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eBook How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace) ePub

eBook How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace) ePub

by Harry Stein

  • ISBN: 038533396X
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Harry Stein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Delacorte Press; First Edition edition (June 13, 2000)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1987 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1449 kb
  • Other: lit rtf lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 775

Description

Start by marking How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy as Want to Read . As a journalist in an industry populated by liberals, Harry Stein carried the left-wing banner in his life and work. Then he became a father, and suddenly the Right sounded right.

Start by marking How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Even worse, the Left was starting to sound - and look - wrong. Stein cuts through the distortions on both sides and fearlessly tackles such provocative topics as feminism, affirmative action, PC.

Harry Stein is the author of eight previous books. He has also written for numerous publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Playboy, GQ, and Esquire, for which he created the"Ethics" column.

Stein, Harry, 1948-, Stein, Harry, 1948- - Political and social views. Authors, American - 20th century - Biography. Journalists - United States - Biography. Right and left (Political science), Conservatism - United States. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Despite all the feminist gender-bending, Stein found himself relieved to see that his children played at traditional sex roles. Stein was an early supporter of racial integration, and he takes pride in the fact that his children have black friends. He regrets that a moral giant like Dr. King (despised by radicals nowadays, along with Clarence Thomas, as an Uncle Tom) was replaced by race hustlers, and among his satirical creations is an application for college admissions and jobs wherein one can surrender one’s space for affirmative-action minorities.

Daring, brilliantly argued, and savagely funny, How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy will resonate with many who have witnessed the social revolution of the past thirty years and questioned its outcome - even if only secretly. You are in the United States store.

Harry Stein's left-liberal credentials were spotless. As a journalist in an industry populated by liberals, he carried the left-wing banner in his life and work. The transformation of Harry Stein began when he became a father

Harry Stein's left-liberal credentials were spotless. The transformation of Harry Stein began when he became a father. First of all, the Right was beginning to sound right. Even worse, the Left was beginning to sound-and look-wrong.

Conservatives aren't born-they evolve. For the naysers of this book, especially hardcore liberals, I found it interesting that many of the facts Stein used to back up his positions were pulled out of the liberally-slanted media he so accurately portrays.

Author and ethics columnist Harry Stein didn't start out conservative. But somewhere along the way, real life - and fatherhood - gave him pause. And nothing in his wildest dreams could have prepared him for what was to come. Summary, et. "First of all, the Right was beginning to sound right.

Academic journal article The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies. How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace). Harry Stein has written prolifically along popular lines as an ethics columnist for the Wall Street Journal, the author of both fiction and nonfiction books, and a frequent contributor to such media as GQ, Playboy, New York, Esquire and TV Guide. The result is that he brings a sprightly and entertaining style (such as is evidenced in the title) to this book that tells of his conversion from the radical Left in the United States to a moderate form of cultural conservatism.

Bestselling author and renowned ethics columnist Harry Stein didn't start out conservative. But somewhere along the way, real life--and fatherhood--gave him pause. In this passionate and provocative memoir, Stein recounts his personal journey from `70's liberal to `90's conservative--a journey that began with a few troubling questions he couldn't even share with his friends. Now the truth is out--in this daring, brilliantly argued, often savagely funny work that is bound to resonate with many who have witnessed the social revolution of the past thirty years and questioned even some of its outcome. Even secretly.Harry Stein's left-liberal credentials were spotless. As a journalist in an industry populated by liberals, he carried the left-wing banner in his life and work. The transformation of Harry Stein began when he became a father. And nothing in his wildest dreams could have prepared him for what was to come....First of all, the Right was beginning to sound right. Even worse, the Left was beginning to sound--and look--wrong. In a memoir both personal and political, Stein cuts through the distortions on both sides and shows how liberating it is to no longer have to pass as a correct thinker. Speaking to his peers and to his times, Stein fearlessly tackles such provocative topics as feminism, affirmative action, PC education, media, gay rights, and sexual McCarthyism. He tells what he really thinks of...sex, lies, and Bill Clinton...how his columns on Murphy Brown and day care were his personal "coming out"...the daily corruption of network news and big-time front pages...what has happened to a once-great newspaper, The New York Times.For those who dare to entertain questions--even privately--Stein offers a few tests: Choose the most biased network anchor (Pop Quiz, page 110). Learn who would have been most likely to give up his seat on a Titanic lifeboat...(see page 47). How far have academic standards fallen since the nineteenth century? Take the test on page 233. Could you pass today?Here are portraits in political courage--and cowardice. Unforgettable anecdotes about newsmakers Stein has known. It's all here and more in the witty, trenchant observations--and candid confessions--of a former liberal bound to incite, entertain, and maybe even change a few minds along the way. How to tell if you've joined the vast right-wing conspiracy: You hear someone talking about "morality" and you no longer instantly assume he must be a sexually repressed religious nut. You're actually relieved that your daughter plays with dolls and your son plays with guns. You sit all the way through Dead Man Walking and at the end still want the guy to be executed. Christmas season rolls around and it hits you there may be a religious connection. At your kids' back-to-school night, you are shocked to discover the only dead white male on your tenth-grader's reading list is Oscar Wilde. And by the end of the night you realize the only teacher who shares your values teaches phys ed. Much as you'd like to, you can't get yourself to believe that screwing around on one's wife is an addiction.

