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eBook The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000 ePub

eBook The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000 ePub

by Paul Kennedy

  • ISBN: 0006860524
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Paul Kennedy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers; New Ed edition (February 28, 1989)
  • Pages: 926
  • ePub book: 1694 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1844 kb
  • Other: mobi txt docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 265

Description

About national and international power in the "modern" or Post Renaissance period. Explains how the various powers have risen and fallen over the 5 centuries since the formation of the "new monarchies" in W. Europe.

About national and international power in the "modern" or Post Renaissance period. Издание: 1. Издательство: Random House.

Rise and Fall of Great Powers" came out towards the end of the Cold . Paul Kennedy charts over a 500 year period how great powers rise and fall.

Rise and Fall of Great Powers" came out towards the end of the Cold War, when American economic supremacy was questioned by the expensive military need to contain the Soviet Union worldwide. The real strength of this book is not even in its overarching argument but in the sheer synthesis and presentation of so much useful data about great powers from 1500-2000. Economic resources fuel rises in power that lead to military buildups to protect that power.

He studies and reports on economic and military factors that accompanied or caused previously dominant nations to lose their Great Power status. He divides the (1987) world into 5 principle actors: the US, the European Union (England, France, Germany only), the Soviet Union, China, and Japan. I think Kennedy meant to focus primarily on superpowers, and these only came into existence after roughly the year 1500.

The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000, by Paul Kennedy, first published in 1987, explores the politics and economics of the Great Powers from 1500 to 1980 and the reason for their decline

The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers: Economic Change and Military Conflict from 1500 to 2000, by Paul Kennedy, first published in 1987, explores the politics and economics of the Great Powers from 1500 to 1980 and the reason for their decline. It then continues by forecasting the positions of China, Japan, the European Economic Community (EEC), the Soviet Union and the United States through the end of the 20th century.

Bibliography: p. 541-662. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today. All we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit.

06 MB·70,034 Downloads·New!, while, a lot has changed in a generation, much has not. We still have air pollution; we still. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·102,671 Downloads·New! investments. Dietary Reference Intakes.

Kennedy’s masterwork begins in the year 1500, at a time of. .

Kennedy’s masterwork begins in the year 1500, at a time of various great centres of power including Minh China, the Ottomans, the rising Mughal state, the nations of Europe. But it was the latter which, through competition, economic growth and better military organisation, came to dominate the globe - until challenged later by Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Now China, boosted by its own economic prowess, rises to the fore

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Explains how the various powers have risen and fallen over the 5 centuries since the formation of the "new monarchies" in W. There can be no rise of a great military without that country first having a booming economy

Explains how the various powers have risen and fallen over the 5 centuries since the formation of the "new monarchies" in W. There can be no rise of a great military without that country first having a booming economy. It seems then that once a booming economy is achieved it is only a natural next step that the politicians start waving the war flag that necessitates the building of a military to complement the economic successes.

This study describes how the past 500 years shows that nations which became great powers had to decline as their growth rate slowed and their spending on defence continued to increase and explains how this can be eased or worsened by clever or short-sighted policy decisions. The final chapter looks at the current dilemna of the USA, the USSR, the EEC, Japan and China, and peers. Paul Kennedy also wrote "Strategy and Diplomacy, 1870-1945" and "The Realities Behind Diplomacy, 1865-1980"

Comments

Skillet Skillet
In this book, Paul Kennedy is searching for a pattern to explain "the rise and fall of great powers".He studies and reports on economic and military factors that accompanied or caused previously dominant nations to lose their Great Power status. He divides the (1987) world into 5 principle actors: the US, the European Union (England, France, Germany only), the Soviet Union, China, and Japan. He discusses their economic and military strengths and weaknesses, and likely affects on their Great Power status. NOTE: This book was published in 1987, before the fall of the Soviet Union, before the fall of the Berlin Wall, and before China achieved its major economic transformation by adopting (somewhat) free-market policies. Thus, one might think that this book is well past its shelf life. However, what Kennedy undertakes to do is not to report on the world as it is in 1987, but to describe historical trends far predating 1987 and ending with the state of the would-be claimants to great power status as of 1987, and to show the role of interlocking factors of economic and military strength in trying to attain or preserve Great Power status.
Mbon Mbon
The aurora does an excellent job of relating how the ups and downs of great world powers are inextricably related to the economies of the large countries. There can be no rise of a great military without that country first having a booming economy. It seems then that once a booming economy is achieved it is only a natural next step that the politicians start waving the war flag that necessitates the building of a military to complement the economic successes. It almost seems a required next step though that the politicians are never satisfied until they have spent the country back into poverty from whence they had come.so it seems that economic boom followed by a big military machine which gobbles up all that excess money and constantly demands more to fight another war is the BOOM--BUST narrative that most great powers have followed. No country can remain at constantly and not break the bank and put its people back in the chains of poverty..........and that is basically what this book taught me. .... Unfortunately, I don't think the American give tinkers damn or they would stop this madness in Washington. Ps you can look at the Spanish in the 16-17 centuries to verify this case.

Thanks

Doc
Lonesome Orange Kid Lonesome Orange Kid
The "Rise and Fall of the Great Powers" is a book full of interesting thoughts. I preferred to read this book not from the beginning to the end, but rather, from the end to the beginning. This book is dense, full of facts and figures, but signifying something very relevant. Today's geopolitical landscape is much more fragmented than polarized as it was when Kennedy first published his book, 1988. Still our world leaders are facing a similar set of complex variables. These variables relate to the strength of our security requirements and the rising cost of expenditures which outpace domestic growth.
If you are interested in topics with far reaching global implications, I suggest you read at least the beginning and the end of Kennedy's 550 plus page thesis. I am reminded of Dorner's book, "The Logic of Failure". In it Dorner shows us how and why complex situations generate habits of thought which set failure in motion from the beginning. History seems to repeat itself. At least both Kennedy and Dorner agree on this!
Qutalan Qutalan
The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers by Paul Kennedy was written in 1989 in the twilight of the Cold War. This twenty-seven year time lag that a reader in 2016 leads to make mincemeat out of some of the conclusions such as this rapid rise of Japan and the role of Europe as a potential large power (this was before the 1990s Asia financial crisis and of course the 2000s global financial crisis).

Still I think the historical trends that Kennedy traces in his almost five hundred year study are valid for modern times. In particular, the comments about failing to keep up with modern technological innovation and the notion of an overreach with great powers being drained of their economic resources because of the commitments that they have made. I think of the United States in multiple wars and committed to security throughout the world.

What we learn ultimately is that no great power can have it all, forever.
Jorius Jorius
The introduction chapter by P. Kennedy is excellent and appears to cover the whole topic in its entirety. The subsequent chapters seem intended to provide case studies to further illustrate the introduction chapter's concept, but: they are too long and not as eloquent, and some of them, like the one by Condolezza Rice, - with all due respect - seem incomplete or seem to contradict themselves or both.
Nahelm Nahelm
The book is highly informative, and goes into a lot of detail explaining why some empires rise and some fall. I really enjoyed the author's take on why Europe prospered in the way it did, and how Britain's economy helped it shoulder the burdens placed on it by Napoleonic Wars.

I would say that the best way to enjoy the book would be to have a little bit of background in history first, because it does a fantastic job of answering all the questions you might have after exploring a bit of history yourself.

Easily five out of five stars.