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eBook Getting Somalia Wrong?: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State (African Arguments) ePub

eBook Getting Somalia Wrong?: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State (African Arguments) ePub

by Mary Jane Harper

  • ISBN: 1842779338
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Mary Jane Harper
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Zed Books (February 15, 2012)
  • Pages: 139
  • ePub book: 1776 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1721 kb
  • Other: doc azw lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 477

Description

Mary Harper is a BBC journalist specializing in Africa. She has reported from Somalia since the outbreak of civil war in 1991 and from other war zones across Africa, including Sudan, Liberia, and the Democratic Republic of Congo

Mary Harper is a BBC journalist specializing in Africa. She has reported from Somalia since the outbreak of civil war in 1991 and from other war zones across Africa, including Sudan, Liberia, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. She has written for several publications including The Economist and The Washington Post. Series: African Arguments.

Getting Somalia Wrong? book Harper focuses much more on the history and conflicts within Somalia with the pirates being almost peripheral.

Getting Somalia Wrong? book. It feels as if pirates off the African coast are rather old news today, but this is not an adventure from old boy’s literature from the British Empire. The reality of this story is more interesting and challenging than the story we expect to hear. 1. 9 Zed Books 978-1842779330. Harper focuses much more on the history and conflicts within Somalia with the pirates being almost peripheral.

Faith and War in a Shattered State (A. .Mary Harper is a BBC journalist specializing in Africa.Last oneFree postage. item 2 Getting Somalia Wrong?: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State (African. Getting Somalia Wrong?: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State (African. She has reported from Somalia since the outbreak of civil war in 1991 and from other war zones across Africa, including Sudan, Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. She has written for a number of publications including The Economist and The Washington Post. Country of Publication.

Mary Harper shows in a recent book that, while the Somali state underwent collapse, other forms of organisation have . In Somalia, the African Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) forces are engaged in a fierce counter-insurgency campaign against Al Shabab terrorists.

Mary Harper shows in a recent book that, while the Somali state underwent collapse, other forms of organisation have to some extent counterbalanced this, supporting both technological and economic development (Harper 2012). The societal forms that have enabled this involve strong, local cultural patterns suitable for a 'rough neighbourhood' where international conflicts shape and are shaped by regional and local divisions – clan, religion, state and gender. Regional and international players such as Ethiopia and the USA support AMISOM.

Mary’s book is an excellent way to (begin to) understand Somalia, a place that she evidently loves. She doesn’t pretend that it’s anything less than a complicated and unique country, but leaves readers flattering themselves that they understand the country more than is genuinely possible!

Mary’s book is an excellent way to (begin to) understand Somalia, a place that she evidently loves. She doesn’t pretend that it’s anything less than a complicated and unique country, but leaves readers flattering themselves that they understand the country more than is genuinely possible! I really enjoyed reading the book, and now have a bit more of an idea why Steve thought Mogadishu was the best place in Africa.

Getting somalia wrong? Faith, war and hope in a shattered state.

In doing so, Harper argues that viewing Somalia through the prism of al-Qaeda risks further destabilizing the country and the entire Horn of Africa, while also showing that though the country may be a failed state, it is far from being a failed society. In reality, alternative forms of business, justice, education, and local politics have survived and even flourished.

Several months ago I interviewed Steve Bloomfield, the author of a book on African football, for New Books in African studies. More from New Books in African Studies

Somalia is a failed state, notorious for piracy and the rise of Islamist extremism

Somalia is a failed state, notorious for piracy and the rise of Islamist extremism. At least that is how it is usually portrayed. As Mary Harper argues, until the international community starts to ‘get it right’, the consequences will be devastating, not just for Somalia but also the world.

Find nearly any book by Mary Jane Harper. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Getting Somalia Wrong?: Faith, War and Hope in a Shattered State (African Arguments): ISBN 9781842779330 (978-1-84277-933-0) Softcover, Zed Books, 2012. Yeats's Vision Papers: The Automatic Script : 25 June 1918-29 March 1920.

