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eBook A World Safe for Capitalism: Dollar Diplomacy and America's Rise to Global Power (Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History) ePub

eBook A World Safe for Capitalism: Dollar Diplomacy and America's Rise to Global Power (Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History) ePub

by Cyrus Veeser

  • ISBN: 0231235879
  • Category: Politics and Government
  • Subcategory: Politics
  • Author: Cyrus Veeser
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (May 11, 2007)
  • Pages: 190
  • ePub book: 1670 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1604 kb
  • Other: txt docx lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 244

Description

The story begins in the 1890s, when a .

Gregory Weeks Latin Americanist). The story begins in the 1890s, when a . company floated bonds in Europe to raise money for the Dominican Republic.

See Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History Series for a complete list of titles in this series. Dollar Diplomacy and America’s Rise. Columbia university press new york. Columbia University Press. Publishers Since 1893. New York, Chichester, West Sussex.

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However, the rise of migration did not signal the beginning of a new, more egalitarian alternative to imperialism in hemispheric relations.

Bailey finds that dollar diplomacy was designed to make both people in foreign lands and the American investors prosper. Dollar Diplomacy and America's Rise to Global Power. Columbia University Press, 2002). The concept is relevant to both Liberia, where American loans were given in 1913, and Latin America. Latin Americans tend to use the term "dollar diplomacy" disparagingly to show their disapproval of the role that the . corporations have played in using economic, diplomatic and military power to open up foreign markets.

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New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. xiv + 247 pp. Index, notes, bibliography, photographs. Recommend this journal.

The Global Republic: America’s Inadvertent Rise to World Power (2014) Rosenberg, Emily S. Spreading the American Dream: American Economic and Cultural Expansion, 1890-1945 (1982) Williams, William Appleman.

Noel Maurer, The Empire Trap: The Rise and Fall of . Intervention to Protect American Property Overseas, 1893-2013 (2013), pp. 1-24, 89-147 (Introduction and Chapter 4: The Trap Closes ). RECOMMENDED: Frieden, Jeffrey. The Global Republic: America’s Inadvertent Rise to World Power (2014) Rosenberg, Emily S.

Columbia studies in contemporary American history. Includes bibliographical references (p. -238) and index. United States - Foreign economic relations - Dominican Republic.

This award-winning book provides a unique window on how America began to intervene in world affairs. In exploring what might be called the prehistory of Dollar Diplomacy, Cyrus Veeser brings together developments in New York, Washington, Santo Domingo, Brussels, and London. Theodore Roosevelt plays a leading role in the story as do State Department officials, Caribbean rulers, Democratic party leaders, bankers, economists, international lawyers, sugar planters, and European bondholders, among others. The book recounts a little-known incident: the takeover by the Santo Domingo Improvement Company (SDIC) of the foreign debt, national railroad, and national bank of the Dominican Republic. The inevitable conflict between private interest and public policy led President Roosevelt to launch a sweeping new policy that became known as the Roosevelt corollary to the Monroe Doctrine. The corollary gave the U. S. the right to intervene anywhere in Latin American that "wrongdoing or impotence" (in T. R.'s words) threatened "civilized society." The "wrongdoer" in this case was the SDIC. Imposing government control over corporations was launched and became a hallmark of domestic policy. By proposing an economic remedy to a political problem, the book anticipates policies embodied in the Marshall Plan, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank.