cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights
eBook The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights ePub

eBook The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights ePub

by Irene Khan

  • ISBN: 0393337006
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Irene Khan
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Original edition (October 15, 2009)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1614 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1362 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf azw lit
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 530

Description

Irene Khan, Secretary General of Amnesty International, has written a fine book on what she rightly calls & the world's worst human rights crisis'. She points out that the inequities in the world today are greater than those in apartheid South Africa, and they are growing

Irene Khan, Secretary General of Amnesty International, has written a fine book on what she rightly calls & the world's worst human rights crisis'. She points out that the inequities in the world today are greater than those in apartheid South Africa, and they are growing. The number of those suffering hunger has risen steadily since 2000.

Amnesty International Head Irene Khan on "The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights" Saturday marks the . Irene Khan argues that these harsh numbers alone dont tell the whole story. Poverty, the book argues, must be recognized as the worlds worst human rights crisis.

Amnesty International Head Irene Khan on "The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights" Saturday marks the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty  .

The Unheard Truth book. Start by marking The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Human rights - I think what the war on terror showed was the fragility of human rights. Irene Khan is secretary general of Amnesty International. She has just written the book The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights. The original content of this program is licensed under a Creative Commons rcial-No Derivative Works . United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to democracynow.

Poverty is the worst human-rights crisis in the world today, denying billions of people their most basic rights. ISBN13: 9780393337006.

Irene Khan, secretary general of Amnesty International, talked about her book The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights (. Norton & C. October 15, 2009). She argues that human rights and poverty are directly connected and that improving human rights around the world is necessary to eradicate global poverty which is perpetuated by corruption, disenfranchisement and other social ills.

Самые новые твиты от Irene Khan (nheardtruth): "The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human . The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Right to be launched soon! 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

Самые новые твиты от Irene Khan (nheardtruth): "The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Right to be launched soon!" .

The theme of this book is understanding and tackling worldwide poverty, conceived as the denial of human rights .

Irene Khan, secretary general of Amnesty International, explains her aim: "I want to convince you, the reader, that not only are the poor denied human rights but also - and more importantly - that if we act in effective ways to protect those rights, our efforts to end poverty stand a far greater chance of success.

The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780393337006 (978-0-393-33700-6) Softcover, W. W. Norton & Company, 2009. Find signed collectible books: 'The Unheard Truth: Poverty and Human Rights'.

Irene Khan, Amnesty International's first female secretary general, spoke at CIGI about poverty and human . Rosie is one of many people mentioned in Khan’s new book, The Unheard Truth. Khan argued that poverty like Rosie’s is not only about lack of income.

Irene Khan, Amnesty International's first female secretary general, spoke at CIGI about poverty and human rights. In her recently published book, The Unheard Truth, she asserts that economic solutions alone cannot end poverty. Empowering people is key to lifting them out of poverty. It is also about deprivation, exclusion, insecurity and powerlessness – a state that reinforces itself in a downward spiral. Without rights, the poor will remain powerless, Khan said.

A powerful argument by the secretary general of Amnesty International that poverty is not just an economic problem but a global human-rights violation.

In our rapidly globalizing age with economic growth occurring in almost every corner of the world, it is easy to forget that more than one billion people still live on less than one dollar a day. Poverty is the worst human-rights crisis in the world today, denying billions of people their most basic rights. In a bracing argument enriched by compelling photographs from across the world, Amnesty International Secretary General Irene Khan makes the case that poverty remains a global epidemic because we continue to define it as an economic problem whose only solution is foreign aid and investment. Khan calls for a reevaluation of this longstanding assumption and turns us toward confronting poverty as a human-rights violation. Empowering the poor with basic rights of security is our only chance for eradicating poverty and giving freedom and dignity to those who have never experienced it.35 photos

Comments

Manarius Manarius
Irene Khan, Secretary General of Amnesty International, has written a fine book on what she rightly calls `poverty, the world's worst human rights crisis'.

She points out that the inequities in the world today are greater than those in apartheid South Africa, and they are growing. The number of those suffering hunger has risen steadily since 2000. In 2008, rising food prices pushed 100 million people back down into poverty, and the economic crisis has forced another 50 million into poverty. One billion people go to bed hungry every night.

