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eBook Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (Interpreting American Politics) ePub

eBook Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (Interpreting American Politics) ePub

by Sidney M. Milkis

  • ISBN: 0801861950
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Sidney M. Milkis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (September 7, 1999)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1714 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1368 kb
  • Other: azw lrf mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 321

Description

Sidney M. Milkis is a professor of government and senior scholar at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.

Sidney M. His books include The American Presidency: Origins and Development (with Michael Nelson) and The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System since the New Deal. Series: Interpreting American Politics. The focus was primarily on local affairs. They called for direct democracy methods such as the referendum to bypass narrow party interests.

Today, American democracy would not work without them. In Political Parties and Constitutional Government, Sidney Milkis explores the uneasy relationship between the Constitution and the party system to advance a novel argument: political parties arose as The . Constitution makes no mention of political parties, yet parties began to form shortly after its ratification. Today, American democracy would not work without them

In Political Parties and Constitutional Government, Sidney Milkis explores the uneasy relationship between the Constitution and the party system to advance a novel argument: political parties arose as part of a deliberate program of constitutional reform.

In Political Parties and Constitutional Government, Sidney Milkis explores the uneasy relationship between the Constitution and the party system to advance a novel argument: political parties arose as part of a deliberate program of constitutional reform.

3 Organization of American political parties. General developments. None of the colonies had political parties of the sort that formed in the 1790s, but each had shifting factions that vied for power. Development of the two-party system in the United States. While the roots of democracy were apparent, nevertheless deference was typically shown to social elites in colonial elections. That deference declined sharply with the American Revolution.

Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy (Interpreting American Politics) Format: Paperback Authors: Sidney M. Milkis ISBN10: 0801861950 Published: 1999-09-07 Political Parties and American Democracy. Interpreting American Politics. Johns Hopkins University Press.

- Sidney M. Milkis: Political Parties and Constitutional Government: Remaking American Democracy. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

The essential story of American politics and government is the .

The essential story of American politics and government is the relationship between liberalism and democracy.

The Federalist Party was the first American political party and existed .

The Federalist Party was the first American political party and existed from the early 1790s to 1816. The party was run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth. The n Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1791–1793 to oppose the centralising policies of the new Federalist Party.

The U.S. Constitution makes no mention of political parties, yet parties began to form shortly after its ratification. Today, American democracy would not work without them. In Political Parties and Constitutional Government, Sidney Milkis explores the uneasy relationship between the Constitution and the party system to advance a novel argument: political parties arose as part of a deliberate program of constitutional reform.

Forged on the anvil of Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, parties initially formed as decentralized political associations that engaged the attention of ordinary citizens and held presidents accountable to local constituencies. But as the power of the presidency and the federal government grew, parties shifted their attention from building political support in the states and localities to vying for control over national administration and, in the process, lost their vital connection to the electorate. In the past thirty years, partisan disputes have more often than not involved confrontations between the president and Congress that have undermined the public's respect for American political institutions.

With the decline of localized parties, Milkis concludes, there has arisen an administrative politics of rights and entitlements that belittles the efforts of Democrats and Republicans alike to define a collective purpose. Ending with a discussion of possible methods of revitalization and reform, this timely book does much to explain the reasons behind Americans' disenchantment with parties and the party system.

Comments

shustrik shustrik
The historically changing role of political parties is the subject of this book. Jefferson and Madison and then the backers of Andrew Jackson established political parties to ensure that "We, the People" had a voice in political affairs. The focus was primarily on local affairs.
However the Progressive movement felt that local party fiefdoms presented roadblocks to addressing the complexities of an industrial society. They called for direct democracy methods such as the referendum to bypass narrow party interests. Their outlook was decidedly national in scope or neo-Hamiltonian.
The New Deal saw the ascendancy of the executive branch as the primary branch of government for proposing solutions and for administering a complex and liberal national state. Parties were subordinate to this purpose [see the Roosevelt purge of conservatives]. Johnson's Good Society continued with the New Deal program adding more administratively determined entitlement programs. But the author points out that adaptations were made to this strengthened presidency. Public interest groups comprised of experts represented the various publics' interests. The legal system gained importance in adjudicating those causes. And Congress with a vast proliferation of subcommittees and staff has taken on a secondary watchdog role. But the hugely expansive Presidency still controls public policy.
The parties of today are fundraising and marketing bodies. Candidates are recruited to serve the parties' national and administrative purposes. Then the candidates are advertised via the mass media bypassing any remnants of local parties. The average citizen's participation is entirely passive: watch television and cast a ballot.
The author does not advocate for the return of strong locally oriented political parties. Other than achieving higher rates of citizen participation, there is no indication that 19th century style politics could contend with a complex state. It would have been of interest to see speculation about the impact of campaign finance reform on this state of affairs. A mild criticism of the book is that the author seems to lament the passing of local parties without calling for their return or specifying a suitable alternative. But for those interested in democracy, parties, and an effective, modern government, this book will be thought provoking.
Warianys Warianys
Bought this as a gift for my son. He is taking a college class in US government and admitted he knows nothing about politics. He hasn't read it yet, but he glanced through it and advised me he really thinks it will help with his class and it will provide him with much needed background on politics and government.
Onnell Onnell
To the previous reviewers who referred to Milkis as "her," he's a man. Thank you.