Somalia is a comprehensively failed state, representing a threat to itself, its neighbors, and the wider world. In recent years, it has become notorious for the piracy off its coast and the rise of Islamic extremism, opening it up as a new "southern front" in the war on terror. At least that is how it is inevitably presented by politicians and in the media. In Getting Somalia Wrong?, Mary Harper presents the first comprehensive account of the chaos into which the country has descended and the United States' renewed involvement there. In doing so, Harper argues that viewing Somalia through the prism of al-Qaeda risks further destabilizing the country and the entire Horn of Africa, while also showing that though the country may be a failed state, it is far from being a failed society. In reality, alternative forms of business, justice, education, and local politics have survived and even flourished. Provactive and eye-opening, Getting Somalia Wrong? shows that until the international community starts to "get it right," the consequences will be devastating, not just for Somalia, but for the world.

Comments

Xcorn Xcorn
Having worked in Africa for over half my adult life--most recently, five years in Nairobi--where we perceived neighboring Somalia to the north as a two dimensional failed state of armed nomads, cruel Sharia law, opportunistic piracy and tribal danger, I find Mary Harper's book informative, challenging, and quite readable, which is a real forte considering the vast complexity of the clans and the history. The themes are straightforward: that Somilia has been misunderstood and mismanaged in the arena of international politics for the last century, and that despite the popular image of Somalia as a failed state, technological, banking, and governmental solutions have arisen remarkably out of the chaos. Can Somaliland and Puntland provide an functional model for the evolution of the country as a whole, or, as we recently witnessed in the Westgate Shopping Center disaster in Nairobi, will the momentum of terrorism--domestic and exported--overwhelm the grassroots, problem solving processes that Ms. Harper identifies?
BOND BOND
Not an easy topic to fInd reliable resources on, Somalia. However this journalistic piece is worth the read but becoming dated. An update post 2011 would help but overall good background on commentary on Somalia and its demise and potential hope, e.g. Somaliland.
Lo◘Ve Lo◘Ve
Mary Harper is insightful. In this well crafted book, she has a sensitivity towards a country and a people that so many only know from what they see in the news.
Dagdardana Dagdardana
Great quick way of deepen your understanding of Somalia and challenges ahead
Dream Dream
For the most part, I found "Getting Somalia Wrong" to be a well-written and informative book. I felt its presentation of Somali history (recent and not-so-recent) to be enlightening. The sections that deal with "greater Somalia" and piracy were particularly interesting and pertinent.

One thing that bothered me was that I think the author spent a little too much time and effort blaming everyone and anyone for Somalia's troubles, except for the Somalis. I find myself wondering whether her seemingly contention that the Islamic Courts Union would have brought lasting and permanent peace to Somalia would have proved correct or not if Ethiopia had not intervened in 2006. Maybe it would have and maybe the factions of the ICU that evolved into al-Shabaab would have seized control from the relative moderates in the ICU. I also feel that she sometimes goes overboard arguing that Somalia isn't terribly broken in total. Yes, Puntland and Somaliland are doing relatively well but the overall condition of the entity known as Somalia is a mess that is full of terrorists.

I also can't help but wonder about the endorsement of the book (which appears on the back) by Adam Curtis, the individual who made the documentary "the Power of Nightmares" which argues against all evidence that "neocons" manufactured al-Qa'ida. This is a contention that Peter Bergen, who is an internationally known expert on al-Qa'ida has rubbished (and Bergen is hardly a "neocon.") The fact that the author uses an endorsement from a conspiracy theorist like Curtis makes me kind of wonder about her overall judgment.

But even with that, it's a good book.
Vijora Vijora
ANOTHER GIFT FOR MY BROTHER. BLACK HAWK DOWN WAS AN RIVETING ACCOUNT OF LIFE AND WAR IN SOMALIA. NOW, "GETTING SOMALIA WRONG" TAKES THE WORLD OF SOMALIA MANY STEPS FURTHER. IF YOU ARE AT ALL INTERESTED IN WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS PART OF THE WORLD THIS IS A MUST READ!
Doukasa Doukasa
Mary Harper shows readers the real Somalia that has survived years of turmoil and war. She is an empathetic, informed and perceptive author. The book shows how good journalism really makes a difference to how we perceive situations and countries, particularly apt with Somalia and the press it has been receiving over the last year. Harper shows how the portrayal of a country can differ from the people within it and that impartial journalism can lead a new kind of understanding.
Mary Harper shows readers the Somalia that she has seen through her years reporting from the country. As a result it is a Somalia that varies widely from what you see in the press. She shows how Somalia is only a failed state in the eyes of the Western press, but that actually human ingenuity means that people will find ways to survive and flourish. Harper shows that it is the international world that has to get it right and until they do they the country will continue to be misunderstood.