China now spends less than 1 per cent of its GDP on health care, ranking it 156th of 196 UN member states. 30 million more Chinese people were illiterate in 2005 than in 2000. The richest 10 per cent of China's people get 30 times the income of the poorest 10 per cent. In India, 42 per cent of females over the age of 6 have never attended school.

Ms Khan shows how countries need the universal provision of essential services, including, for example, abortion: South Africa's deaths from abortion complications fell by 90 per cent after it was legalised in 1994.

In a brilliant chapter on the need for housing, she points out, "the market on its own has failed to provide affordable and accessible homes to all sectors of society ... Global housing debates tend to accept that only market-based solutions to the global housing crisis will prevail (despite such approaches arguably being the cause of the crisis in the first place!)"

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights states, "The States Parties to the present Covenant recognize the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living for himself and his family, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and to the continuous improvement of living conditions." The USA has not ratified this Covenant; China has not ratified the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Ms Khan argues against the false notion that there are two distinct kinds of freedom - positive (economic, social and cultural) and negative (civil and political), imposing positive and negative obligations on states. As she observes, "Building an effective court system to ensure fair trials is as positive an obligation as building schools to fulfil the right to universal primary education." And, "As regards cost, most human rights require resources. Maintaining a fair and effective judicial system requires significant public investment. Without it many civil and political rights would be impossible to fulfil. Cost should not be a determinant of human rights."

But, as she notes, "All sides are placing high levels of trust in the market to deliver rights - despite the global economic crisis exposing the fallacy of such an approach" and points out that voluntary codes, like the UN Global Compact, have led to no `significant change in the behaviour of companies or governments'.

Yet she finishes by just vaguely advising the richer countries to `do much more - in their trade and investment policies, in tackling the companies, banks and arms dealers ...'
caif caif
The statistics on poverty are staggering. People know that others are starving somewhere on this planet but have power to do nothing except shake their heads. People starve on one side of the world while the majority of people on the other side are full with some being obese and requiring surgery to remove the excess fat. The author of this book, Irene Khan, together with Amnesty International believes that poverty is a denial of human rights. How are the two connected? Every man, woman, and child on Earth has the right to shelter and food and if they are not getting those two and a few other things, then they are being denied their human rights.

The author gives many examples of countries denying their people human rights. We go from South America to the Sub Saharan Africa and we read terrible stories of people suffering. On page 178, we read about the story of the country Chad where 80% of the people live below the poverty line. They were given millions of dollars to build an oil pipeline and the money was supposed to go the poor people of Chad. Instead, 30 million dollars was used to buy weapons and the rest was embezzled by the President Idriss Deby-whom Forbes magazine called a pig- and his government. This led to the people- who are called rebels and terrorists by the government- rising up in anger and it has led to fighting and destruction that has left tens of thousands of people homeless, refugees, or dead.

Earlier in the book, we read about another nation- this one a liberal democracy- Israel, which has placed 500 military checkpoints on using roads in the occupied territory. The previous sentence sounds strange and it should because their should not be a democracy that is unjust to those whom it considers minorities. Yet the facts are true and the book states on page 77 that 80 % of the people of Gaza depend on humanitarian aid for their survival. The people there are like prisoners in their own country, unable to trade or make contact with the outside world; their means of survival as well as the Palestinians in the West Bank are limited. Khan goes on to say that "attacks on civilians and infrastructure are not collateral damage but a deliberate strategy to terrorize and uproot populations and occupy lands." And when the population gets frustrated and does anything to resist the brutal system they are in, guess what the government of Israel will call those people.

Poverty is just the end of a long line of corruption and injustice. There is enough food in the world to feed every human on it with 3 decent meals a day. The problem is that we have unequal distribution of resources. A few people enjoy the best food while the majority of the people are in the dark and are powerless to do anything about their corrupt leaders. Civil societies will never be strong enough to ensure that the voices of the people are heard and respected. The only solution is a system or way of life that ensures everyone must contribute to the poor and there is only one system in the world that can carry out this plan.