strength and doing what they wanted, even at the cost of losing the credibility to act as "honest broker." Merely two decades after the Congress of Berlin that inaugurated this new world order, Bismarck himself was ousted from power and Germany began to poke its nose in businesses that were of little substnatial import to them--often for the sake of short term domestic public opinion. It antagonized the British over the Boer War. It built a battleship navy that had little use other than make the British nervous and angry. It antagonized the Russians over the Near East. The list can go on. The lesson is clear: even if the long term advantages of playing an honest broker are substantial, the temptation of using hard power to gain a short term advantage is difficult to resist, especially when that hard power is right there. I doubt a powerful nation--which United States is bound to remain for the foreseeable future--can so easily become and remain an honest broker. Bismarck was a political genius--and even he could manage it for only two decades. Can lesser politicians do it? I am skeptical.
Thetalune Thetalune
I decided to read this becaise I saw that Barack Obama was reading it and I wanted to see what he has been thinking about. I can see where this will help him if he becomes President, because the author does a good job of explaining and defining the post American world.

The author maintains that the 21st century is not so much about the decline of American influence as it is abot the rise of the third world. China, India, and African nations are becoming more technologically advanced and globalized. Moreover, half of all PHD students in the sciences in the USA are foreign students from overseas.

Fareed Zakaria also suggests that Americans need to continue emphasizing technological development and educational advancement if they want to stay competitive with the world. We also need to realize that not all Muslims are of the radical kind, and that we need to be more wise and discerning.

The author also shows how the nations of the earth have tended to prosper under administrations that have emphasized development, like post Mao Tse Tong China.

This is a good primer on the international landscape and people should read it.
Macage Macage
Zakaria presents an excellent, balanced view of the future of American unipolarity and the impact of the Big Two - China and India, on America's future. Instead of doomsday predictions and worry about how China and India will take over, he presents a pragmatic view of how these and other countries are rising - not that America is necessarily failing.

Zakaria also outlines a realistic roadmap for how America can avoid continuing as an international pariah and retain its influence, by realizing it is the most powerful part of a multipolar system, but the other parts add up to far more than its power. His repeated statements of how we live in fear rather than pride strike a powerful chord and should make all Americans focus on what we've done right rather than what we are told to fear.