Comments

Xinetan Xinetan
Mr. Stein humorously recounts his transformation from being a member of the vanguard of the proleteriat in the 1960's to a protector of traditional values by the late 1990's. Marriage and fatherhood have reoriented his views on feminism, multiculturalism, race, sex, abortion, entertainment and a host of other topics. This is all interlaced in a highly readable personal account of his journey from knee-jerk radical (his critics would emphasize the jerk) to his account of his `outing' as a facsist (because of his views on childcare i.e., at home with mom). Beneath the humor lies some trenchant analysis of Newspeak media types (I scored 100% on his match the bloviating PC quote with the network anchor), and the general coarsening of contemporary America. Some of his most interesting observations concern the decline of the NY Times , the nations paper of record, from the paragon of journalistic integrity, objectivity , and style to a PC rag. The editorials have always been reflexively left but the news and features were straight reporting. I thought I was the only one who thought the Times' news and feature articles have taken on the gaseous cant of the Nation. There's another book here, Harry- The Decline and Fall of the NY Times - what a pity. I hope Harry makes a pile of money with this book because the PC commissars of the literary and entertainment industry won't forget this kind of right deviationism.
ndup ndup
HIAJTVRWC is a relatively entertaining and thankfully somewhat short tome describing Harry Stein's transition from an Upper-West side liberal to a normal person. Right-wing? Hardly. Stein begins with the obligatory litany of liberal credentials which for most people would be called "youthful foolishness." Everything changes when Harry and wife conceive at which time they notice that all their selfish liberal friends are well, selfish liberals. One of the first shots across Stein's liberal bow is noticing that children kinda need parents and it is absurd to assert that they would be "better off" in day-care than at home. Unfortunately, being a liberal there is no one within 10 square miles that would agree with his assessment. The final brick in Stein's transformation is of course the whole Bill Clinton impeachment controversy. Like most people Stein cannot figure out why anyone would defend Clinton's behavior. Sure, I can see where some might say it was not impeachable, but Stein's friends were actually defending the man (Gore made the same mistake and I still think that is what cost him the election). As an actual member of the VRWC I did enjoy Stein's awakening and found it really cute that he considers himself a "right-winger", unfortunately by his definition of "right-winger" about 75% of American's are too. Of course, after writing this book he has probably been kicked even further to the right by his liberal friends and neighbors, so maybe there is hope for him yet.
Llallayue Llallayue
I wont bother to repeat what has been said in all these reviews except to say that the negative comments are more revealing and illustrative of Stein's premise than the positive ones. The anger and condescention from the lefties simply prove many of Stein's points.

This book flows easily and is a well written, sometimes funny quick read. As my own conversion from non-critically thinking lock-step liberal to a (thoughtful) charter member of the VRWC closely parallels Stein's, I especially enjoyed this book.

Dont let the title throw you off.... this is NOT a bomb throwing book. In page after page-turning page, Stien simply points out how simple logic and a willingness to part oneself from prevailing group-think lead him to be able to come to his OWN conclusions without the "help" of liberal orthodoxy and politically correct social pressure.

Buy lots of copies and and them out as stocking stuffers to your liberal friends. If they are not your friends after that (and as Stein points out, you MUST be willing to take that risk), then they were not really your friends to begin with.
Brightcaster Brightcaster
Interesting introspection into becoming a conservative. Some valuable tips for converting rabid leftists. A good read.
Nilabor Nilabor
This book is interesting when you see the change of the thinking of a died in the wool liberal of the 60's become a soft spoken conservative. He takes the reader through the years of his youth, college days and life living in France. His life was a free for all style, but leads you to believe he wasn't comfortable with it all.
It was not until his marriage and children, did he understand that he wanted to be true to his wife. His views changed and wrote about his views about morality, the family and abortion. He riled up the feminist and the liberal news media when he wrote about his ideas. He drops names as if they are blast from a gun. The book is full of names of reporters, authors, news people, Hollywood and others in the circle of the press. This gets a little old, especially if you are not familiar with them. He does cover the Clinton years and his disappointment with his Presidency.
I found this book a little difficult to read, no titled chapters and it seemed to ramble and jump around to many areas. It seems strange that you find more books by former 60's liberal who woke up one day or should we say grew up and became a conservative.